Lampworking Class Gets Hot!

>

Photos by Mike Raman

The Washington Glass School’s new torchworking classes started off Session A in fine form. The hands-on class works thru the basics of making objects on the torch. Here instructor Robert Kincheloe works with each student to master using borosilicate glass.

Teddie Hathaway heats up her glass skills.

The next beginner’s lampworking class starts in June – Click HERE to read more about the class & schedule.

Memorial Day

>



The Good Soldier by Michael Janis

2005, fused glass powder imagery

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.


We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved, and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.


Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

“In Flanders Fields” is one of the most notable poems written about World War 1. Canadian physician and Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae wrote it in May 1915, after he witnessed the death of his friend, Lieutenant Alexis Helmer, 22 years old, the day before.



In 1918, inspired by the poem, Moina Michael replied with her own poem:

We cherish too, the Poppy red

That grows on fields where valor led,

It seems to signal to the skies

That blood of heroes never dies.


Jumping The Shark In Washington, DC

>

The sights one sees on the streets of Washington, DC.
Here is what appeared in front of the National Geographic building on 17th in NW today.
Not sure what event/broadcast this relates to, and I could not find any reference on the Nat Geographic website – so just enjoy the notion of sharks cruising the streets of the Nation’s Capital.


We’re going to need a bigger boat.

Glass Line Magazine: Q & A with Paul Stankard

>The May issue of Glass Line magazine has an article by legendary flameworker Paul Stankard, where Paul had sought questions from other lampworkers and the article creates the feeling of a casual discussion with one of the glass greats. Below is a short excerpt from the article:

Sharing a Journey: Questions and Answers - by Paul Stankard –
Over the last two years, I’ve met a large number of borosilicate flameworkers making everything from jewelry to glass pipes who are yearning to do significant creative work and explore new boundaries. They have a strong commitment to the independent lifestyle as studio artists and many make their livings through their highly developed skills. They are not satisfied with staying in one creative place and have larger ambitions. I relate to their struggle to channel their technical abilities into something more significant by creating sculpture. What’s holding many of them back, however, is a lack of artistic maturity. Few of them went to art school, and they are often simply unaware of what is considered important work by the larger world of collectors, galleries, and museum curators.

What I’ve been promoting with these Glass Line articles is excellence, but the notion of “excellence” is defined by the community you belong to. You can be an excellent goblet-maker, an excellent paperweight-maker, an excellent beadmaker, and on and on. To be excellent in these tightly defined categories, you need to recognize what is masterwork and be familiar with the skilled artists and craftspeople advancing the tradition with whom you want to strive to compete. You then can take advantage of the respect you’ve achieved in these decorative-arts categories to catapult yourself into the greater glass community. By competing with the past and matching the category’s history, you’ll be at the front of your field.
Our resident torchwork artist, Robert Kincheloe is one of the artists that is featured in the article with Paul.

If you are a subscriber to the magazine, you can read the article online – click HERE.

Washington, DC’s Newest Art Gallery Opens

>

Gallery 555 Opening Night
photos by Painterly Visions /Anne Marchand


Gallery 555 opened with a flourish this past weekend, with a fantastic exhibition of paintings by Michelle Cormier. Also on exhibit are some great glass pieces by Erwin Timmers, wood pieces by Bruce Fransen, and encaustic works by Ellyn Weiss, amongst other works.

Ellyn Weiss chats up the opening night crowd.

Erwin Timmers works the crowds.

Gallerista Jodi Walsh.


Gallery 555 is located in the lobby of 555 12th Street, NW, Washington, DC
202.393.1409

Upcoming Class in the "Lost Wax" Process

>

One of the most sought after glass techniques – Lost Wax Casting is coming soon to the Washington Glass School!
This is a great way to make 3-D elements in kilncast glass. Think of the sculptural possibilities!
Glass guru Tim Tate uses this technique to make sculptural glass elements that are part of his blown & cast glass reliquary artworks. The detail and control of of the form allows for the creation incredible works of art.


A view of some of Tim Tate’s cast glass elements made with the lost wax process.

Our instructor for this class, Debra Ruzinsky, was on the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) faculty as Asst Professor of Glass, and has just come back from teaching this technique at the Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass.

Debra Ruzinsky works with the students on preparing the plaster encasement.

Have a look at the course description below – this could be the most interesting class you take this year!

Class 1021 – Basics of Lost Wax Casting
In this 3 day class we will make a sculptural vessel form in the “lost wax” method. Students will begin with a pre-made wax form that they learn to carve and alter. Students are asked to research surface design ideas prior to starting, bringing sketches, magazine clippings, xerox’s, etc.

No experience is necessary (wear clothing that can get messy and closed toed shoes).


Example of student lost wax work.

Click HERE to see photos from last year’s class in the lost wax process.

Habatat Michigan Gallery Awards DC Artist

>Michigan’s Habatat Gallery – one of the oldest and largest glass galleries in the United States. Habatat just had their 38th International Glass Invitational where over 90 artists from 16 countries were showcased. This year, there was a competitive component – a distinguished jury of art critics, curators and directors of museums selected 25 artists for awards. Washington Glass School’s Tim Tate was one of the artists selected by juror Tim Close, Director of the Tacoma Museum of Glass. Tim’s artwork will be featured in a museum exhibition and a hard cover book as part of his prize. Congratulations Tim!

Time Tate

TIM TATE

Petrovic & Tate Talk!

>New York’s Museum of Arts And Design current exhibition Dead or Alive features a collaborative artwork piece by Marc Petrovic and Tim Tate.


Apothecarium Moderne by Tim Tate & Marc Petrovic
photograph by Anything Photographic


The two artists discuss their collaboration and the story behind the artwork in a video made by the Museum of Arts and Design.

Click on image to jump to video of Tim Tate & Marc Petrovic.

Tim Tate Slave Dance

>Way back in 2006, the Washington, DC 48 Hour Film Project had all 99 competitors make a 5 minute movie – write, film, edit, score – all in 48 hours. A constant character, a prop, a line of dialogue and genre had to be incorporated into each movie. In 2006, the character in each submitted movie was “Tim Tate – glass sculptor extraordinaire” – and the character could be depicted in any manner. The name refers to the Washington Glass School’s director Tim Tate, but how the character was used and portrayed was up to each competitor.

One group submitting a film, the Resilient Young Asian Network, had a film titled “YourSpace” – and had a very funny use of the character “Tim Tate”.

In one scene’s background, an unnamed slave dancer dressed in black performs for the film’s Tim Tate character. He became an instant favorite – and his dance moves have been repeated at various art openings.

Click Here to see the full 5 minute movie “YourSpace” by the Resilient Young Asian Network.
Click Here to find more about the 48 Hour Film Festival.


click on image below to jump to film segment

Young Guns: Glass Blowers

>Michael Raman started lampworking, blowing and fusing glass at age 11, at GlassRoots – a NJ glass studio.
Located in Newark, NJ,
GlassRoots was founded in January 2001 with the belief that communities can be transformed and elevated through the arts. Its mission statement is toprovide multiple opportunities for at-risk youth, ages 10-18, to realize their potential through the creation of glass art. As the only non-profit “hot shop” for young people in the greater New York metropolitan area, GlassRoots provides a nurturing environment in which otherwise underserved children can achieve self-esteem and creative expression while also learning basic business skills and valuable life lessons through the exploration of the unique art forms of glass making.”

When Michael was 13, his family moved to the DC area, and he sought out the glass blowing facilities at
DC GlassWorks, where he impressed the owner Dave D’Orio with his skill and focus.

Michael Raman’s blown glass.

Now 15 years old, Michael assisted Marc Petrovic when he was here for the James Renwick Alliance workshop.

Mike Raman catching Marc Petrovic’s blown trout.

DC GlassWorks just had an Open House, where the young Michael worked with an even younger glassblower – a 12 year old named Logan – shown here working on his first piece. One can’t be but impressed with the enthusiasm, intensity of focus and skill of these young’uns ( babies actually!).

Click here to jump to Michael’s website.
Click here to jump to youtube video of Michael in action – doing a reticello bowl no less!