The Many Facets of Erwin Timmers

Like a finely cut diamond, there are many sides to our Mr. Timmers.

Come hear eco-glass artist Erwin Timmers discuss his work. Thoughtful and ingenious, Erwin’ sculpture calls attention to contemporary issues through a creative re-engineering of often-overlooked forms and concepts, often focusing on industrial salvage and recycling.

In the opinion of many, he’s also one of the “earliest” green artists on the planet.

Erwin Timmers’ cast recycled window glass sculpture at Brentwood Arts

Artist Talk:  Saturday, June 22, 2:00pm 
Brentwood Arts Exchangeexchanging ideas through art

located in the Gateway Arts Center
3901 Rhode Island Avenue
Brentwood, MD 20722
301-277-2863/ tty. 301-446-6802
email: pgp-brentwood-arts@pgparks.com

Erwin Timmers at Brentwood Arts Exchange "Front Window Gallery"

Erwin Timmers cast recycled glass artwork on view May 11 – June 29, 2013.

The Brentwood Arts Exchange presents its Front Window Featured Artist: eco-artist Erwin Timmers. 

 

Glass sculptor and Washington Glass School co-founder, Erwin Timmers’ colorful eco-friendly glass sculpture will be on display in the Brentwood Arts Exchange gallery’s Front Window Gallery from May 11 – June 29, 2013. Thoughtful and ingenious, Erwin’s sculpture calls attention to contemporary issues through a creative re-engineering of often-overlooked forms and concepts, often focusing on industrial salvage and recycling. Erwin is featured in various prominent collections and has received numerous commissions. His eco-artwork has been on display in Zenith Gallery, Fraser Gallery, and Bender Gallery in Asheville, NC.


Reception: Sat., May 11, 2013, 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Gallery Artist Talk: June 22, at 2:00pm


Brentwood Arts Exchange Gallery Hours:

Monday – Friday: 10am-7pm

Saturday: 10am-4pm


Brentwood Arts Exchange in Gateway Arts Center is located at 3901 Rhode Island Avenue Brentwood, MD.


Contact the gallery at 301-277-2863 or tty. 301-446-6802, via email at pgp-brentwood-arts@pgparks.com or visit them online at arts.pgparks.com.

Erwin Timmers : Alchemical Vessel

The Smith Center for Healing and the Arts will have a special exhibit and fund raising benefit. Titled Alchemical Vessels‘, this initiative will feature the work of 125 artists, selected by 16 invited curators, to engage in a community dialogue on healing and transformation through the arts. Each artist has transformed a provided ceramic bowl using their own personal aesthetic and medium, drawing inspiration from the bowl as a place of holding, open community, a circle of care, sacred space, nourishment, and even the alchemical vessel. 

Erwin Timmers “Message In A Bottle” kilnformed recycled glass, ceramic

Washington Glass School’s Co-Director has created a work using his signature cast recycled glass. In honor of Earth Day, we are posting about his work in the upcoming show.

Said Erwin of his artwork for the show at the Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery: “The alchemical vessel speaks about creating purity, harmony and the healing that flows from it.  My work focuses on the disharmony we see in nature and our environment, which has a pronounced impact on our own wellbeing. This [vessel] references how we, as a society, consume and discard resources without much consideration.  I use the water bottle, a vessel in its own right, as a symbol of a useful everyday object that people use and discard thoughtlessly and which has now been severely overused.  Last year we consumed 28 billion plastic bottles, and only roughly 15% of them got recycled.”

“Using the medium of casting recycled glass and specific techniques to manipulate this medium” said Erwin of his glass sculpture, “my work invites the viewer to consider not only the end product, but also the origin of the piece and the process of re-creation. I hope my work showcases the possibility and beauty of recycled material, while encouraging the viewer to consider his or her environmental impact.”

Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery at Smith Farm Center, 1632 U St NW, DC

Alchemical Vessels Benefit: May 17, 2013, 7-9pm

About the Benefit
100% of the ticket sale proceeds will go to support Smith Center’s life-enhancing work and programs for people living with and recovering from cancer.

Benefit Ticket information:

Benefit tickets $125: 125 Benefit tickets will be sold, and each ticket holder at this level will be given the opportunity to select a piece of art. Priority will be given by the order in which the tickets were purchased—so the first to buy a ticket will be awarded first pick of the 125 works, and so on. All 125 works will remain in the show until after the closing of the exhibition on June 7, at which time the new owners can pick them up.

Supporter ticket: $50: This price level is good for entrance to the Benefit only. Ticket holders at this level do not get to keep a piece of art.

If you have trouble purchasing tickets, please call 202.483.8600 or email them at outreach@smithcenter.org.

Erwin Timmers Glass Artwork @ 30th Smithsonian Craft Show

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Among the 121 artists on display this weekend at the 30th annual Smithsonian Craft Show, Erwin Timmers’ glass artwork made from recycled glass sparkle like gemstones.

Erwin (also known as the “KING of Recycling”) uses glass diverted from the waste stream as his main source of raw material for his creations. Environmental integrity may be the inspiration of his work, but the result is pure beauty. Erwin has said that his work looks to bring out the unseen qualities that are often overlooked.

Make sure you stop in at the KING of Recycling’s space at the Smithsonian Craft Show held at the National Building in Washington, DC.

Smithsonian Craft Show
April 19 – 22, 2012
Erwin Timmers – Space 503
National Building Museum
(Judiciary Sq. Metro – Red Line)
401 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

Erwin Timmers: The Art of Recycling

>Erwin Timmers’ artwork and sculpture using recycled and components diverted from the waste stream had caught the eye of a photojournalist, and his work so intrigued her that she made a short documentary about Erwin’s work and philosophy. Below is a link to the video made by Uliana Bazar:

The Art of Recycling With Erwin Timmers from uliana bazar on Vimeo.

Uliana Bazar is currently working on a Masters in New Media Photojournalism at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC.

The Process – Erwin Timmers Cast Glass Bottles

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From This:


To This:

artist: Erwin Timmers; materials: cast recycled glass


As part of the ongoing series titled ” The Process” that documents the methodology of an artist or technique – the work of Erwin Timmers is the feature of today’s pictorial.

Eco-artist Erwin Timmers creates artwork with environmental themes, and he works with materials that are diverted from the waste stream. As he prepares for the upcoming Smithsonian Craft Show, he invited us to have a look at how he starts the casting process as he creates his beautiful glass sculptures.

Working within his concepts of sustainable design and art, Erwin sourced glass from the US Probate Courthouse, in Greenbelt, MD for his artwork that was slated to end up in the trash dump.

Using plastic bottles cleared from the Anacostia River watershed (of which there was plenty to choose from), Erwin coats the bottles with a plaster/silica coating.

Using plastic bottles cleared from the Anacostia River watershed (of which there was plenty to choose from), Erwin coats the bottles with a plaster/silica coating.

Erwin then fires the molds upside down in the kiln, melting out the plastic bottles.


Erwin extracts the remains of the plastic bottles from the molds.

Erwin then takes the cleaned molds and sets them in a bed of sand inside the glass kiln.

Erwin prepares flower pots act as reservoirs to hold the recycled tempered glass during the firing process.


Erwin loads the cleaned glass into the reservoirs and sets the kiln.

After the firing, the glass is divested from the plaster and polished.

Look for Erwin’s artwork at the Smithsonian Craft Fair – April 19-22, 2012.

Jack Johnson & Glass

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Jack Johnson’s got the whole (glass) world, in his hands.


This past summer we had a blog posting about National Geographic‘s newly created “Arts Ambassador for the Environment Award” – given to entertainers that are leaders in environmental and cultural conservation. The award was designed and made by the Washington Glass Studio from recycled glass. The winner for the inaugural award was singer Jack Johnson. We just received a photo of Jack holding his award.

The creation of the National Geographic Society award was covered in the first of the series called “The Process“. Click HERE to jump to the posting of how the recycled glass award was made using the “lost wax” process.