Peppermill Community Center Public Art

Peppermill Community Center

Peppermill Community Center with the internally illuminated artwork “Telling Our Story…” by Washington Glass Studio.

The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) commissioned Washington Glass Studio (WGS) to create a public art sculpture for the new addition to the Peppermill Community Center in Landover, MD.

Shop drawing of sculpture by WGS.

Shop drawing of sculpture by WGS.

Some communities see public art as a way of enhancing or personalizing otherwise impersonal spaces. Others view it as a means to activate civic dialogue or provide a vehicle for the community to express its identity.

These landmarks and special events enhance our experience of a place and our quality of life. They engender a sense of pride and community identity. They reach audiences outside museums, galleries, and theaters, and they add to the beauty of everyday life. They declare the worth of a place and a time in our shared culture.

Erwin Timmers leads a community glass making workshop at the Washington Glass School.

Erwin Timmers leads a community glass making workshop at the Washington Glass School.

As such, the design of the site-specific sculpture by WGS was centered on finding ways to get the community excited and engaged with the convergence of art, history and community. The proposal for the art was based on a 15’H tower of glass and steel that would be internally illuminated with over 100 glass inset panels. The artwork of the insets were to be created by involving the community via a series of glass-making workshops held at the Washington Glass School

A great cross section of community came out to be part of the creation of the new public art for Peppermill Community Center.

A great cross section of community came out to be part of the creation of the new public art for Peppermill Community Center.

The residents and stakeholders were tasked with showing what they felt important to them and what inspired them were made. Images of family, nature, the environment, their neighborhoods, their sports teams were rendered in glass.

All sorts of imagery and glass techniques were employed to great effect.

All sorts of imagery and glass techniques were employed to great effect.

Cast glass images of the social groups – the sewing groups, the cheer squads, the state flag – even a Maryland blue crab were crafted. Historical references to the nearby horse farms and the old roller rink were included in the mix of glass panels. Part of the fun of the artwork is seeing how this mix of images and references all somehow work together.

The tower, titled :"Telling Our Story..." adds a powerfull and dramitic artistic element at the new entry at the community center.

The tower, titled :”Telling Our Story…” adds a powerful and dramatic artistic element at the new entry at the community center.

Shaping places—with landmarks and landscapes, events and ideologies—sets the stage for a critical part of our existence: our connection with our environment; with our past, present, and future; and with other human beings.

The mix of images and stories told create a compelling and inclusive mixture - each distinctive and unique - yet cohesive as a whole.

The mix of images and stories told create a compelling and inclusive mixture – each distinctive and unique – yet cohesive as a whole.

“Telling Our Story…”
Artist: Washington Glass Studio
Project Team: Teri Bailey, Michael Janis, Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate and Lee Kind.
Media: Cast and fused glass, steel, LED lighting, concrete.
Location: Peppermill Community Center, 610 Hill Rd, Landover, MD 20785
Client: The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

Queer Glass : A Personal History

In honor of Pride month, WGS is sharing Tim Tate’s essay on the early days of Queer Glass. In this post, we will share Tim’s writing and include many images of Tim’s work starting in the 90’s. 

Tim Tate: Queer Glass

I’ve heard the term “Queer Glass” being used lately, which completely excites me! Meegan Coll’s “Transparency.” LGBTQ exhibit at the Liberty Museum last year, Jan Smith’s Bergstrom-Mahler Museum of Glass, Reflecting Perspectives: Artists Confront Social Issues of Diversity and Inclusion and Susie Silbert’s (Curator of Modern and Contemporary Glass at The Corning Museum of Glass) upcoming seminar discussion in October ( thank you Meegan and Susie!). This makes me want to cheer from the roof tops. Thank you to Meegan for curating that first show, and thank you to Susie for being the first institution to use the term Queer Glass.

One of Tim Tate's  earliest glass pieces from the mid 90’s. Said Tim of the work: "I lost 9 friends to AIDS in one year. This bowl with 9 angels covered by positive symbols was my tribute."

One of Tim Tate’s earliest glass pieces from the mid 90’s. Said Tim of the work: “I lost 9 friends to AIDS in one year. This bowl with 9 angels covered by positive symbols was my tribute.”

One of the reasons I’m happy about this is that it gave me a reason to compile a history of my own Queer Glass, an excessive I had never undertaken. There are a few more reasons as well.
In 1990 I began taking glass classes at Penland School of Crafts. I went there to heal by creating. A few years earlier I received a terminal diagnosis: I was told that I had one year to live; I was a gay man who had AIDS. I embraced glass at that time so that I would at least die as the artist that I had wanted to be, rather than my former job…the job that everyone else thought that I should have.
In this 2-week class I met another gay man who was a very nice guy. I didn’t come out to him right away, as I was going to do it later that week. Before I could, however, this young man went to another well-known glass artists studio, covered the ground with newspapers, and fatally shot himself in the head.
I was not to meet another gay man in glass for the next 15 years.

Tim Tate, "The Fulcrum of Heaven" , 24”h, forged steel and glass; 2002. Said Tim: "As an HIV+ gay man I was frequently told I was going to hell. I wasn’t as sure. You spun this piece to show which hereafter you were destined for. Angels in the blue, devils in the red. It sold to a preacher, which I somehow liked."

Tim Tate, “The Fulcrum of Heaven” , 24”h, forged steel and glass; 2002. Said Tim: “As an HIV+ gay man I was frequently told I was going to hell. I wasn’t as sure. You spun this piece to show which hereafter you were destined for. Angels in the blue, devils in the red. It sold to a preacher, which I somehow liked.”

I had no idea at that time just how scarce gay people were in the world of fine art glass. It was a hetero-normative art form. They are still scarce, though things are getting better. Frequently when I mention this fact to people, they start telling me the names of gay people they knew of (almost always the same 5 or 6 names). Comparing this list to the number of heterosexual glass artists is ridiculous. If anyone else was making direct queer work back then I would love to hear from you. 
I had heard of several gay women artists, and eventually heard of a few gay men. Thank God for them! It always gave me hope. But being a gay person making glass sculpture does not mean that you make Queer Art. I believe Queer Art should address the concerns of gay people. They should be fighting issues that stand in our way towards equality. At least to me, they should also be identified as Queer Art… no “passing” allowed! I’m just happy that we live in a time when we can publicly embrace the word queer to re-empower ourselves.

Tim Tate; "Positive Fractals" 36" x 36" x 6";Blown Glass, Mirror, Silvering, Paint, Steel, 2002. Said Tim of this work: "I used these fractals to try to make sense of the HIV in my bloodstream and what it was doing to me."

Tim Tate; “Positive Fractals” 36″ x 36″ x 6″;Blown Glass, Mirror, Silvering, Paint, Steel, 2002. Said Tim of this work: “I used these fractals to try to make sense of the HIV in my bloodstream and what it was doing to me.”

The queer issues then centered around HIV, marriage equality, violence towards gay men and women, all vast civil rights. Today’s issues seem to be centered around getting acceptance of family, civil rights (still), political advancement and keeping the extreme right at bay in order to keep the rights that we now have. So – as I waited to meet other queer men in glass, I made my art. 
To be clear, there were other queer people making art…but not glass art. So, I began on my own. I never saw another piece of queer glass until the Liberty Museum’s “Transparency” show last year. What a delight to meet others embracing their self-identities for all to see!

Tim Tate; "Two Paths Taken" ;Blown Glass, Found Objects, Original Text; 18"x10"x10"; 2004. Said Tim: "On the inner dome is the etched story of how my life changed after becoming HIV+. On the outer dome is my fantasy of what my life would have been like if things had been different. Both lives have their pros and cons. What I lost in one narrative I gained even more back in the second. The magic 8 ball in the center references the role that chance played in my life."

Tim Tate; “Two Paths Taken” ;Blown Glass, Found Objects, Original Text; 18″x10″x10″; 2004. Said Tim: “On the inner dome is the etched story of how my life changed after becoming HIV+. On the outer dome is my fantasy of what my life would have been like if things had been different. Both lives have their pros and cons. What I lost in one narrative I gained even more back in the second. The magic 8 ball in the center references the role that chance played in my life.”

The vast majority of my queer work goes back to 1992 to 1999, when I was the founder and director of the Triangle Artists Group (TAG) in Washington, DC…. which at one time boasted over 200 members who curated over 40 shows. Most notable was a show curated by Ruth Trevarrow entitled, “Too Queer”, which examined society’s homophobia and our own internalized homophobia. We worked with art and what was then called the “Prison Project” (concerning how gay people at that time were 3 times more likely to be incarcerated and 10 times more likely to be sexually abused in prison). AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) played an important role among many TAG members. We were fighting to stay alive. 
As such, this was the soup in which I swam. I was an HIV+ gay man surrounded by the politics and artistic expression of our times. I just never saw or experienced any queer glass art, other than my own. I saw the creation of this type of issue driven art as healing to me. Not only healing in the act of creating, but also healing for the viewers who shared these issues. Loss and healing became the main theme of many of my works. In one year alone, I went to 9 funerals. My friends, my partners… my world – was dying before my eyes. It was impossible for us to stay silent. HIV and Matthew Shepard’s death defined the late 90’s. Either a faceless disease or homophobic murderers were going to kill us. This seemed to be the worst time in the last century to be gay. The world’s queer artists united together – but not queer glass artists.

Tim Tate; "A Century Of Longing"; Blown & Cast Glass / electronics, original video; 16" x 7" x 7"; 2005. photo by Pete Duvall.  The top finial is of a cast glass hand holding a Victorian bouquet. Inside there is a film projector and a stack of film. The video is an 1896 sound test by Edison. In it, two men dance for the first time in film history. A century has passed, and not only has the definitions of “New Media” changed (it begins with Edison’s films), but the way we perceive the 2 men dancing has changed as well. Edison was testing whether or not he could sync sound and motion at the time. These men have been dead for 50 years....but they dance on, oblivious that this 3 minutes would be remembered as iconic to a population they couldn’t have imagined. It was probably thought of as amusing back then, or convenient......but the way we perceive these 2 men has evolved so much over time that now it seems touching and sweet to think of them dancing for eternity together.

Tim Tate; “A Century Of Longing”; Blown & Cast Glass / electronics, original video; 16″ x 7″ x 7″; 2005. photo by Pete Duvall. The top finial is of a cast glass hand holding a Victorian bouquet. Inside there is a film projector and a stack of film. The video is an 1896 sound test by Edison. In it, two men dance for the first time in film history. A century has passed, and not only has the definitions of “New Media” changed (it begins with Edison’s films), but the way we perceive the 2 men dancing has changed as well. Edison was testing whether or not he could sync sound and motion at the time. These men have been dead for 50 years….but they dance on, oblivious that this 3 minutes would be remembered as iconic to a population they couldn’t have imagined. It was probably thought of as amusing back then, or convenient……but the way we perceive these 2 men has evolved so much over time that now it seems touching and sweet to think of them dancing for eternity together.

There was also a few gay glass collectors that existed. Unlike the fine art world, they rarely supported struggling queer glass artists (they still rarely do). Perhaps it was the old internalized homophobia rearing its ugly head again. One glass art gallery that I showed my work in said that I could make glass with a gay narrative, but they would not exhibit those works in the gallery. They said they had no clients for it. The economics were on the side of hetero-normity.
I was lucky in that I discovered that some many non-gay collectors would acquire my work, even queer work. The artwork just needed to be very good work as well. The glass and art collectors of the time were, for the most part, enlightened liberals. Museum curators were much more open to showing queer artwork. In the earliest days it was never about the economics anyway. It still isn’t. It’s about refusing to stay invisible. SILENCE = DEATH was the mantra for queer artists.

I assume that there were regional pockets of queer glass artists that I was just not aware of. I hope I was just not seeing a collective queer effort in glass. I saw work by queer glass artists, but nothing was in any way obvious. My point with my artwork was to escape the invisibility of being a gay glass artist at that time. Invisibility had to be left behind. I was eventually lucky enough to be asked to speak at Yale University by Glenn Adamson on the topic of Art and Conflict in a panel sponsored by the Chipstone Foundation.

Tim Tate; "In The Dark Hours"; 16" x 7" x 7"; Blown and Cast Glass, Electronics, Video; 2006. Said Tim of this work: "In the early days of AIDS, there was a great deal of shame associated with contracting the disease. It felt like all control had been taken from your life, so many people took back the that control by committing suicide before the onset of symptoms. Suicide was the first thought I had when I discovered I was positive." Photo by Pete Duvall.

Tim Tate; “In The Dark Hours”; 16″ x 7″ x 7″; Blown and Cast Glass, Electronics, Video; 2006. Said Tim of this work: “In the early days of AIDS, there was a great deal of shame associated with contracting the disease. It felt like all control had been taken from your life, so many people took back the that control by committing suicide before the onset of symptoms. Suicide was the first thought I had when I discovered I was positive.” Photo by Pete Duvall.

So much has changed for gay people: HIV can now be controlled, we can now marry, and we have achieved some human rights. We have 10 openly gay men and women serving in Congress. We have a gay man running for president. Attitudes in the American public have improved drastically towards gay marriage. My fear is that we are becoming complacent with the gains that we have made. Anti-gay violence is on an alarming increase. The civil rights we have achieved are being eroded by the far right. This seems like the perfect time to focus again on queer art and defending what we have struggled for. I just thought I would gather that history here. Younger people than I will take it from here.

The [attached] images represent just a small portion of the works that I created during these last 30 years on this topic. 

Said Tim Tate of this image of New Orlean's AIDS Memorial - "The cornerstone of my Queer Glass Series is of course The New Orleans AIDS Monument.  I designed it in 1996 and my friend Mitchell Gaudet cast the glass when it finally got installed. This was one of the very first AIDS memorial sculptures in this country. It represents one of my proudest achievements as an artist. Thank you all who helped make it come to fruition. Its in Washington Park in the French Quarter."

Said Tim Tate of this image of New Orlean’s AIDS Memorial – “The cornerstone of my Queer Glass Series is of course The New Orleans AIDS Memorial. I designed it in 1996 and my friend Mitchell Gaudet cast the glass when it finally got installed. This was one of the very first AIDS memorial sculptures in this country. It represents one of my proudest achievements as an artist. Thank you all who helped make it come to fruition. Its in Washington Park in the French Quarter.”

 

Tim Tate
June 3, 2019

Tim Tate at Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art

Tim Tate, "Bitcoin.. Wealth in the 21st Century"

Tim Tate, “Bitcoin.. Wealth in the 21st Century”

Organized by the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. Curated by Director and Chief Curator Jennifer McCabe. Sponsored by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Divergent Materiality: Contemporary Glass Art
May 25 – October 13, 2019

“Divergent Materiality: Contemporary Glass Art” is a contemporary take on one of the first exhibitions featured at SMoCA, “Studio Glass: From the Gerard L. Cafesjian Collection.” As the lead donor of the Museum, Cafesjian’s legacy is important and his love of glass is undeniable. This exhibition highlights contemporary glass artists-both masters and emerging-whose innovative approaches using glass have advanced the medium’s discourse within contemporary art. While this is not a survey, the artworks selected represent the vast techniques and ideas used to explore this transformative material from the mid-20th century to today.

The exhibition features works from the collections of Stuart and Judy Heller, Sherman and Linda Saperstein, Fred and Sharon Schomer, Dan and Gail Tenn, and the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. Artists include well-known figures, such as Howard Ben Tré, Dale Chihuly, Lino Tagliapietra, and Stanislav Libensky and Jaroslava Brychtová. It also includes emerging artists whose works engage a broader dialogue in contemporary art, such as Matt Eskuche, Joseph Ivacic, Charlotte Potter, Ethan Stern, and Tim Tate.

Tim Tate; detail of "Bitcoin"

Tim Tate; detail of “Bitcoin”

“Using glass as medium is no doubt evidence to an artist’s mastery of their technique,” Lauren R. O’Connell, curator said. “But when looking at contemporary glass one must also consider the contextual influences effecting the artist’s ideas and process. The artists in this exhibition use the materiality of glass to enhance their perspectives on the contemporary moment, whether through translatable narratives or abstract luminous bodies of glass.”

Organized by the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. Curated by Lauren R. O’Connell. Generous support provided by The Arizona Glass Alliance, Felice Appell, and Penelope and Richard Post. Exhibition design by Jay Atherton, Clay Studio.

Breaking Glass News!! Tim Tate to be Featured Artist at GLASSTRESS During Venice Biennale!

tim.tate.venice.biennale.glassstress.2019.glass.art.international
Returning for the 58th Biennale di Venezia, the sixth edition of GLASSTRESS brings together a new line-up of leading contemporary artists from Europe, the United States, Latin America, India, and China in an ambitious exhibition exploring the endless creative possibilities of glass.

GLASSTRESS is a project by Adriano Berengo dedicated to supporting his mission of marrying contemporary art and glass. Since its debut in 2009 as a collateral event of the Venice Biennale, GLASSTRESS has revived the traditional craft of Murano glassblowing by forging new alliances with internationally renowned artists and designers and has since become an unparalleled platform showcasing ground-breaking new works in glass.

To celebrate 10 years of GLASSTRESS and 30 years of , the exhibition goes back to its historical roots on the island of Murano. An old abandoned glass furnace is now an evocative exhibition space for striking new works and installations by returning artists Ai Weiwei, Tony Cragg and Thomas Schütte as well as first time participants Prune Nourry, José Parlá, Tim Tate and Xavier Veilhan, amongst others.

 

Tim Tate; "The Endless Cycle"; 36" x 36" x 4"; Glass, Aluminum, Poly-Vitro, electronics

Tim Tate; “The Endless Cycle”; 36″ x 36″ x 4″; Glass, Aluminum, Poly-Vitro, electronics

For this section, Brazilian artist Vik Muniz has invited all artists to explore ‘how glass redefines our perception of space’. In another section of the exhibition, curated by Belgian artist Koen Vanmechelen, highlights from the past ten years will also go on display, including Mutter (2016/17) by Erwin Wurm, Laura’s Hands (2011) by Jaume Plensa and A Different Self (2014) by Mat Collishaw. Referring to the making of glass works, Vanmechelen says: ‘the world of the unknown and unseen becomes visible and tangible through beautiful accidents in time.’

With little or no prior experience working with glass, these artists have embraced the challenge of creating extraordinary works in this very delicate medium in collaboration with Muranese artisans. The output of this unusual encounter defies the stereotypes associated with this ancient craft, ultimately pushing the boundaries of both contemporary art and glass. This year’s edition of GLASSTRESS will also provide visitors with the opportunity to watch Murano glass masters at work at the adjacent glassblowing studio and learn more about Fondazione Berengo’s preservation efforts of this centuries-old artistry of Venetian glass-making.

 

Tim Tate; "The Endless Cycle" detail

Tim Tate; “The Endless Cycle” detail

GLASSTRESS 2019 – PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

 New artists :

Saint Clair Cemin (Brazil), Pedro Friedeberg (Mexico), Carlos Garaicoa (Cuba), Artur Lescher (Brazil), Prune Nourry (France), José Parlá (USA), Pablo Reinoso (Argentina), Valeska Soares (Brazil), Tim Tate (USA), Janaina Tschäpe (Germany), Xavier Veilhan (France), Robert Wilson (USA).

Returning artists :

 Ai Weiwei (China), Monica Bonvicini (Italy), Tony Cragg (UK), Shirazeh Houshiary (Iran), Alicja Kwade (Poland), Karen LaMonte (USA), Paul McCarthy (USA), Vik Muniz (Brazil), Jaume Plensa (Spain), Laure Prouvost (France), Thomas Schütte (Germany), Sudarshan Shetty (India), Koen Vanmechelen (Belgium), Erwin Wurm (Austria).

GLASSTRESS Anniversary highlights :

Jean Arp (Germany), Ayman Baalbaki (Lebanon), Miroslaw Balka (Poland), Fiona Banner (UK), Mat Collishaw (UK), César (France), Jake and Dinos Chapman (UK), Tracey Emin (UK), Jan Fabre (Belgium), Kendell Geers (South Africa), Francesco Gennari (Italy), Abdulnasser Gharem (Saudi Arabia), Michael Joo (USA), Ilya & Emilia Kabakov (Russia/USA), Michael Kienzer (Austria), Hye Rim Lee (South Korea), Oksana Mas (Ukraine), Hans Op de Beek (Belgium), Tony Ousler (USA), Javier Pérez (Spain), Antonio Riello (Italy), Bernardì Roig (Spain), Joyce Jane Scott (USA), Wael Shawky (Egypt), Lino Tagliapietra (Italy), Fred Wilson (USA), Dustin Yellin (USA).

glasstress ABOUT GLASSTRESS:

GLASSTRESS was launched in 2009 by Adriano Berengo as an official collateral event of the Biennale di Venezia. Today it is the world’s leading showcase for the collaborative work of contemporary artists and designers with Berengo Studio’s Muranese glass masters. GLASSTRESS runs from May 9 to November 24, 2019

Organized by Fondazione Berengo, GLASSTRESS exhibitions have been presented in prominent museums and institutions worldwide including the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Florida, the London College of Fashion and The Wallace Collection in London, the Art Museum Riga Bourse in Riga, Millesgården Museum in Stockholm, the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) in New York, the Beirut Exhibition Center (BEC) in Beirut, and the Ptuj City Gallery in Ptuj, Slovenia.

 Click HERE to jump to website.

SOFA Chicago Preview : Works By Washington Glass School Artists

SOFA 2018: Discovering New Concepts of Innovation and Design
Chicago, Illinois (November 1 – November 4, 2018) – This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Sculpture Objects Functional Art and Design (SOFA) Fair in Chicago, which takes place at the landmark Navy Pier.

Laura Beth Konopinski, "Beneath your walls the rubble exposed", mixed media glass, Alida Anderson Art Project, booth #A39. photo by Pete Duvall.

Laura Beth Konopinski, “Beneath your walls the rubble exposed”, mixed media glass, Alida Anderson Art Projects, booth #A39. (photo by Pete Duvall)

Washington Glass School artists Laura Beth Konopinski, Tim Tate and Michael Janis will have their new works featured at the critically acclaimed expo. The Chicago-based art expo is traditionally dedicated to three-dimensional art and design.

Tim Tate, Mrs. Dalloway : Morning and Mrs Dalloway : Evening, 32"dia each.

Tim Tate, Mrs. Dalloway : Morning (L) & Mrs Dalloway : Evening (R), 32″dia each. Habatat Galleries booth #A25

Michigan’s Habatat Galleries will feature new works by Tim Tate and Michael Janis, in their space #A25. Tim’s new infinity mirrors have become much more sculptural and dynamic – they must be seen in person to experience the reflected themes of empowerment and hope.

Tim Tate, "I Stand With My Sisters", mixed media, LED, glass. Habatat Galleries booth #A25. photo by Pete Duvall

Tim Tate, “I Stand With My Sisters”, mixed media, LED, glass. Habatat Galleries booth #A25. (photo by Pete Duvall)

Michael Janis has been creating a new series that will debut at the Chicago SOFA art fair, where his realistic imagery is offset with color and abstracted forms. His work can be seen also at Habatat Galleries space, #A25. Michael’s work will also be in a special exhibit at the fair: Intersection: Art & Life that features works by artists featured in a new book by Kevin Wallace, director of California’s Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts. His book explores the historical parallels between art and life, with the arts playing a central role in exploring identity, spirituality, our relationship with the environment and developing technologies.

Michael Janis, "In My Dreams", fused glass, 12" x 16", Habatat Galleries booth #A25. photo by Pete Duvall

Michael Janis, “In My Dreams”, fused glass, 12″ x 16″, Habatat Galleries booth #A25. (photo by Pete Duvall)

Michael Janis, "Forever", "Talk to Me", "Forever", 12" x 16" each. Habatat Galleries booth #A25. (photo by Pete Duvall).

Michael Janis, “Forever”, “Talk to Me”, “Forever”, 12″ x 16″ each. Habatat Galleries booth #A25. (photos by Pete Duvall).

Laura Beth Konopinski will be showing her new narrative mixed media sculptures. After a successful exhibit at the Art Miami Fairs last year, she has been creating new works that have already received critical acclaim. Laura Beth can be found at Alida Anderson Art Projects space, #A39 

SOFA Opens to eager crowds

Each year, SOFA Chicago opens to eager crowds!

Location: SOFA CHICAGO
Address: Navy Pier, Festival Hall
600 E. Grand, Entrance 2
Chicago, IL 60611

sofa.2018

Tim Tate: Finalist for DC Mayor’s Arts Award

Finally our Tim Tate is being recognized for the genius he is! He was just named finalist for “Excellence in Visual Arts” by the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities. The Mayor’s Arts Awards are the most prestigious honors conferred by the city on individual artists, teachers, nonprofit organizations and patrons of the arts. Artists and Organizations are recognized in six categories: Excellence in Visual Arts, Excellence in Performing Arts, Excellence in Creative Industries, Excellence in Arts Education, Excellence in the Humanities and the Larry Neal Writers’ Awards. The Award Ceremony will take place Tuesday, Sept 25th @ 7pm 2018.dc.mayor.art.award.tim_tate.washington.glass.school

washington.dc.mayors.arts.award.2018.tim_tate.glass.famous
This event is free and open to the public!
TUESDAY | SEPTEMBER 25, 2018 | 7 pm
THE LINCOLN THEATRE
1215 U Street NW, Washington DC
White Carpet Pre-Show 5:30 pm 

Tim Tate 2018 Penland Auction Featured Artist

Tim Tate, 8 Bats, 4 Seasons, wood, mirrors, cast objects, LEDs, 36" x 36" x 6"

Tim Tate, 8 Bats, 4 Seasons, wood, mirrors, cast objects, LEDs, 36″ x 36″ x 6″. Photo: Pete Duvall.

Glass artist and mixed-media sculptor Tim Tate has been part of the Penland School of Crafts community for decades, and for 2018, the education center will showcase his work at this year’s auction gala. The Penland School of Crafts Annual Benefit Auction is the premiere craft auction in the southeast, providing funds to support the operations of Penland School of Crafts while introducing new artists to collectors and expanding public understanding and awareness of craft.

Tim’s featured piece 8 Bats, 4 Seasons is a remarkable assemblage of materials, history, and imagination.

Detail of bats

Detail of bats

8 Bats, 4 Seasons may remind viewers of a classic wood-framed mirror, but Tim has added a rich composition of imagery to the mirror’s face and then transformed it further into a dimensional portal that stretches toward infinity. “The beauty of endless mirrors is in creating a space that exists nowhere else on Earth,” Tim explains in a recent interview for American Craft. The work feels familiar and inviting and utterly mysterious all at once.

But the story goes deeper than beauty. Tim has imagined his mirror as an artifact, “an undiscovered object from the 1860s commissioned by Cornelius Vanderbilt during the Golden Era. He had just returned from his grand tour of Asia…” While the four seasons are a nod to Currier and Ives, Keats and Thoreau, and Western decorative traditions, the piece’s eight bats are a nod to China, where bats have long served as a symbol of good luck.

The wife of Cornelius Vanderbilt, after returning from their grand tour in Asia. It is clear that by this time she had become obsessed

The wife of Cornelius Vanderbilt, after returning from their grand tour in Asia. It is clear that by this time she had become obsessed with bats.

 

American Craft’s interview with Tim describes him as “as much explorer as artist, seeking out the uncharted.” With 8 Bats, 4 Seasons, Tim beckons us into a parallel world of his creation full of questions and possibility. All are invited to look into Tim’s mirror—and the space beyond it—at this summer’s Penland Benefit Auction.

Penland’s 33rd Annual Benefit Auction is August 10-11, 2018, which means the spectacular weekend is only four months away! Register now to join this gala event and the great craft, great friends, and great memories it celebrates.

2018 Annual Benefit Auction

Friday, August 10 & Saturday, August 11

About Penland’s Annual Auction
Entering its 33rd year in 2018, the auction attracts over 800 collectors and volunteers to the Penland campus in the mountains of North Carolina each August. The weekend brings artists and patrons together and provides collectors with opportunities to meet established and emerging artists, learn about trends in contemporary craft, and see and purchase exceptional new work. If you are passionate about art and interested in investing in the health and the future of the arts, join us for this gala event.

Artists Against Gun Violence Timed for March For Our Lives DC Rally

Detail from "Endless Cycle" by artist Tim Tate. Photo by Pete Duvall.

Detail from “Endless Cycle” by artist Tim Tate. 36″ x 36″ x 4″ Glass, electronics, poly-vitro, aluminum. Photo by Pete Duvall.

Artists Against Gun Violence : a pop-up art exhibit 

Where: The 3rd Floor 4200 9th Street NW Above Slims (rear entrance)
March 22 thru April 9, 2018 Opening Reception: March 22, 6 to 9 pm,
Hours: March 24 (after March for Our Lives) 3-6pm, March 28 6-8pm, March 31, 3-6 pm, April 4, 6-8pm , April 7, 2-4pm,
April 9, 6-8pm

Artists Against GunViolence was created in solidarity with the students from Parkland, Florida who quickly responded to the tragic events at their school with a call to action. Over 40 artists from the DC area show their opposition to gun violence in a gallery show at The Third Floor and additional spaces in the Petworth neighborhood. The show opens March 22nd in time for the student-led March for Our Lives rally taking place in downtown Washington, DC on Saturday, March 24th.

Shattered Remnants by artist Michael Janis

“Shattered Remnants” by artist Michael Janis. 16″ x 19″; kilnformed glass, glass powder imagery. Photo by Pete Duvall.

Participating Artists: Tim Tate, Michael Janis, Frederick Nunley, Jackie Hoysted, Helen Frederick, Ellyn Weiss, David Mordini, Ellen Hill, Ruth Trevarrow, Gregory Ferrand, Pat Goslee, Robin Bell, Vicki Walchak, Jenny Walton, Carolina Mayorga, Glenn Richardson, Angela White, Maryanne Pollack, Sondra Arkin, Laura Elkins, Judy Jashinsky, Cory Oberndorfer, Laura Elkins, Cheryl Edwards, Liz Lescaut, Heather Levy, Mei Mei Chang, Sheila Crider, Anne Marchand, Margaret Dowell, Susan Lila Cole, Claudia Vess, Eric Margry, Kyuljin Lee, Eve Hennessa, Mary Welsh Higgins, Janis Goodman, Linda Hesh, Jenifer Berringer,T Yuan Chi Nicholson, Ann Stoddard, Henry Sundquest, Jasom Horowitz, Alonzo Davis, Jeff Zimmer.

Event info on Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/182598122365562/

WGS On Camera

Washington Glass School was approached by a new residential development in the area – Studio 3807 – to talk about how Washington Glass School connects with community. Directors Tim Tate and Michael Janis talked with the film crew about the public art created by the Studio:

Washington Post Reviews Zenith Gallery Exhibit “Light Up Your heART”

Erwin Timmers, "Water Falling, Glass, steel, LEDs, 36 × 12 × 4 in.

Erwin Timmers, “Water Falling”, Cast recycled glass, steel, LEDs, 36 × 12 × 4 in.

The Washington Post newspaper critic Mark Jenkins gives a great review to Zenith Gallery exhibit “Light Up Your heART” exhibit on now at Zenith Salon thru March 24th. Works by WGS Co-Founders Tim Tate and Erwin Timmers are in the group show. Critic Mark Jenkins gives a shout out to Erwin’s cast recycled glass panels as he describes the show in the Galleries Section of the Post.

 ”Light Up Your heART ” Through March 24 at Zenith Salon, 1429 Iris St. NW. 202-783-2963. zenithgallery.com.