Demystifying Public Art – Online presentation by the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass

Artists Erwin Timmers & Michael Janis will present an online ‘zoom’ presentation that will be part of the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG) Online Education in Art Series – “Demystifying Public Art.”

aacg.public.art.wgs.studio.glass.sculpture.education.arts.community.involvement.michael.janis.erwin.timmers.contemporary.public

Public art created by artists of the Washington Glass Studio both enrich and celebrate diverse communities. Successful projects include – The Monumental Doors for the Library of Congress, Laurel Library, the Washington DC Gateway Arch, and the West Palm Beach International Airport.
Michael Janis and Erwin Timmers will discuss how they navigate the complex processes from finding the projects to their ultimate creation and installation.

On Tuesday, September 15, at 2 p.m. Eastern time, AACG starts their Online Education Series called “FIRED UP” - click on the link to register for the free event:

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYucemupz4jE9xI6GbpH6qoSHz7-iWuztOT?fbclid=IwAR0A-NoKAxTtkf6k12vBHvukn8IlUFRaY5uTfj97pj5yBBaA3-bsCO0abDc

The Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to further the development and appreciation of art made from glass.

The Alliance informs collectors, critics and curators by encouraging and supporting museum exhibitions, university glass departments and specialized teaching programs, regional collector groups, visits to private collections, and public seminars.

The Process: Public Art 900 Thayer in Silver Spring, MD – “Social Fabric”

Public art can strengthen social bonds, especially for culturally diverse neighborhoods.

Corner installation of "Social Fabric" public art at Fenton Apartments in Silver Spring, MD.

Corner installation of “Social Fabric” public art at Fenton Apartments in Silver Spring, MD.

Washington Glass Studio recently completed a public art project in Silver Spring, MD, for a new mixed use development at 900 Thayer Ave

The original 2005 design concept - cast glass panels helped define the architectural entrance to the development.

The original 2005 design concept – cast glass panels helped define the architectural entrance to the “Adele” development.

Washington Glass Studio began creating artwork options for developments on the site, starting in 2005, when the site first was being developed as a residential development called “The Adele”. After a review and approval by Montgomery County Arts Council, the project languished as the real estate market changed.

In 2013, WGS Studio began working with the developers that purchased that project site, Redbrick LMD. Working with the design team, WGS artists were inspired by the rich mixture of ethnic groups in Silver Spring. Imagery and patterns that were based on the cultural fabric and textiles, as well as indigenous weaving and embroidery patterns for tapestries, wraps, blankets and garments.

Fabrics & textiles of the cultures that make up the Silver Spring neighborhoods was the inspiration of the new artwork design for 900 Thayer.

Fabrics & textiles of the cultures that make up the Silver Spring neighborhoods was the inspiration of the new artwork design for 900 Thayer.

 

Artwork on the corner column made up of backlit glass panels would be a colorful reference to the cultures, and add a bright pop of color on the site.

The corner location of the artwork would also frame out the proposed future planned arts development that would be up the road from 900 Thayer, and the Montgomery County Review committee was keen on having the artwork go further – asking if the artwork could be extended all along the ground level of the new development. Happily, Redbrick Developers agreed, and the scope of the artwork was extended along the entire street level and apartment outdoor spaces.

The corner column at 900 Thayer was to have an 11 foot high tower of backlit panels mounted to the surfaces.

The corner column at 900 Thayer was to have an 11 foot high tower of backlit panels mounted to the surfaces.

The project stalled in 2015. In 2017, Chesapeake Realty Partners joined with Redbrick Developer and the Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County in moving forward with the property  proceeded with groundbreaking and construction of the development in June of 2018.

WGS Studio was contacted and engaged to fully develop the design. WGS revisited the idea of incorporating cultural textile and fabric patterns would encourage viewers to appreciate the colorful patterns enlivening the streetscape, as well as promoting a message of open-mindedness, promote tolerance and curiosity about other cultures.

The brightly colored hand-screened glass features patterns were artistically based on Ethiopian textiles, African mudcoths, Central American weavings, European folkloric fabric prints, intricate and colorful ancestral weaving designs from Asia, Native American blankets, and Colonial American quilt patterns. Using identity and culture as the main theme of the building’s public artwork, WGS sought to inspire self-reflection, human connection, and conversation.

Teri Bailey and Patricia De Poel Wilberg work on silkscreening the enamel patterns on glass, to be fired in the kilns after.

Teri Bailey and Patricia De Poel Wilberg work on silkscreening the enamel patterns on glass, to be fired in the kilns after.

The Washington Glass Studio team worked on the production of the glass artwork starting in early 2019. Large silkscreen panels were made to allow the patterns to be enameled and fired in the WGS kilns. WGS Co-Director Erwin Timmers worked on the LED design and integration of the glass artwork.

The enameled glass was fired to keep the high contrast color selections vibrant.

The enameled glass was fired to keep the high contrast color selections vibrant.

Over 60 18″ x 18″ panels were made – and were to be mounted in a variety of multi-panel arrangements.

The installation on site began in October of 2019, and as the building occupancy needed the artwork to be completed to allow for certification, a focused WGS team made short work of the outdoor artwork installation. 

Detail of one of the LED illuminated glass panels at 900 Thayer Ave.

Detail of one of the LED illuminated glass panels at 900 Thayer Ave.

WGS Co-Director Michael Janis is a vision in orange as he preps the LED mounts for the glass.

WGS Co-Director Michael Janis is a vision in orange as he preps the LED mounts for the glass.

WGS Co-Director Erwin Timmers sets the final glass artwork panels in the corner column at the 900 Thayer site.

WGS Co-Director Erwin Timmers sets the final glass artwork panels in the corner column at the 900 Thayer site.

The Fenton Apartment corner column artwork has a strong presence in the daytime, with the LED illumination.

The Fenton Apartment corner column artwork has a strong presence in the daytime, with the LED illumination.

Project Details
Location: 900 Thayer Avenue, Silver Spring MD, 20910
Washington Glass Studio Public Art Team: Michael Janis, Tim Tate, Erwin Timmers, Teri Bailey and Patricia De Poel Wilberg.

Peppermill Village at Night – The City of Lights!

Peppermill Community Center public art by Washington Glass Studio and the Peppermill/Landover community.

Peppermill Community Center public art by Washington Glass Studio and the Peppermill/Landover community.

Cassi Hayden, the Senior Visual Media Photographer for The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) was at Peppermill Village Community Center covering an event recently and found the artwork (made by Washington Glass Studio) in front to be exceptionally beautiful!

Detail of the internally illuminated glass panels made with the Peppermill community as part of the public artwork.

Detail of the internally illuminated glass panels made with the Peppermill community as part of the public artwork.

Cassi took some shots attached high-res files for your use.  All photos in this posting by: M-NCPPC/Cassi Hayden

The artwork reflects well in the glass of the new center - and on the community that inspired the creation!

The artwork reflects well in the glass of the new center – and on the community that inspired the creation!

Click HERE to see the public art sculpture in the daytime and how the work came to be!

Peppermill Community Center Public Art

Peppermill Community Center

Peppermill Community Center with the internally illuminated artwork “Telling Our Story…” by Washington Glass Studio.

The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) commissioned Washington Glass Studio (WGS) to create a public art sculpture for the new addition to the Peppermill Community Center in Landover, MD.

Shop drawing of sculpture by WGS.

Shop drawing of sculpture by WGS.

Some communities see public art as a way of enhancing or personalizing otherwise impersonal spaces. Others view it as a means to activate civic dialogue or provide a vehicle for the community to express its identity.

These landmarks and special events enhance our experience of a place and our quality of life. They engender a sense of pride and community identity. They reach audiences outside museums, galleries, and theaters, and they add to the beauty of everyday life. They declare the worth of a place and a time in our shared culture.

Erwin Timmers leads a community glass making workshop at the Washington Glass School.

Erwin Timmers leads a community glass making workshop at the Washington Glass School.

As such, the design of the site-specific sculpture by WGS was centered on finding ways to get the community excited and engaged with the convergence of art, history and community. The proposal for the art was based on a 15’H tower of glass and steel that would be internally illuminated with over 100 glass inset panels. The artwork of the insets were to be created by involving the community via a series of glass-making workshops held at the Washington Glass School

A great cross section of community came out to be part of the creation of the new public art for Peppermill Community Center.

A great cross section of community came out to be part of the creation of the new public art for Peppermill Community Center.

The residents and stakeholders were tasked with showing what they felt important to them and what inspired them were made. Images of family, nature, the environment, their neighborhoods, their sports teams were rendered in glass.

All sorts of imagery and glass techniques were employed to great effect.

All sorts of imagery and glass techniques were employed to great effect.

Cast glass images of the social groups – the sewing groups, the cheer squads, the state flag – even a Maryland blue crab were crafted. Historical references to the nearby horse farms and the old roller rink were included in the mix of glass panels. Part of the fun of the artwork is seeing how this mix of images and references all somehow work together.

The tower, titled :"Telling Our Story..." adds a powerfull and dramitic artistic element at the new entry at the community center.

The tower, titled :”Telling Our Story…” adds a powerful and dramatic artistic element at the new entry at the community center.

Shaping places—with landmarks and landscapes, events and ideologies—sets the stage for a critical part of our existence: our connection with our environment; with our past, present, and future; and with other human beings.

The mix of images and stories told create a compelling and inclusive mixture - each distinctive and unique - yet cohesive as a whole.

The mix of images and stories told create a compelling and inclusive mixture – each distinctive and unique – yet cohesive as a whole.

“Telling Our Story…”
Artist: Washington Glass Studio
Project Team: Teri Bailey, Michael Janis, Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate and Lee Kind.
Media: Cast and fused glass, steel, LED lighting, concrete.
Location: Peppermill Community Center, 610 Hill Rd, Landover, MD 20785
Client: The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

WGS Artist John Henderson Creates Baltimore Public Art

WGS Resident Artist, John Henderson, has been creating artwork that enriches the Baltimore area.

WGS Resident Artist, John Henderson, has been creating artwork that enriches the Baltimore area.

Holy Nativity/St. John’s Development Corporation received a competitive Neighborhood Initiative Competitive Grant from Baltimore City to install outdoor sculptures along Park Heights Avenue, in Baltimore City.

John Henderson has been creating public art as part of a beautification initiative targeting vacant lots and communities undergoing redevelopment.

John Henderson has been creating public art as part of a beautification initiative targeting vacant lots and communities undergoing redevelopment.

The Project “Arts on the Avenue” is a place-based public art beautification initiative targeting vacant lots and communities undergoing redevelopment.  Artists will design and paint Ndebele design motifs on transparent panels that will be inserted into a steel frame.  Ndebele design originates from South Africa and is still practiced today. The Ndebele technique is primarily geometric using vibrant colors and symbols.

Each sculptural steel frame will contain a solar device that will provide illumination at sunset.

Each sculptural steel frame will contain a solar device that will provide illumination at sunset.

 

John Henderson

John Henderson

John Henderson, a studio artist at the WGS and resident of Maryland, is leading this project.  John and fellow artist Sean Hennessey recently completed an outdoor obelisk titled “Inspire” through a BOPA/Lots Alive competitive grant from Baltimore City. 

Arts & Healing at Inova Schar Cancer Institute

The dedication of the Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, VA took place Monday, July 8.

artwork collection glass

Inova Schar Cancer Institute located at 8081 Innovation Park Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031

The Arts & Healing Program at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute, a department of Inova Fairfax Hospital, is a collaboration with the Smith Center for Healing and the Arts, and uses art in its many forms to help support people in treatment and recovery and their loved ones. This innovative program includes a robust permanent art collection and ongoing exhibitions, performing arts events, and other workshops.

Opening dedication ceremony of the Arts & Healing program at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute.

Opening dedication ceremony of the Arts & Healing program at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute.

The Arts & Healing Program is a resource for families, loved ones and the community to support Inova Schar’s core mission and philosophy to provide patient-centered care. New acquisitions and special site-specific artworks many DC area artists – including WGS’ Michael Janis, Tim Tate, and Allegra Marquart are in the new collection as well as works by Foon Sham, Valerie Theberge, Alan Binstock, Wendy Ross, and Susan Hostetler. 

Artists Alan Binstock and Valerie Theberge with Arts Director Shanti Norris.

Artists Alan Binstock and Valerie Theberge with Arts Director Shanti Norris.

 

Sculpture by Foon Sham at the new Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, VA.

Sculpture by Foon Sham at the new Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, VA.

The Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery at Inova Schar Cancer Institute is dedicated to exhibiting fine art that explores the innate connection between healing and creativity. Through a rotating exhibition schedule, the gallery features contemporary artists that address a diversity of significant themes, including spirituality, social change, multiculturalism, health, environmentalism and community.

One of the large commissioned artworks is a site-specific installation work by glass sculptor Michael Janis. The Washington Glass School blog has asked Michael to outline the work’s meanings and the processes he used to create the monumental recognition wall.

 

Dwight Schar Recognition Wall at Inova Schar Cancer Institute

Dwight Schar Recognition Wall at Inova Schar Cancer Institute

Inspired by the story of Dwight Schar, founder and chairman of homebuilding and mortgage giant NVR, and donation by he and his wife to develop the cancer research institute that now bears their names, I worked at creating glass pieces that have both visual and spatial depth. Mr Schar’s mother died very young, lacking of good healthcare, and Mr Schar saw the creation of a cancer center and affording them the equipment and facilities needed to advance their treatments and research as a way to repay the community that supported his home building company.

Artist Michael Janis talks to the tour group about his unusual glass technique.

Artist Michael Janis talks to the tour group about his unusual glass technique.

 

The artwork installation is a tribute to his history and largesse. A rendering of Dwight Schar made of crushed glass powder overlaps cast glass squares that depict references homes and community, as well as the advancements that science and research could bring to the world. In the center of the artwork installation, cancer awareness ribbons are the focal point, in its natural clear state, allowing all symbolic cancer awareness colors to be seen within. The end framing panels are a special iridescent glass that has many colors that shift intensity depending on the viewer perspective.

Inova Schar Center made in kiln-cast glass.

Inova Schar Cancer Institute fired in kiln-cast glass.

The central portrait of Mr Schar is made from crushed black glass powder. The fine powder was carefully manipulated with scalpel and brushes to form the detailed likeness and took many hours and kiln firings to complete. 

The clear glass ribbons have become the symbol of the new Inova Schar Institute – and Washington Glass School was later commissioned to make smaller versions of the ribbons as commemorative sculptures for valued benefactors and volunteers to the new Cancer Center. inova.schar.glass.ribbon.award

Lisa Ellis receives recognition for her work in creating the arts program at Inova Schar Institute.

Lisa Ellis receives recognition for her work in creating the arts program at Inova Schar Institute.

Public Art for Peppermill Community Center Brings Residents to Washington Glass School

Peppermill Village's new community center will feature a glass and steel sculpture inset with glass artwork made by the community.

Peppermill Village’s new community center will feature a glass and steel sculpture inset with glass artwork made by the community.

Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC), Department of Parks and Recreation awarded Washington Glass Studio the commission to design, fabricate and install a work of art in the form of a sculpture that has the potential to become a landmark for the Peppermill Community. The new soaring glass and steel structure will be internally illuminated and feature glass panels made by the Peppermill community. The first of three planned community glass-making workshops took place this weekend at the Washington Glass School.

The Washington Glass School was filled with residents of Peppermill Village, MD - all making glass and having a great time!

The Washington Glass School was filled with residents of Peppermill Village, MD – all making glass and having a great time!

We will post more photos of the workshops and the progress of the sculpture as the work proceeds!

Everyone got into expressing themselves in glass and telling their story for the public art sculpture.

Everyone got into expressing themselves in glass and telling their story for the public art sculpture.

Co-Director Erwin Timmers enthuses about fused glass to the Peppermill group.

Co-Director Erwin Timmers enthuses about fused glass to the Peppermill group.

Demystifying Public Art Symposium at UMUC

washington.glass.school.studio.public.art.symposium.community.based.solution.newM-NCPPC/Prince George’s County Department of Parks and Recreation/Arts and Cultural Heritage Division; Prince George’s Arts and Humanities Council; and University of Maryland University College Arts Program invite artists and other art professionals to a two-day symposium:

Demystifying Public Art

February 16–17, 2019

Public art—art outside traditional galleries or museums—is present everywhere, but many artists have limited knowledge of the various factors involved in participating in public art projects. The goal of this symposium is to demystify the process by bringing together people active in the public art field to address these factors.

The first day provides an introduction to public art through panel discussions geared to all levels of artistic experience. The second day offers a deeper dive into specific components of public art projects. Special closing events will take place on both days. This symposium will give attendees the opportunity to network and connect with presenters and each other.

Selected Panel Topics

  • Sponsors of Public Art
  • What Every Public Artist Needs to Know
  • Access and Entry Points: Testimonials of Various Artists
  • Public Art Resources
  • Public Art as the Art of Collaboration
  • Public Art Solicitation and Budget Documents
  • From Proposal to Fabrication: Making Public Art
  • Public Art and Community Engagement

Registration and on-site parking are free, but space is limited.

Click HERE to register online.

For more information, e-mail or go to:

Alec Simpson at Alec.Simpson@pgparks.com or arts.pgparks.com
Rhonda Dallas at rdallas@pgahc.org or pgahc.org
Eric Key at eric.key@umuc.edu or umuc.edu/art

Location

University of Maryland University College
3501 University Boulevard East, Room 2001
Adelphi, MD 20783 | Directions

Sean Hennessy & John Henderson “Inspire” Public Art Sculpture

“Inspire” public art sculpture by Sean Hennessey and John Henderson for Baltimore's Lots Alive Outdoor Community Art Program.

“Inspire” public art sculpture by Sean Hennessey and John Henderson for Baltimore’s Lots Alive Outdoor Community Art Program.

The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts and the Baltimore Office of Sustainability’s Baltimore Green Network outdoor community art program, “Lots Alive” sought the creation of temporary outdoor artworks sited on vacant lots along Baltimore’s Park Heights Ave. Designed in partnership with Mayor Catherine E. Pugh’s Baltimore Green Network, the “Lots Alive” project aims to breathe life into underutilized vacant spaces through creative interventions. Six artists were selected and Sean Hennessey and John Henderson collaborated (as H&H Collective) on a cast glass and steel sculpture titled ‘Inspire’. 

Artist Sean Hennessey installs the sculpture on site.

Artist Sean Hennessey installs the sculpture “Inspire” on site.

The work created is an internally illuminated, four-sided obelisk with panels mounted into the framework. Using cast glass, Sean and John have created a strong sculpture for Baltimore. John created dimensional imagery using Adinkra symbols. For Sean – the work is a bit of a farewell love letter to Baltimore as he moves to Seattle. This is one of the only pieces Sean had shown in Baltimore City since his first solo show in 2006. His narrative concept for the artwork story was to have the bottom panels on the sculpture represent a wanting or dream, with the upper panels represent fulfillment.

Detail of cast glass inset panel in H&H Collective sculpture "Inspire".

Detail of cast glass inset panel in H&H Collective sculpture “Inspire”.

The sculpture has solar powered LED lighting to make the artwork command attention at night. The artwork is located at 4215 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, MD.

View of sculpture "Inspire" located at 4215 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD.

View of sculpture “Inspire” located at 4215 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD.

WGS On Camera

Washington Glass School was approached by a new residential development in the area – Studio 3807 – to talk about how Washington Glass School connects with community. Directors Tim Tate and Michael Janis talked with the film crew about the public art created by the Studio: