GlassWeekend 2011 Biennial Features WGS Artists

>GlassWeekend is a major contemporary glass event that runs from June 10 to 12 at WheatonArts in Millville, New Jersey. The three-day biennial weekend, first organized in 1985, brings together an international community of leading collectors, museum curators, gallery dealers, and artists for lectures, demonstrations and exhibitions. The event is organized by The Creative Glass Center of America at WheatonArts (CGCA) and the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass (AACG). Over the course of three days, Millville, New Jersey, will be ground-zero for glass art auctions, workshops, and lectures.

Glass art legend Dan Dailey will speak Saturday. Other highlights of Saturday’s lectures include a round-table of museum curators discussing their approach to exhibition planning moderated by Newark Museum decorative arts curator Ulysses Dietz and including Elizabeth Agro, Philadelphia Museum of Art associate curator of American modern and contemporary crafts and decorative arts; Renwick curator Nicholas Bell; and the fast-rising Ron Labaco, recently appointed curator of decorative arts and design at the Museum of Arts and Design.

Washington Glass School will be represented at the Biennial by Tim Tate, Allegra Marquart and Michael Janis – Michael will also be named “Rising Star”
by The Creative Glass Center of America at WheatonArts and the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass.

Millville, New Jersey has long been associated with glass. In 1739 when Casper Wistar founded America’s first successful glass factory near Alloway Creek, glassmaking and South Jersey became inextricably fused. From humble entrepreneurial beginnings, glass manufacturing ultimately became the region’s major innovative industry by the late 19th century.

In 1904, the celebrated poet, Carl Sandburg, proclaimed:

“Down in southern New Jersey, they make glass. By day and by night, the fires burn on in Millville . . . Big, black flames shooting out smoke and sparks; bottles, bottles, bottles, of every tint and hue . . . that marks the death of sand and the birth of glass.”

Although the production of window and bottle glass may have left Cumberland, Salem and Gloucester counties, the studio glass movement has been flourishing. WheatonArts and the Creative Glass Center of America (CGCA) in Millville have nurtured a growing number of talented individuals to use glass as their primary medium by offering its facilities to artists from around the world.

Click HERE to jump to GlassWeekend’s program.

GlassWeekend 2011

June 10th – 12th, 2011

WheatonArts

1501 Glasstown Road
Millville, New Jersey 08332
Tel: 800 998 4552
Website: http://www.glassweekend.com/

for some photos of GlassWeekend 2009 – click HERE.

Glass Sparks: Michael Janis

photograph by Tom Wolff

Michael Janis studied architecture at Mies van der Rohe’s IIT in his hometown of Chicago, IL. In 1993 he moved to Australia and there he worked on a number of large scale architecture projects, including work for the 2000 Sydney Olympics. It was in Australia that Michael first started working with glass, designing walls of cast glass.

Moving back to the United States in 2003, glass artwork became his focus. Michael began glass blowing at a Baltimore hot shop and was soon taking glass courses at art centers such as Haystack Mountain in Maine, North Carolina’s Penland School of Craft, and Urban Glass in New York.

Michael at Penland School of Craft

Attracted to the experimental and adventurous approach to the medium that defined the Washington Glass School, he soon became involved with the school as the Studio Coordinator.

L-R Washington Glass Studio directors Erwin Timmers, Tim Tate, Michael Janis. From the 2006 American Style article “Filling Glass With Meaning“. Photo by Roger Foley.

In 2005, Michael became one of the Co-Directors of the Washington Glass School, and he is the Director of Public Art projects for the Washington Glass Studio.

“The Gravity Between Us” Hotel Palomar, Washington, DC

Public Art sculpture for Prince George’s County Circuit Court

Michael continues teaching at the Washington Glass School, and also has taught glass art workshops at Istanbul’s Glass Furnace, the Penland School of Craft and the Bay Area Glass Institute (BAGI) in California.

Michael teaching fused glass technique class at Washington Glass School, 2005

Michael Janis teaching at California’s Bay Area Glass Institute, 2010

His kilncast bas-relief glass and steel sculptures were featured in the seminal “Compelled By Content” exhibition at Bethesda, Maryland’s Fraser Gallery. In this show, artists that used glass with narrative content showed how the traditional craft of glass was evolving.

“Liar Paradox” Collection of Susan and Fred Sanders. Photo: Anything Photographic

Michael began incorporating imagery into his glass works, and by manipulating crushed glass powder he has been able to create intricate detail images within the glass, layering the images to emphasize the depth within.

Text and imagery work their way through Michael’s artwork panels, similar to an architect’s diagrams, suggesting elements of stories not fully disclosed. Michael’s work references the Surrealist artists of the early twentieth century and Neo-Dada concepts as seen in the work of artists like Robert Rauschenberg, Joseph Cornell and Jasper Johns.

Click HERE to jump to a short documentary on Michael and his sgraffito frit powder technique.

From the catalog of the 2011 exhibit “Material World”:

“When viewers see images of Michael Janis’ work, they may not immediately recognize it as glass art…The virtuosity of Janis’ technique supports his imagery, which is often tinged with a nostalgia for days where innocence reigned and magic seemed possible. Janis is not simply naïve, for there is a darker undercurrent to these works that speaks to the loss of this sense of wonder.” Stephen Boocks curator, April 2011

Maurine Littleton Gallery space, SOFA Chicago 2009

In 2007, Maurine Littleton Gallery began exhibiting his glass artwork at international art shows such as Art Miami, SOFA Chicago and SOFA New York. Currently, his work is on exhibit at the Flemish Center for Contemporary Glass Art in Lommel, Belgium.

In 2009 he was awarded Florida’s “Emerging Artist” award by the Florida Glass Art Alliance, in 2010, he received the Saxe Fellowship from California’s Bay Area Glass Institute. This year, Janis will be named a “Rising Star” by the Creative Glass Center of America and the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass at the biannual glass art conference held at the Museum of American Glass at WheatonArts, in New Jersey.

The Memory of Orchids, 2011

His first museum solo show will open this year (August 6 thru November 6, 2011) at the Fuller Museum of Craft, in Brockton, Massachusetts. Michael Janis also was just awarded a Fulbright Scholarship, and will be at the UK’s University of Sunderland and National Glass Center in 2012.

Detail from “In the Evening Twilight”

Michael will be one of the featured artists in Long View Gallery’s exhibition of Artists of the Washington Glass School:

Washington Glass School: The First 10 Years
LongView Gallery
1234 9th Street, NW, Washington, DC May 19 – June 19,2011
Artist Reception, May 19th, 6:30-8:30 PM

For other Washington Glass School artist profiles:

Diane Cabe

Sean Hennessey

Allegra Marquart

Teddie Hathaway

Elizabeth Mears

Jackie Greeves

Erwin Timmers

Jeff Zimmer

Robert Kincheloe

If Its Tuesday, It Must Be Belgium

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Michael Janis’ glass artwork is on exhibit at Belgium’s Glazen Huis as part of an international show titled “The Glass Canvas”, curated by J. Maes. The gallery exhibition is seen as a meeting between old and new in a glass context of religion, architecture, art and entertainment. The show contrasts historical glass artwork with contemporary glass work, from 14th and 16th century stained glass, 19th century glass photo negatives to work from current art glass leaders.
This exhibition is an investigation into the use of glass as a canvas. It is a series of confrontations of the glass canvas in its physical appearance (smooth-rough light-dark transparent screen-reflection miniature-monumental), but also in the psychological experience (accessible-unreachable reveal-blur protect-invite). Going from the canvas as a mediator between inside and outside, to the glass surface as an image former or transformer, as a classical canvas or carrier of a concept that appears as a rigid skin or as a flexible weaving. The glass canvas presents itself as a breakable membrane that gives access to the unreachable reality, which it reflects or deforms, fragments or defragments.The glass canvas is a virgin surface that is covered with paints and emulsions or damaged by chemical or mechanical attacks, but in its clear state can be used as a high gloss protector.”
Artists exhibited : J.Schaechter [US], A.Salvador [IT], W.Berckmans [BE], M.Dukers [IT], F.Jespers [BE], F.Federer [GB], L.Semecka [CZ], S.Peretti [DE/US],M.Janis [US], R.Hawes [CA], N.Sandberg [US], T.Lahaie [US], J.Röder [DE], D.Sandersley [GB], K.Vanderstukken [BE/CA], I.Rosschaert [BE], M.Martens [BE], G.Pierson [BE], J.Caen [BE], E.Leibovitz [BE], W.Delvoye [BE].
‘The Glass Canvas – Glass as a canvas, as carrier through history’
April 10 – September 25, 2011
Het Glazen Huis
Flemish Center for Contemporary Glass Art
Dorp 14b, B-3920 Lommel, Belgium
http://www.hetglazenhuis.be/

Click here to jump to Glass Quarterly’s comments on “The Glass Canvas”

"Material World" Exhibit Transcends Technique Vs Content

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Material World, an exhibition at artdc Gallery (March 12 to Sunday, April 3, 2011) focuses on artists who use non-traditional materials or tradition materials in non-standard ways to produce their work. “The commitment these artists have for their materials and craft lets their processes inform the content of the work, not overwhelm it,” notes curator Stephen Boocks. “While viewers will inevitably wonder how the works were made and will marvel at the technical prowess, the pieces selected ultimately transcend the materials used, allowing each finished object to stand on its own.”
Featuring works by Sherill Anne Gross, Michael Janis, J. T. Kirkland, Matthew Langley, Katherine Mann, and Marie Ringwald, Material World features exceptional work diverse in style and “serves as a testament to the rich pool of talented artists from or with close ties to the DC area,” adds Boocks. “These six artists at varying stages of their careers all have a clear vision of what they’re trying to achieve with their preferred media. ”

The core of this exhibition deals with artistic media - how it relates to the artist’s work and why the artist chose that medium to make their artwork. Does the material support the work or does it get in the way? Do all elements work in concert with each other to create a seamless whole? In art, as in most things, it all comes down to a delicate balance.

An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 12 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Two artists talks will be held: Michael Janis and Marie Ringwald on Saturday, March 19, and Matt Langley on Saturday, April 2.
Gallery hours are Saturdays from 12 to 4 p.m. and by appointment.

Material World
artdc Gallery at The Lustine Center
5710 Baltimore Avenue
Hyattsville, Maryland 20781


About artdc Gallery: Located in the burgeoning Arts District in Hyattsville, Maryland, just outside of DC, the artdc Gallery features painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media, and more by metro DC artists. For more info visit artdc.com.

Transitions @ Urban Glass

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Urban Glass in Brooklyn, NY

Founded in 1977 as the New York Experimental Glass Workshop, Brooklyn’s UrbanGlass was the first artist-access hot glass centers in the United States and is now the largest. In addition to the artist-access studio, UrbanGlass offers a program of classes, workshops and intensives at every skill level. In 2005, Washington Glass School’s Michael Janis studied narrative glass techniques, which he now teaches at WGS. Next year, Urban Glass and its Robert Lehman Gallery will begin a renovation that will transform the facility into a state-of-the-art, energy efficient studio.


Robert Lehman Gallery

To capture the pivotal moment in the institutional transition, the gallery held a juried competition, titled “Transitions” and sought experimental, innovative and/or visually compelling works on a large or small scale that highlight transition: the juncture of endings, beginnings, transformations, and changes.
Transitions
will be the final show to be held in the Robert Lehman Gallery until the renovation and expansion project is complete.
This group exhibition was juried by Jennifer Scanlan, associate curator, Museum of Arts & Design; Courtney J. Wendroff, visual arts director, Brooklyn Arts Council; Dave Altman, co-chair, Urbanites; and Alan Iwamura, visual artist.

Again and Again Michael Janis
21″ x 21″ kilncast glass, glass powder imagery, steel, 2010

TRANSITIONS: Artists of UrbanGlass
September 16, 2010 – December 22, 2010

Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 15, 2010
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Featuring work by:

Jane Bruce
Victoria Calabro
Joseph Cavalieri
Eunsuh Choi
Kanik Chung
Kelsey Harrington
Adam Holtzinger
Michael Janis
Solange Ledwith
Yuka Otani
Pamela Sabroso
Hiroshi Takizawa
Miguel Unson

UrbanGlass is located at 647 Fulton Street in the historic former Strand Theater in Brooklyn’s burgeoning BAM Cultural District.

Fused Imagery In Glass – The Process

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Michael Janis was setting up a firing the other day of his thick layered glass panels, and the Washington Glass School blog asked how he created his frit powder drawings.


Detailed sketches are created to plan the layout each glass layer. Michael sifts frit powder onto sheet glass and manipulates with an scapel blade tip, scratching the powder until he is happy with the imagery (his version of sgraffito – or ” little scratch” technique.) Each working is fired into the glass, and aligned with the successive panel.
This process can take a number of weeks and requires multiple kiln firings. Once Michael is satisfied with the color depth of the frit powder application, he begins his set-up inside a kiln for the final firing – or full fuse.


The panels are assembled into the kiln, sometimes with clear interlayers.


The top layer is placed in the kiln.

The kiln is then set for a long schedule to allow for proper annealing of 6 layers of bullseye glass.
After the glass cools, Michael then cleans and coldworks the slab, and prepares for mounting into one of his steel frames.
The piece shown here is titled “Somewhere I Have Never Traveled”, and will be shown by
Maurine Littleton Gallery during SOFA Chicago.

Michael Janis Awarded Saxe Fellowship

>This weekend was the annual auction at California’s Bay Area Glass Institute (BAGI – a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and educating glass artists, students and the community).
Lots of beautiful and provocative works of art were auctioned, raising over $110,000 to benefit the school.

The judges chose the best piece in the auction, and three other Jurors’ Choice Awards. The criteria for these awards were uniqueness and creativity within the world of glass as well as for the individual artist, technical mastery, and content beyond mere technical beauty or mastery.

Awards were given, and the top prize, the Saxe Award went to Michael Janis for his piece ‘Meridians’.

Michael Janis / Meridians
Glass, Fused glass powder imagery, steel 12.5″ x 12.5″
photo: anything photographic

The Saxe Fellowship Award, named after world-renowned collectors George and Dorothy Saxe, is chosen by a jury of Dorothy Saxe, Maurine Littleton, Director of the Maurine Littleton Gallery, and Micaela Von Zwoll, Director of the Micaela Gallery. The winner of the Saxe Fellowship will receive a cash prize and will be invited to participate in BAGI’s Visiting Artist series. Previous winners of the fellowship include Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman.

Congratulations to Michael and all the artists!

There are still several pieces available – the full catalog is online… please call Chris Moore at 408 993-2244 to inquire about them.

Blue Spiral Gallery

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Tim Tate artwork in forground, L-R ‘The Conflict of Archimedes’, ‘Contentment Can’t Escape Me’, ‘Red Devil Bowl’.

NEW X Threeopened this weekend at Asheville, NC’s beautiful Blue Spiral 1 Gallery in Asheville, NC to a great crowd. There was a lot of interest and excitement at Blue Spiral’s introduction of their newest artists represented, and (happily) a number of sales!

Tim Tate artwork L-R: ‘My Love Life Thus Far’, ‘She Was Often Gripped With The Desire To Be Elsewhere’. Michael Janis artwork L-R: tarot ‘The Sun’, ‘Death’, ‘The High Priestess’, ‘The Moon’.

Michael Janis artwork L-R: tarot ‘Wheel Of Fortune’, ‘The Hangman’, ‘The Tower’.


The show runs until March 21, 2010
Blue Spiral 1 Gallery 38 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801

Northern Virginia Art Beat

>Northern Virginia Art Beat

Kevin Mellema of FCNP reviews McLean Project for the Arts shows – including Allegra Marquart and Michael Janis’ glass artwork. Novie Trump’s ceramic works are also reviewed.
Kevin also reviews Michael Janis and Allegra Marquart at Maurine Littleton Gallery.

Click HERE for the link to the entire article.

excerpt from the FCNP:

To Tell the Tale: Works by Allegra Marquart, Michael Janis and Tom Baker, at the MPA (1234 Ingleside Ave., McLean). The exhibit runs through Nov. 7, and the gallery is open Tuesday – Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday 1 – 5 p.m. For more details, call 703-790-1953 or visit www.mpaart.org.

Allegra Marquart and Michael Janis both work in glass out of the Washington Glass School in Mt. Rainier, Md. Tom Baker is a print maker from New Jersey.

Baker’s prints seem to juxtapose destructive and utilitarian objects in playfully similar ways. A coil spring stands beside a falling bomb with corkscrew spiraling trajectory trailing behind it. Similarly, an underwater mine sits ready to destroy anything that touches it, while a ship’s propeller motors past unscathed.

Allegra Marquart produces multi-colored relief glass panels that depict children’s fables. Maraquart’s works resemble wood block prints, not surprisingly, because she came from printing to glass making and at times, still makes wood block prints.

Marquart’s panels spare none of the gory details in what are often fairly graphic childhood tales. The combination of crude, often heavy handed childhood tales, with the cool, highly polished glass surfaces, gives the works a natural sense of tension.

Michael Janis is showing his re-interpretations of tarot cards.

In addition to the images here at MPA, both Janis and Marquart have works on view through October at the Maurine Littleton Gallery in upper Georgetown (1667 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, D.C.). The Georgetown gallery is open Tuesday – Saturday, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. For more details, call 202-333-9307 or visit www.Littletongallery.com).

Marquart’s work seems of a uniform mien at both locations. Janis however has two new large panel works and nine smaller 12-by-12-inch panels at Littleton Gallery.

ars-beat
Michael Janis’s “Words Left Unsaid.”

While the tarot card pieces are interesting, they come off as a bit literal at times. The new smaller pieces at Littleton, however, are anything but. Those works have a mysterious dream state sense of surrealism that engages the viewer on a deeper more engrossing level. Using figures, text and common objects we are left to our own devices to figure out the story.

One fairly straightforward image titled, “Words Left Unsaid,” shows a man with a jumble of letters floating in his throat. It’s a notion most all of us can relate to. How would things be different if we released the words behind our mouths. Would the world be better or worse for it? Would our lives be fulfilled, or would our deepest fears be realized by their release? Would we even have the chance to say them at all if we wait too long?

We can’t answer any of those questions here. All we can do is stare at the man and wonder at his fate and the fate of those around him. We sense his need to speak, but can’t make out what it is from the disjointed jumble of letters on view. Perhaps even he doesn’t yet know exactly what to say just yet. All nine of the smaller panels are filled with entertaining and somewhat voyeuristic questions.

Duane Reed Gallery

>Duane Reed Gallery celebrated their 15th anniversary and relocation to the trendy Central West End in St Louis this May. The inaugural exhibition (May 15 – June 13) features fiber sculptor John McQueen and Washington Glass School artist Michael Janis.
L-R Merrill Straus, Duane Reed, Michael Janis, John McQueen, Glenn Scrivner, Gaby Schaefer Naus

Michael Janis talks about his work and techniques.