DC GlassWorks Announces Closing

DC GlassWorks – one of the glass studios integral to Washington DC’s contemporary art scene – has announced its closing.

DC GlassWorks studio held many important events. UK artists Phil Vickery and Roger Tye demonstrated at DC GlassWorks as part of an international exhibition of glass and clay artists in 2013.

DC GlassWorks studio held many important events. UK artists Phil Vickery and Roger Tye demonstrated at DC GlassWorks as part of an international exhibition of glass and clay artists in 2013.

David D’Orio, the artist-entrepreneur who founded the hotshop with four other artists (Graham Caldwell, Jesse Caldwell, Alger Dole, Wyndell Williams, David DOrio) in 2001 said that the changes in the studio’s surrounding area made it impossible to continue.

Washington Glass School considered DC GlassWorks a “sister school” and held many crossover classes and events with them. We knew what an important part DC GlassWorks was to our art community. Its closing will leave a space in our hearts and our cultural melting pot.

From DC GlassWorks:

The past few years have been challenging for the studio. Our neighboring businesses have changed and, unfortunately, the business models of these new neighbors have forced us to reduce our events and offerings. In the end, location matters. Good neighbors’ matter. It is in this context that we find we can no longer continue offering glassblowing and will be closing the studio over the next month.

It has been a great run and we would like to thank all the studio artists, visiting artists, students, bands, patrons, and everyone else who have supported DC GlassWorks over the last fifteen plus years. We have had the pleasure to teach many hundreds of students of all ages and backgrounds, have hosted movie nights and countless open houses, had the pleasure to host many national and international artists, and tried to pass on our knowledge of glassblowing and sculpture to all who came to the studio. We have had great times, made great art, and hopefully enriched the lives of all persons who we interacted with.

DC GlassWorks was founded on the idea that glassblowing should be accessible to all persons and became a place where a person could start off with no glass experience and, through training, hard work, and perseverance, could make the work they wanted to make and could give back to the greater glass community. Our goal was to foster self-sufficiency so that students were prepared to work in whatever studio they ended up at. We’ve always taught that it was important for all glass artists to make sure they are involved with assisting and teaching. It is heartwarming to see so many former students still working in glass and giving back to the community.

Our parting wish is that students find a place to learn glass that fosters their creativity and self-sufficiency; where people are taught how to blow glass without having to take perpetual ‘private lessons’ before gaining access to equipment; and a place that guides student to a level where they are free to blow glass without having to pay someone to assist/supervise them. We also hope our renters find places they can work that allows them the ability to work without having to befriend the owner, work like indentured servants, or have a specific pedigree or education just to get access to glassblowing facilities. DC GlassWorks was founded to fight against these worn-out models of glass studios. Expect more and aim high.

It has been an amazing ride and we thank everyone from the bottom of our hearts for being a part of this experience.

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WGS Hosts Arizona Glass Alliance

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Director Tim Tate welcomes visiting members of the Arizona Glass Alliance to the Washington Glass School.

The Arizona Glass Alliance – part of the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass - brought a busload of collectors, artists, and glass aficionados to Washington, DC this past week. The glass group visited notable local collections, Maurine Littleton Gallery and wound up their tour of the Nation’s Capitol with dinner and a show at the Washington Glass School.

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Flux Studio’s Novie Trump describes what delights await the collectors as they continue their visit to the next door studio.

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Sean Hennessey’s new works are spectacular!

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Nadine Saylor poses in front of her works on exhibit.

The night was further enhanced with a strolling ukelele troubadour wandering thru the exhibit playing, and an all seeing psychic “Madame Raya” foretold the future for all visitors.

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The future looks bright – especially in front of a work by Sean Hennessey! Well done, Madame Raya!

Glass artist and photographer Josh Hershman shows his kiln cast glass cameras, and integrated the visiting AZ crew and the artists showing into a new artwork.

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Joshua Hershman’s cast glass cameras.

Josh used his glass camera as the lens for photo images he created using hand-held lighting. The camera and light creates a surreal, bizarre and haunting image of his subjects.

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Josh Hershman preps his model at the Glass School darkroom.

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Joshua Hershman’s evocative photo images will ultimately be printed on glass.

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ArtDC Showcases DC GlassWorks

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David D’Orio. Photo Courtesy artDC gallery.

Artdc Gallery features artists from our sister glass studio - DC GlassWorks –  in great show, now thru Aug 18. 

Joseph Corcoran. Photo Courtesy artDC gallery.
The exhibit, entitled Glass 2012, showcases 10 artists curated by Joseph Corcoran, whose work at this year’s Artomatic art fair was one of the show’s many highlights.  Dave D’Orio’s work is also featured in the Artdc exhibit, and his work at Artomatic received the James Renwick Alliance “Award of Excellence“, and further enhanced the profile of the DC area glass art scene.  The full list of artists can be found on Artdc’s website.  The exhibit will remain on display until Aug. 18. 

The Artdc Gallery is located in the Lustine Center at 5710 Baltimore Avenue in Hyattsville, MD.

Penland School of Craft Seeks Glass Shop Coordinator

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The famed Penland School of Craft in NC is seeking a Glass Studio Coordinator. Penland School of Crafts is a national center for craft education offering residential workshops, residencies, community education programs, and exhibitions. Located on 420 acres in the NC Mountains, Penland has 15 teaching studios and 50 historic and contemporary buildings. Penland School of Crafts is an equal opportunity employer with a staff of 63. Penland operates with a $5.2 million endowment and an annual operating budget of $4.2 million. Penland School of Crafts is an equal opportunity employer.

The Glass Studio Coordinator is responsible for keeping two studios in good working order and preparing for each class or activity scheduled in the space. Through a helpful and welcoming presence the Coordinator sets the tone for all classes by successfully communicating with instructors and studio assistants to insure the smooth operations of class supply ordering, studio setup, studio safety and general operations of the studio. Adaptability, analysis, attention to detail, collaboration, personal impact, dependability, safety awareness, organizational sensitivity and teamwork are characteristics central to this position. This is a technical, administrative, and services-oriented position. The Glass Studio coordinator reports directly to the Studio Manager. This is a full-time, benefits eligible, year-round, hourly position.

To Apply
The position will remain open until filled, however the initial review of applications will consist of applications received by May 7, 2010. Send resume and cover letter addressing relevant experience and interest in the position, personal contact information and email contact information for at least 3 references to Simone Travisano, Studio Manager, Penland School of Crafts, PO Box 37, Penland, NC 28765 or simonetravisano@penland.org

Full job description at penland.org.