Washington Post Reviews Michael Janis Solo @ Littleton Gallery

The Washington Post published the following review of Michael Janis’ solo show “Echoes of Leaves and Shadows” being exhibited at the Maurine Littleton Gallery through Oct 15. Art critic Mark Jenkins  describes Michael’s skill as “extraordinary. Jenkins also enthuses that Janis’ glass artwork combines “the stateliness of stained-glass windows with the vivacity of pop art”. Have a read of the full text below:

Michael Janis. "Radiance," 2016, glass, glass powder imagery, steel; on view at Maurine Littleton Gallery. (Michael Janis/Maurine Littleton Gallery)

Michael Janis. “Radiance,” 2016, glass, glass powder imagery, steel; on view at Maurine Littleton Gallery. (Michael Janis/Maurine Littleton Gallery)

By Mark Jenkins October 8, 2016

Michael Janis

If Michael Janis worked with pencil or charcoal, his draftsmanship would be impressive. But the D.C. artist draws photorealist portraits with pulverized glass, placing the powder exactly with tiny tools. Which is extraordinary.

Most of the pieces in “Echoes of Leaves and Shadows,” at Maurine Littleton Gallery, include depictions of pretty young women. These gamines, who might be ballerinas or French New Wave stars, are rendered in granulated black glass fused by heat to clear glass sheets. The pieces aren’t just black-and-clear, though. Janis overlays and underlies patches of translucent colored glass, and often adds such 3-D glass elements as butterflies or flower petals. Aqua and orange are common in this array, among other hues. In one picture, an abstract yellow-green swirl contrasts the subject’s slightly darker green eyes.

Janis employs many variations, slicing faces into three equal parts or contrasting them with panels of textured glass. There are ceramic busts garlanded with glass leaves, and portraits embellished with near-opaque peacock- or dark-blue circles. The latter combine the stateliness of stained-glass windows with the vivacity of pop art — half medieval cathedral, half 1960s Vogue.

Michael Janis: Echoes of Leaves and Shadows On view through Oct. 15 at Maurine Littleton Gallery, 1667 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-333-9307. littletongallery.com.

Michael Janis Featured in Glass Art Magazine Podcast

Glass Art Magazine has a podcast series aptly named “Talking Out Your Glass” that features interviews and discussions with world-renowned glass artists. WGS’ Michael Janis joins the series as he talks about how he does his glass powder drawings and his upcoming solo show at Georgetown’s Maurine Littleton Gallery.

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click above to listen to podcast

Michael’s solo exhibit titled “Echoes of Leaves and Shadows” features his new glass works and sculptures and opens Friday, September 16, 2016. 

 

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Michael Janis, “Radiance”;2016; fused glass, glass powder imagery, steel; 12.5″ x 12.5″

Michael Janis: Echoes of Leaves and Shadows

Maurine Littleton Gallery

1667 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Washington, DC 20007

 

Sept 16 – Oct 15, 2016

Opening Reception Friday, September 16, 6-8pm

Glass Art Magazine podcast link – click HERE

 

Drawing On Glass

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Nancy Donnelly uses underglaze pencils to create fused glass drawings.

Working in the glass school, Nancy Donnelly creates fused glass drawings and sketches. Originally a painter, Nancy likes to explore ways to bring her “painterly aspects” into glass. Using underglaze crayons and pencils, Nancy works at getting a loose ‘sketch’ feel into her glass artwork.

The use of underglaze pencil allows Nancy to retain her detail and her quality of sketch in the art.





Nancy likes the expressive qualities of the sketch.
Nancy is able to capture the personality of the subject.

Examples of Nancy’s artwork can be seen in Foundry Gallery in DC’s Dupont Circle neighborhood. Nancy will have a solo show there this coming October 3 – 28th, 2012.

Foundry Gallery, 1314 18th St NW, WDC

Michael Janis Does (Hot Glass) Houston

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Washington Glass School’s own “Magic Mike” was just down in Houston – performing for the ladies out at the Hot Glass Houston (HGH) – a Bullseye glass Resource Center in Texas.

Michael Janis exposed all his secrets during his weekend review at club Hot Glass Houston. He happily line dances and pole dances (where he got the nickname “Magic Mike”), yet remains mum about what happened at the HGH karoke night…

Michael said there were many ‘naturals’ in the class that took to the sgraffito technique instantly, and HGH’s Bob Paterson sent some photos from the class - 

Michael Janis outlines frit powder sgraffito process to the class.

In the three-day workshop, the artists created imagery using frit powder, enamels, image transfer, stencils, high-fire pens and paints, and later worked at creating depth by kiln-forming a stacked image panel.

TA Cynthia Gilkey sifts frit powder to recreate her puppy Bob in glass.
Bob after his time in a kiln.
Michael demonstrates how to manipulate frit powder. Its so easy!
Hot Glass Houston kilns fill with image laden sheets of glass.
Lynda Stoy’s frit powder sketch awaits kiln firing.
Layered panel component sheets by Marilyn Dishman, Lynda Stoy and  Deborah Enderle are fired to fix the frit powder on the glass and allow for further embellishment.
The class dams each layered imagery panel prior to full fuse firing.
Catherine Coffman assembles her layered panel in the kiln and creates a dam surround.
After firing.
Brooke Colvin’s romantic panel after clean up.
Liz Paul’s glass artwork references a walk thru the woods.

Michael said he had a great time in Texas, and he enjoyed hanging out with the owner Bob Paterson and TA Cynthia Gilkey – although he mentioned a karaoke night debacle, he refused to give details. Click here to jump to Hot Glass Houston’s facebook page. Click HERE to jump to Hot Glass Houston’s website.

Michael Janis Goes West!

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photos by Demetra Theofanous

An earlier WGS blog post mentions that our own master of glass imagery – Michael Janis – was heading out west to teach a series of workshops at California’s Bay Area Glass Institute (BAGI).
Michael’s workshops were about integrating imagery into glass – one workshop was creating deep bas-relief and in the other workshop he taught how he does his unique frit powder drawing technique.
Below are some photos of the California workshops:

Making clear and color bas-relief samples.

The students try out working in the plaster molds.

Mark adds color to his work; a student’s work shows the cast glass bristles of a paintbrush.

BAGI Executive Director Mark Murai is amazed at the detail captured by the kilnformed glass.

Michael Janis describes what goes on inside the glass during the firing.

Michael reveals all his secrets in how to use frit powder for drawing and how the layers of glass create the depth of the work.

Michael said he had really enjoyed working at BAGI’s facilities: “It’d be my new home… it has that experimental vibe – where as an artist you can really respond and can take your work the next level.”

Click HERE to jump to BAGI’s website.

Imagery In Glass Class

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Instructor Michael Janis explains how imagery can be fused into glass.

Class 1005 – Imagery in Glass was alot of fun this weekend, a great way to celebrate the end of the blizzard weather the DC metro area has been suffering thru. The class dove right in learning how to use glass frit powder, high temperature enamels, stencils, glass paints and fused glass photo-imagery.


Michael Janis outlines the sgraffito technique


Michael is assisted by artists Chris Shea and Dave Pearcy.


Hands on practice is the best way to learn any new process.

all photos by Tracy Lee