Washington Glass School Dances In the New Year!

Dance With Us The rhythm of the cosmos Is a waltz In three steps Dream Create Sustain

Dance With Us
The rhythm of the cosmos
Is a waltz
In three steps
Dream
Create
Sustain

The crew at Washington Glass School wish all a joyful, bright, healthy, prosperous and happiest new year ahead! May this new year bring all the crazy colors and fun in life!

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow.” — Albert Einstein 

Happy President’s Day!

President George Washington tries to make sense of the Metro.

President George Washington tries to make sense of the Metro. Still image from Mt Vernon’s web series of General Washington in modern DC.

Washington’s Birthday is observed the third Monday of February in honor George Washington, the first President of the United States. This date is commonly called Presidents’ Day and many groups honor the legacy of past presidents on this date.

Washington’s actual birthday, Feb. 22,  became a U.S. government holiday back in 1885. In the early 1950′s, there was a movement led by a coalition of travel organizations to create three-day weekends by moving the celebration of some holidays to Mondays. One of the suggestions was to create a Presidents’ Day between Washington’s birthday and Lincoln’s birthday, which was a holiday in some states. A few states tried the new arrangement, but it was not universally adopted across the country. Also in the early 1950′s there was a proposal to make March 4 — the original presidential inauguration day — a holiday to honor all presidents, but that went nowhere.

The National Holiday Act of 1971 passed by Congress created three-day weekends for federal employees by moving the celebration of some holidays to Mondays, although states did not have to honor them. 

General George Washington checks out the offerings at the food trucks parked near the White House.

General George Washington checks out the offerings at the food trucks parked near the White House.

Although the federal holiday is marked on the third Monday in February, there is no agreed-upon name, no universal agreement on who is being celebrated, and the use of the apostrophe in the name is varied: Sometimes it isn’t used at all (as in Presidents Day), sometimes it is placed between the last two letters (President’s Day) and sometimes it is after the last letter (Presidents’ Day).

So – wishing all a Happy Presidents’ Day, or President’s Day, or Presidents Day – or whatever.

William Warmus Lecture at the Museum of Glass

William Warmus speaking at Takoma’s Museum of Glass

Art Historian William Warmus had a fascinating lecture this past Saturday at the Takoma (Washington) Museum of Glass. His talk was titled “The True History of Glass?”.  In his talk, William touched on alternate histories of, and futures for, glass as an art form, concluding that we may sometimes need to forget the truth if we want to advance the art.  

Tim Tate and Glass Secessionism merits inclusion in the True History of Glass. The recording of the lecture is online – click HERE.

In his discussion, William talked about the condensed version of the American Studio Glass Movement, and some of the precursors to the accepted version of glass history. He also gave a shout out to Washington Glass School‘s Professor Tate, the “Glass Secessionism” discussions and the Washington Glass School in his museum talk.
To jump to the online recording of the lecture – click HERE.

International Glass & Clay 2013 Catalog online

The International Glass & Clay 2013 Catalog – what the well dressed glass library is sporting!

Kicking yourself for missing the International Glass & Clay show that just closed in Washington, DC? Don’t let us stop you!  
You can look at the catalog (or catalogue) online – click  HERE to jump to Google docs.

High Tea at the International Glass & Clay Exhibit

The James Renwick Alliance (JRA) held a “Tea with the Brits” wrap-up social at the International Glass and Clay 2013 exhibit held at Pepco Gallery. Artomatic and the DCCAH have held a collaborative exhibition of glass and ceramics featuring artists from the Sister Cities of Sunderland, England and Washington, DC., ending in high style with a final event held at the gallery. Photos by Miriam Rosenthal.

Tea, cucumber sandwiches, fresh made scones with home-made jams and clotted cream, and a spot of dry sherry were on the menu. 
Artomatic’s George Koch addresses the JRA audience.
Novie Trump talks about Laurel Lukaszewski’s ceramic sculpture.
Novie Trump and Michael Janis discuss UK glass artist Colin Rennie’s work.
High Tea presenters and organizers (L-R) Novie Trump, Bonnie Schwartz, Mallory Lawson, George Koch,  Michael Janis.

The closing night event of the International Glass & Clay event finished the exhibit with great fun and last minute sales. All agreed that we will miss the fantastic artwork that has been on display, and that with such good results, the connections with our UK artists and colleagues have been made stronger! When is the next collaborative show is the question we all ask!

International Glass & Clay – In the Quieter Moments

The opening reception for the International Glass and Clay 2013 was crazy and fun – meeting all the artists was great, but I didn’t focus on the works. My good friend, Patrick Oberman of Artomatic invited me to come back to the show on a quiet afternoon and really look.  This posting is intended to contemplate the media based artwork by the talented artists involved in the International show and see what the works say.

The artwork on exhibit invites investigation.

UK glass artist Roger Tye  – Roger has two works in the exhibit, and they each present very different aspects. His wall piece is lush with color and organic plant forms. The glass tendrils curve around and out of the dimensional piece – its a very pretty and appealing work.

Roger Tye’s blown glass wall sculpture.

His other sculpture “Fold” has a different feel – its much more narrative. All over the moors and fells of the North of England and southern Scotland, there are strange dry-stone structures – similar to what Roger has sculpted. The stone structures (aka ‘sheepfold‘) were designed to provide a shepherd with a place to hold a few sheep and protect from theft. Roger’s sculpture “Fold”, made of cast glass and slate, is a witty contemporary commentary on this concept, complete with security camera.

“Fold” by Roger Tye.

US ceramic artist Jeff Herrity has three of his slipcast ceramic “totems” in the show. Jeff’s mother was a ceramic artist, and these works harken back to his childhood memories that include kitschy bits and bobs and elements created from ceramic molds. He sees the stacked figures as representative of a group of people that are a clan. We are all may different, yet we rely upon each other – for if one goes missing, we all fall.

Jeff Herrity “Totem I”, “Totem II”, “Totem III”

UK glass artist James Maskrey has some exquisite narrative glass works in the show – amongst my favorites:

James Maskrey “The Worst Journey In The World”

His blown works all reference the 1910–1913 British Antarctic Expedition led by Robert Falcon Scott. The ill-fated journey was to recover eggs of the Emperor penguin for scientific study. It was thought at the time that the flightless penguin might shed light on an evolutionary link between reptiles and birds through its embryo.

James Maskrey, “Winter Journey”, “Last Entry”, “The Barrier”.

The series based on the story “Worst Journey in the Worldand asks, but does not answer, the question of whether their suffering was futile, or whether it would inspire future human beings facing very different challenges. 

Nancy Donnelly’s fused glass panels.

US glass artist Nancy Donnelly is exhibiting her beautiful fused glass panels “Thistle & Berries” and “The Night Garden”. Both are made from fused frit powders and enamels fired into panels of glass. Her works have a quiet and thoughtful reserve.

Inge Panneels, “Micro Macro”

UK glass artist Inge Paneels’ fused glass panels are created using waterjet to precisly cut intricate patterns based on aerial imagery of river estuary juxtaposed with blood vessel structure. The fused glass panel highlights the communalities

Joe Hicks “Bottle”

US clay artist Joe Hicks has some beautiful ceramic stoneware with shino glaze. His works anchor the entry space of the gallery.

Philippa Whiteside’s ceramics feature incredible detail. The waterjet cut ceramics tell a story that runs around the cube form in different fonts.
Philippa Whiteside “Hope”

UK ceramic artist Philippa Whiteside works at creating beauty with her detailed clay works. She clearly loves to experiment with surface decoration and texture, and has a fascination with text and words.

Syl Mathis’ boat shaped glass/mixed media forms showcase his master craftsman skills.

US glass artist Syl Mathis‘ artwork has me fall in love with both the glass and the method he displays the kilncast forms. He is very skilled in his metal and stonecarving techniques, and I love his sandcarving of the glass figures.

Syl Mathis, “Ancient Ice”, “Time Bound”.

The artworks by the artists create intriguing and beguiling relationships with the other works on display. Part of the fun of the show is the new juxtapositions of the different styles and approaches of the art. 

Allegra Marquart‘s kilnformed & sandcarved glass panels (L) and Erwin Timmers‘ cast recycled glass sculptures (R) have a great dialog in the gallery.

The International Glass and Clay 2013 exhibit is open through March 23, 2013, at Washington, DC’s Pepco Edison Place Gallery, located at 702 Eighth Street, NW, Washington, DC. The show is organized by Artomatic and the DCCAH.

Pepco Edison Place Gallery

The Art Residency Experience

A Roundtable Discussion

Whether you’ve been on an art residency, or hope to do so in the future, please join members of the Washington Glass School, Flux Studios and invited guests for a roundtable discussion about residencies in the US and abroad.

Learn first hand what other artists have experienced.

  • See what opportunities are available.
  • Discover what others have gained from residencies and how they might apply to you.
  • Share your insights with other artists.

This free discussion is being presented as part of the exhibition, International Glass & Clay 2013 at PEPCO’s Edison Gallery, March 1 – 23, 2013; an exchange between artists from Washington, DC and Sunderland, UK.
 

Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2013

5 – 6 pm Wine Tasting

6 – 7:30 pm Roundtable Discussion


Location:  Edison Place Gallery

702 Eighth Street (between G and H Street), Washington, DC 20068
To RSVP for the free event – click HERE.

Kids & Glass = FUN!

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Erwin Timmers teaches the fun part of fusing glass to the excited class.

Brentwood Arts Exchange (part of Maryland’s Prince George’s Parks and Recreation) has its summer Creative Expressions Camp where kids get to explore a variety of artistic media as well as contemporary reading and writing activities around such themes as animals, nature, and adventure. Camp instructors Randall Holloway and Michelle Dukes were able to corral a big group with a lot of assistance from one of Brentwood Art Exchange’s summer staff, Nefertiti Warren.

“May I Please Have Some More?” New WGS studio coordinator Audrey Wilson doles out frits and stringers.
The students unleash their artistic visions in glass.
Pappa Erwin demonstrates the proper glass cutting procedure.
“I’m making a fish – how ’bout you?” “I am showing how ennui is the echo within” “Really? – cool!”
The Next Generation of artists get their start.
Some of the works of art after firing – beautiful!
One was possibly inspired by pop (cap) culture!

The Washington Glass School works closely with our neighborhoods and schools – as an organization we are driven by a commitment to social and environmental purposes. WGS has based its vision using the “Social Entrepreneurial Business Model” where we seek to achieve sustainability through a broad engagement of our communities without seeking grants and where “doing good” is integral to “doing well”.

Jeremy proudly shows off his first glass artwork piece .
The camp ended with a gallery show of the students’ work.

Sunderland, England Visits Washington, DC

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clockwise from left: Novie Trump, Tim Tate, George Koch, Oliver “Skip” Dulle, Tom Hurst, Catherine Auld and Erwin Timmers talk about the prospects for an international exhibition of glass and clay. 

Based on the aftermath of Tim Tate & Michael Janis’ successful Fulbright Scholarship assignment to the University of Sunderland, representatives from DC’s sister city (which is Sunderland, England) popped in for proverbial “spot of tea and a bit of a chat” – re: the possibility of another international glass exhibition to be held in DC in Spring 2013. (One may remember the fabulous Glass 3 exhibit hosted by Artomatic in 2008.)  

George Koch, founder and board member of DC’s Cultural Development Corporation, chats with WGS’ Tim Tate 

This time the arts organization is proposing to expand the format to include ceramics and possibly another international partner; all together exhibiting at a downtown DC gallery space. Discussions included international workshops, marketplace events and how cultural tourism could be integrated. The representatives from the UK met at the Washington Glass School and at Flux Studios.

Artist Novie Trump explains the process of a commissioned ceramic installation to the Sunderland delegation.
Dr David Smith, Chief Executive, Sunderland City Council and DC Mayor Vincent Gray sign the Sunderland, UK / Washington, DC Sister City Agreement, February 22, 2012, 

We don’t want to jinx the procedures and process at this early stage, but we are excited at the prospect of such an event! 

DC Artists: DCCAH Announces 2013 Grant Programs

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The DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities offers several funding programs for individuals and nonprofit organizations located in the District of Columbia. Individuals are not required to provide matching funds. Organizations are only required to provide matching funds as indicated

Commission staff conducts general workshops where participants learn useful information about the Commission and the steps to take to submit a grant application. At these workshops, staff and applicants discuss each grant-making opportunity. Workshop dates, times and locations are subject to change.

For more info – click HERE to jump to the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities online Grants page.