Washington (State) Museum of Glass Showcases Washington (DC) Glass School Directors

Sculptures by each of the Washington Glass School Directors – Tim Tate, Erwin Timmers and Michael Janis- were acquired for the permanent collection of the Tacoma Museum of Glass (MOG).

Michael Janis, “Healing Words” 2009, kilnformed glass, glass powder imagery, 37″ x 19″ x 2″, Collection Museum of Glass.

A long-time Museum of Glass Trustee, Potomac, MD-based glass-art collector Robert Minkoff selected MOG to house his art collection before passing away in September 2020. Developed through decades of patronage and philanthropy, the collection celebrates the incredible diversity of glass art and its possibilities in the field of contemporary art.  With the addition of Robert Minkoff’s personal collection, the Museum’s glass holdings are now the largest in the Western United States.

The artworks by the Washington Glass School artists will be part of a yearlong exhibit Boundless Curiosity: A Journey with Robert Minkoff, opening April 2, 2022.

Organized by Museum of Glass and curated by Katie Buckingham, ‘Boundless Curiosity’ follows Minkoff’s love of glass and tells vibrant stories of glass’s evolution from a studio craft material. “The Minkoff Collection is a transformational gift to the Museum” said curator Katie Buckingham. “We are excited about the opportunity to widen the story of glass art and show compelling narrative sculptural work”.

MOG’s contemporary glass collection concentrates on how medium of glass interacts with modern day art. Citing “glass secessionism” (as defined by Tim Tate and William Warmus in their “21st Century Glass Conversations and Images” online group) there is a movement in glass art away from “technique” towards “artistic vision” and concept. Said Curator Buckingham “we all look forward to including the artworks by the Washington Glass School directors – the 3 Musketeers of Glass.”

Washington Glass School artists Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate and Michael Janis (aka aka- Athos, Porthos and Aramis)

Works by noted glass artists Dale Chihuly, Lino Tagliapietra, Debora Moore, Therman Statom, Amber Cowan, Susan Taylor Glasgow, Shane Ferro, Paul Stankard, and Laura Donefer round out the exhibit in the main gallery of the Museum. The Minkoff collection exhibition will kick off the Glass Art Society (GAS) 2022 international conference held in Tacoma, WA this May.

About Museum of Glass

Located in Tacoma, Washington, Museum of Glass is a premier contemporary art museum dedicated to glass and glassmaking in the West Coast’s largest and most active museum glass studio. Opened in 2002, the Museum has established a reputation for hosting impactful and engaging artist residencies, organizing nationally traveling exhibitions, and creating unique programs for visitors while building a growing permanent collection chronicling the development of modern and contemporary glass. 

Museum of Glass provides an environment for artists and the public to ignite creativity, fuel discovery, and enrich their lives through glass and glassmaking. MOG’s glass holdings are now the largest in the Western United States.

BOUNDLESS CURIOSITY: A JOURNEY WITH ROBERT MINKOFF

Opening April 2, 2022 thru 2023

Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock Street, Tacoma, WA 98402

www.museumofglass.org

May 14th Open Studios- Save the Date!

Save The Date! May 14th is the proposed date for Washington Glass School Open Studio Tour! Many of the surrounding art studios and galleries will be participating! We will follow health protocols – and it will be great to see all in real life! Come and see what’s new and what has been shaking at the studio!

DC Line features Michael Janis COVID-19 Artwork story

Washington, DC nonprofit media organization – The DC Line – is dedicated to covering news in Washington, DC. As part of the COVID-19 pandemic news coverage, DC LIne interviewed WGS Co-Director Michael Janis to see how the arts are handling the ongoing lockdowns. Have a read of how the artist and studio have worked thru the lockdown situation. Click here to jump to the DC Line article online. 

The DC Line features artwork by Michael Janis that addresses the COVID-19 pandemic.

The DC Line features artwork by Michael Janis that addresses the COVID-19 pandemic.

“How We Take Care of Each Other” Artwork in the Time of Corona – Installation by Michael Janis

We are social creatures. Every relationship has been built and held together by complicated nonverbal language, beginning with parent and child. It’s part of our social fabric. Individual, family, and interpersonal relationships have all changed as a result of the COVID-19 emergency. What is the characteristic of a pandemic? Emptiness. The unusual quiet in what was normally noisy, bustling neighborhood. Silence – where the silence isn’t merely the absence of noise. It’s judgement, longing and paranoia.The fear the we may be ourselves a transmitter of the virus as we seek the comfort of others.

How people are psychologically affected by and coping with the COVID-19 emergency is the basis of the installation of kiln cast glass by WGS artist Michael Janis. Over 20 individual glass panels make up the large wall-mounted work.

Janis’ signature “sgraffito” imagery – where he manipulates fine crushed glass powder  into highly detailed imagery and portraiture, fires the images into layers of colored glass is used to strong effect in this new work. Images of that convey the sense of how we are connected and yet are contained into separate worlds is the essence of the work. Working in the isolation of the lock downed studio, Janis says he will continue to add to the installation as the virus continues to work thru the world. “Working on artwork keeps me sane” says the artist.

Partial view of Michael Janis’ “How We Take Care Of Each Other” glass art installation. Kilnformed glass; glass powder imagery; varying dimensions; 2020.

Partial view of Michael Janis’ “How We Take Care Of Each Other” glass art installation. Kilnformed glass; glass powder imagery; varying dimensions; 2020.

 

Michael Janis covid theme artwork installation

Partial view of Michael Janis’ “How We Take Care Of Each Other” glass art installation. Larger panels approx. 18″ (45cm) dia.

glass craft art made during coronavirus 2020

Detail of one of the fused glass panels in Michael Janis’ installation. Imagery made from glass powder in Janis’ signature sgraffito technique.

Michael Janis covid coronavirus art craft glass artwork 2020

Detail of Michael Janis’ glass art installation “How We Take Care Of Each Other”

Detail of works by Michael Janis.

Detail of works by Michael Janis. The translucent glass panels are mounted off the wall in varying dimensions, with light and shadow highlighting each panel edge.

glass craft american art fused kilnformed covid coronavirus 2020

Detail of one of Michael Janis’ kilnformed works. COVID-19 cases are heavily concentrated in the African American population.

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The fabric of society is held together by even the smallest physical contact. Touch is as important a social condition as anything. It reduces stress. It makes people trust one another. It allows for cooperation. When you look at people in solitary confinement suffering from touch deprivation, you see that people lose a sense that someone’s got their back, that they’re part of a community and connected to others.

Arts & Healing at Inova Schar Cancer Institute

The dedication of the Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, VA took place Monday, July 8.

artwork collection glass

Inova Schar Cancer Institute located at 8081 Innovation Park Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031

The Arts & Healing Program at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute, a department of Inova Fairfax Hospital, is a collaboration with the Smith Center for Healing and the Arts, and uses art in its many forms to help support people in treatment and recovery and their loved ones. This innovative program includes a robust permanent art collection and ongoing exhibitions, performing arts events, and other workshops.

Opening dedication ceremony of the Arts & Healing program at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute.

Opening dedication ceremony of the Arts & Healing program at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute.

The Arts & Healing Program is a resource for families, loved ones and the community to support Inova Schar’s core mission and philosophy to provide patient-centered care. New acquisitions and special site-specific artworks many DC area artists – including WGS’ Michael Janis, Tim Tate, and Allegra Marquart are in the new collection as well as works by Foon Sham, Valerie Theberge, Alan Binstock, Wendy Ross, and Susan Hostetler. 

Artists Alan Binstock and Valerie Theberge with Arts Director Shanti Norris.

Artists Alan Binstock and Valerie Theberge with Arts Director Shanti Norris.

 

Sculpture by Foon Sham at the new Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, VA.

Sculpture by Foon Sham at the new Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, VA.

The Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery at Inova Schar Cancer Institute is dedicated to exhibiting fine art that explores the innate connection between healing and creativity. Through a rotating exhibition schedule, the gallery features contemporary artists that address a diversity of significant themes, including spirituality, social change, multiculturalism, health, environmentalism and community.

One of the large commissioned artworks is a site-specific installation work by glass sculptor Michael Janis. The Washington Glass School blog has asked Michael to outline the work’s meanings and the processes he used to create the monumental recognition wall.

 

Dwight Schar Recognition Wall at Inova Schar Cancer Institute

Dwight Schar Recognition Wall at Inova Schar Cancer Institute

Inspired by the story of Dwight Schar, founder and chairman of homebuilding and mortgage giant NVR, and donation by he and his wife to develop the cancer research institute that now bears their names, I worked at creating glass pieces that have both visual and spatial depth. Mr Schar’s mother died very young, lacking of good healthcare, and Mr Schar saw the creation of a cancer center and affording them the equipment and facilities needed to advance their treatments and research as a way to repay the community that supported his home building company.

Artist Michael Janis talks to the tour group about his unusual glass technique.

Artist Michael Janis talks to the tour group about his unusual glass technique.

 

The artwork installation is a tribute to his history and largesse. A rendering of Dwight Schar made of crushed glass powder overlaps cast glass squares that depict references homes and community, as well as the advancements that science and research could bring to the world. In the center of the artwork installation, cancer awareness ribbons are the focal point, in its natural clear state, allowing all symbolic cancer awareness colors to be seen within. The end framing panels are a special iridescent glass that has many colors that shift intensity depending on the viewer perspective.

Inova Schar Center made in kiln-cast glass.

Inova Schar Cancer Institute fired in kiln-cast glass.

The central portrait of Mr Schar is made from crushed black glass powder. The fine powder was carefully manipulated with scalpel and brushes to form the detailed likeness and took many hours and kiln firings to complete. 

The clear glass ribbons have become the symbol of the new Inova Schar Institute – and Washington Glass School was later commissioned to make smaller versions of the ribbons as commemorative sculptures for valued benefactors and volunteers to the new Cancer Center. inova.schar.glass.ribbon.award

Lisa Ellis receives recognition for her work in creating the arts program at Inova Schar Institute.

Lisa Ellis receives recognition for her work in creating the arts program at Inova Schar Institute.

WGS & Virginia Glass Guild Collaborative Show @ Glass Art Society 2017 Conference

Washington Glass School and Virginia Glass Guild Collaborate for GAS Conference Exhibit

Washington Glass School and Virginia Glass Guild Collaborate for 2017 GAS Conference Exhibit in Norfolk, VA.

The Glass Art Society (GAS) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to encourage excellence and development of the glass arts, and to support the worldwide community of artists who work with glass. GAS selected Norfolk, VA’s Chrysler Museum 

The Chrysler Museum of Art Perry Glass Studio in Norfolk, VA.

The Chrysler Museum of Art Perry Glass Studio in Norfolk, VA.

of Art and its Perry Glass Studio as host for the 46th annual conference in 2017.

Tying into the creativity that is part of the GAS conference, artists of the Washington Glass School and the Virginia Glass Guild are creating a joint exhibit at the nearby Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center (March 3- June 4, 2017)

Titled “EMBRACING NARRATIVE:  Artwork of the Washington Glass School and the Virginia Glass Guild”, the show will feature works by members of the Virginia Glass Guild and directors and studio artists at the Washington Glass School (WGS). 

Portsmouth Art Cultural Center

Portsmouth Art Cultural Center

Featured WGS artists include directors Michael Janis, Tim Tate, and Erwin Timmers, and studio artists Audrey Wilson, Diane Cabe, Sean Hennessey,  Allegra Marquart, Syl Mathis, Elizabeth Mears, Debra Ruzinsky, Nancy Weisser, Erin Antognoli, Steve Durow, Jennifer Lindstrom, Sherry Selevan, and Jeff Zimmer.

Embracing Narrative: Artwork of the Washington Glass School and the Virginia Glass Guild

Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center

400 High Street, Portsmouth, VA 23704

March 3 – June 4, 2017

James Renwick Alliance Presents Artist Sibylle Peretti @ Smithsonian Renwick Gallery

Sibylle Peretti; "Land Mine"; slumped, engraved, painted and silvered glass, paper; 60" x 80" x 0.5"; 2015

Sibylle Peretti; “Land Mine”; slumped, engraved, painted and silvered glass, paper; 60″ x 80″ x 0.5″; 2015

The James Renwick Alliance (JRA) was created as an independent national nonprofit organization to celebrate the achievements of America’s craft artists and to foster scholarship, education and public appreciation of their art.  Founded in 1982, the Alliance helps support our nation’s showcase of 20th century American craft, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. 

 figurative glass art, feminist art

Sibylle Peretti; “Twins” cast glass, 18″ x 24″ x 10″; 2010

As part of the JRA Distinguished Artist Series, on  the JRA will welcomes glass sculptor Sibylle Peretti to speak about her work and inspirations at the Renwick Gallery – home to the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s collection of contemporary craft and decorative art.

Sibylle Peretti at work.

Sibylle Peretti at work.

Sibylle Peretti is an artist who grew up surrounded by traditional glassmaking. Trained as a glass designer at the State School for Glass Making in Zwiesel Germany, she learned techniques of enameling, engraving, cutting and designing glass. She expanded the range of her artistic voice as she received an MFA from the Academy of Fine Art in Cologne and was trained as a Glass Designer at the School for Glassmaking in Zwiesel, Germany. Sibylle Peretti lives and works in both New Orleans, LA and Cologne, Germany. Sibylle often works collaboratively with her husband – artist Stephen Paul Day

Sibylle Peretti; "To Know A Hawk" cast glass, 16" x 17" x 13", 2013

Sibylle Peretti; “To Know A Hawk” cast glass, 16″ x 17″ x 13″, 2013

Her work has won numerous awards and endorsements, including grants from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation as well as the 2013 United States Artist Fellowship for her glass sculptures and multimedia collages, which combine photography & drawing with surface interventions such as engraving, mirroring and glass slumping. Children and nature, as symbols of innocence and promise, are the central themes in Sibylle’s work.

Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY; Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh, PA), Museum of American Glass (Milleville, NJ), Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (Canada), Museum für Kunsthandwerk (Frankfurt, Germany), Hunter Museum (Chattanooga TN), Speed Museum (Louisville,KY), and 21c Museum (Louisville, KY).

The JRA invites the public to join Sibylle Peretti at the newly renovated Smithsonian Renwick Gallery as she talks about her work and career.

Lecture Date: Sunday, May 22, 2016
Time: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Lecture Venue: Grand Salon, Renwick Gallery

The JRA’s mission is to promote education, support and appreciation of craft. If you’d like to learn more about the group, please see the JRA website.

Norfolk’s OK SPARK Gallery Showcases Narrative Glass Art

Norfolk, VA’s  Okay Spark Gallery will be hosting an exhibit of work by 5 artists from the Washington Glass School titled “DC Five – A Glass Narrative” – from February 5th through March 6th, 2016. 

Glass artists are moving out of their disciplinary confines and now draw from multiple media and disciplines.  The exhibitions will examine the art of storytelling, personal experiences and social commentary through sculptural works in glass.  Artists from DC’s Washington Glass School (Audrey Wilson, Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate, Sean Hennessey and Michael Janis) have a conceptually derived focus to their works. The artists’ interests and practices occupy areas between disciplines and media – dissolving and redrawing the boundaries along the way.

Audrey Wilson‘s kilncast pâte de verre sculptures and multi-media works are metaphors evoking our endless manipulation of environment, our need for control, and our longing for a meaningful union with nature and the other, in a supreme balance of power and delicacy.

audrey.wilson.art.glass

Audrey Wilson, “Preparation of a Primary Beam in a Pure State”, kilncast glass, found objects. Photo by Pete Duvall.

Erwin Timmers is one of the DC area’s leading ‘eco-artists’. Recycling, waste, the environment and how they relate to society are recurring themes in his work. His works are made from recycled glass. 

Erwin-Timmers

Erwin Timmers, kilnformed recycled glass sculptures. Photo by Pete Duvall

Tim Tate merges traditional craft with contemporary digital media, often working with electronics and video components.

Blue Liason

Tim Tate, “Beware the Marquis”, cast poly-vitro, video. Photo by Pete Duvall.

Sean Hennessey regards glass as ideal for layering dimensional images and text in works that translate ideas concerning human experience, history and space.

Hennessey1

Sean Hennessey, “Drink Me”, kiln cast bas-relief glass, LED.

Michael Janis tells his stories using delicate crushed glass powder manipulated and fired into glass panels. 

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Michael Janis, “Waiting for my Shadow to Fall Back to Earth” Kiln formed glass panel with glass powder imagery. Photo by Pete Duvall.

This diverse and eclectic exhibition at OK SPARK Gallery opens February 5, 2015. Click HERE for gallery website.

DC Five – A Glass Narrative

February 5th through March 6th, 2016, Opening reception Friday Feb 5th, from 6-8PM .

OKAY_SPARK_LogoOkay Spark Gallery 

801 Boush St.
Norfolk, VA 23510
(757) 779-5784

Okay Spark is the only contemporary craft gallery in Norfolk, VA, and is located two blocks from The Chrysler Museum of Artnorfolk-va

Norfolk, Virginia is a pretty creative place. The city has a growing number of eclectic neighborhoods like the Norfolk Arts District and Ghent that are populated with art spaces and galleries like Okay Spark Gallery and the renowned Chrysler Museum of Art, a newly renovated, 220,000-square-foot attraction filled with European paintings, contemporary American art and a world-class glass art collection. 

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The DC5 doing their kiln mojo dance.

Silvia Levenson @ Katzen Arts Center

Silvia Levenson @ American University Museum

Silvia Levenson “She Flew Away” cast glass, steel wire

Artist Silvia Levenson believes her work is an expression of her soul. She uses glass not for its natural beauty, but for its potential as a narrative medium. In her exhibition Identidad, (January 24 – March 15, 2015 at the American University Museum in the Katzen Arts Center), Ms Levenson channels her identity as a survivor of the Argentinian Dirty War and her emotional connection to the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo in order to push the bounds of her skills as a glassmaker and produce refined glass work. 

Silvia Levenson was born in Buenos Aires, the capital and largest city of Argentina. She and her family went into hiding for almost three years as political activists opposing the military dictatorship of General Jorge Rafaél Videla. In 1981, during the disappearances of the so-called Dirty War in Argentina, they fled the country and immigrated to Italy, where they eventually attained dual Argentine-Italian citizenship. Between 1976 and 1983, the Argentine military dictatorship kidnapped, tortured, and killed about 30,000 people known as “los desaparecidos” or “the disappeared.” Thirty percent of those kidnapped were young women, many with children by their side or in their womb. These children were later stripped of their identity and given up for adoption. 

levenson.2

Levenson studied at the Martin Garcia School of Graphic Design in Buenos Aires. She acquired glass-making skills at the Musée-Atelier du Verre (Sars-Poteries/FR) at workshops with Antoine Leperlier (pâte-de-verre, 1991) and Vincent van Ginneke (casting, 1994). Silvia Levenson lives in Lesa/Italy and Buenos Aires. In 2004, Levenson received the Rakow Commission Award from the Corning Museum of Glass in New York.

The American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center presents a lecture titled “The Strange World of Silvia Levenson” featuring Washington Glass School Directors Tim Tate and Michael Janis to be held on Thursday, January 29, 2015, 6:00-7:00 pm at the Katzen Arts Center. 

RSVP by Jan 22, 2015 to museummembership@american.edu 

Identitdad by Silvia Levenson

January 24 through March 15, 2015

Katzen Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016

Emotional Leak

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The UK has some great glass artists – ones that are moving narrative or content driven glass forward. Erin Dickson and Jeffrey Sarmiento are two such artists, and they had collaborated on this work titled “Emotional Leak”. Both artists work out of England’s University of Sunderland, and with access to waterjet cutters, have exploited that resource to their artistic end. From Erin’s artist statement: “my works takes on…the intersection of glass and architecture. As an architect by training, and more recently a glass designer, I use my own experience to evaluate how glass can be manipulated to suit both intentions. When glass is used in architecture, it is too often viewed as a separate component passed to glass ‘specialists’ or artists for manipulation, it is allowed to become a dissected part of the building. My aim is to remove glass from being just a ‘window’ and enable it to become an architectural design element of its own. My work looks at non-traditional methods of using space and light, using glass to manipulate a viewer’s experience of place.”

 Dickson/Sarmeinto, Emotional Leak, 2011: waterjet cut glass with steel and rubber base about 9.5 x 4 x 4 ft 
Below is a video of the construction of Emotional Leak – 

Emotional Leak Construction from Sarmiento Glass on Vimeo.