Tim Tate & Joyce Scott = 😍 The Art of Glass

Goya Contemporary – where for the past 25 years has built a progressive reputation for creating visionary, historically relevant exhibitions, features glass artists Joyce Scott and Tim Tate together in a show titled “Now: Collaborations by Joyce J Scott and Tim Tate“. The centerpiece of the show is a 9ft long cast glass wall entitled “Now”. This was a 7-month project with Joyce and Tim that deals with societal issues that were being discussed in our culture while we were producing it. Issues included racism, homophobia, misogyny and the war in Ukraine.

Goya Contemporary

Mill Centre Studio 214, 3000 Chestnut Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21211

NOW: Collaborations by Joyce J. Scott and Tim Tate
Reception: April 20, 2024, 4:00 – 6:00 pm
April 12- June 12, 2024

Join The Artists: The Art of Glass at ARTOMATIC

Join the Artomatic Glass Reception on April 26th and meet with artists from what Washington Post Arts Critic Mark Jenkins called “…internationally renowned arts group, the Washington Glass School.” In the galleries: Artomatic: Unpretentious, approachable, convivial – Washington Post, April 5, 2024
There will be artists talking of their works and inspirations, nibblies, and fun glass prizes!

Come and see how the DC area has become the Awakening Force of Glass… or at least the Rebel Alliance!

ARTOMATIC 2024 2100 M Street NW, Washington, DC 20037

Washington Post on the DC Glass Scene Seen at Artomatic

Washington Post article on 2024 Artomatic exhibit

Great review of Artomatic culture event in the Washington Post. Art critic Mark Jenkins enjoys the all-sorts arts experience and singles out the glass art for comment, including using WGS artist Michael Janis’ artwork titled “Waiting for the Moments that Never Come” as the illustrative work for the show. Writes Mark:

“…Among the various business and governmental sponsors of this year’s Artomatic is a small but internationally renowned arts group, the Washington Glass School. The Mount Rainier, Md., studio has taken a large chunk of the building’s fifth floor to showcase the elegant creations of co-founders Tim Tate and Erwin Timmers and several other glass virtuosos. Tate, who credits Artomatic with playing a significant role in his career, is showing a sculpture that riffs on Leonardo da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man.” The provocatively androgynous update positions eight glass figures — male, female and combined — in a circle surrounded by mirrors and lights that simulate a sense of endless replication…”

In the galleries: Artomatic: Unpretentious, approachable, convivial – Review by Mark Jenkins, Washington Post, April 5, 2024

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/art/2024/04/05/art-gallery-shows-dc-area/

By contrast – have a read about how the Washington Post art critic Blake Gopnik thought of the 2004 Artomatic exhibit:

…”The result is the second-worst display of art I’ve ever seen. The only one to beat it out, by the thinnest of split hairs, was the 2002 Artomatic, which was worse only by virtue of being even bigger and in an even more atrocious space, down by the waterfront in a vacant modern office building. I won’t dwell on the art. And I certainly won’t name names…There may just be a few decent things hidden in the mix — with so many thousands of objects on display, the law of averages says there must be. But three hours’ worth of looking didn’t spot too many. Some of the glasswork looked all right. (Glass is such a gorgeous medium it’s hard to screw it up, and you need some basic training even to begin to work in it.)

Artomatic 2004: Hanging Is Too Good for It by Blake Gopnik

November 10, 2004

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/2004/11/11/artomatic-2004-hanging-is-too-good-for-it/353b4ecd-8d74-475b-9386-63d5acd048db/

Artomatic runs thru April 28th. 2100 M Street, NW, Washington, DC.