WGS Featured Artist: Carmen Lozar

CLICK IT! Featured Artist: Carmen Lozar

Carmen Lozar‘s glass sculptures inspires and provoke imagination. Telling stories has always been her primary objective. Some narratives are sad, funny, or thoughtful but artworks are always about celebrating life. Carmen lives in Bloomington-Normal, Illinois where she maintains a studio and is a member of the art faculty at Illinois Wesleyan University. She has taught at Pilchuck Glass School, Penland School of Craft, Pittsburgh Glass School, Appalachian Center for Crafts, The Chrysler Museum, and the Glass Furnace in Istanbul, Turkey. She has had residencies at the Corning Museum of Glass and Penland School of Craft. Although she travels abroad to teach and share her love for glass – most recently to Turkey, Italy, and New Zealand – she always returns to her Midwestern roots. 

Washington Glass School blog catches up with Carmen as her work is part of the WGS Contemporary online exhibit “CLICK-IT!” 

Carmen Lozar

Carmen Lozar

Washington Glass School (WGS): Describe your artwork method/process.

Carmen Lozar: I work with rods and tubes of borosilicate glass at a torch.  Flameworking lends itself to small intimate pieces, the type I most enjoy making. The process requires concentration, years of skill building and many, many generous mentors who are willing to share their knowledge. 

Caremen Lozar, "Bubble Gum", 2019, Flameworked glass, found object, 3"x 2"x 6"

Caremen Lozar, “Bubble Gum”, 2019, Flameworked glass, found object, 3″x 2″x 6″

WGS: Describe your work in the show and highlight aspects that the viewers should understand about the work.

Carmen Lozar: The work is the show is meant to be intimate and accessible, highlighting human follies in a lighthearted way. The bubble gum pieces are about the sticky messes we continually put ourselves in but also the ridiculous and stretchy nature of glass as a material. To me, much of the work is both funny and sad. 

The ketchup and mustard piece, Fight, is about the continual small spats that my daughters engage in daily. I know that they love each other and work well together but this does not stop them from ongoing sibling rivalry. This piece makes light of their arguments knowing they will pass and, in a way, preserving my sanity.

Carmen Lozar, "Fight", Flameworked glass and found object. 3"H x 8"L x 2"D

Carmen Lozar, “Fight”, Flameworked glass and found object. 3″H x 8″L x 2″D

WGS: How have you handled the Covid lockdown?

Carmen Lozar: I have been oscillating between enjoying a quiet summer and completely freaking out. There is so much to process and digest that I am sure the landscape of what we make will change as a result. I believe an entirely new aesthetic will result as a product of the pandemic and unrest.

Image from Carmen Lozar's sketchbook.

Image from Carmen Lozar’s sketchbook.

WGS: Do you do a lot of planning in your work – or is there an element of chance while working?

Carmen Lozar:  I do a lot of planning before I begin a new artwork, usually beginning with several drawings in my sketchbook. I usually stick to the drawing/idea pretty closely although if there are too many repetitive parts in the piece I will simplify. I have a short attention span and making the same objects over and over, while I love the way it looks, is difficult for me.

WGS: if you were not an artist – what would you be?

Carmen Lozar: An allergist.

WGS: What is your rule of thumb in determining when a work is finished?

Carmen Lozar: You get a crazy wonderful rush of adrenaline that you cannot find anywhere else!

Click here to jump to Carmen Lozar’s work in CLICK-IT!
Click HERE to jump to the show.

WGS Featured Artist: Jason Chakravarty

CLICK IT! Featured Artist: Jason Chakravarty

Jason Chakravarty is a mixed media artist based in Arizona. He worked for four years in a commercial neon sign shop before earning his MFA from California State University-Fullerton. He teaches neon and kiln casting workshops at universities and glass centers nationwide, and exhibits his work nationally.

Jason Chakravarty, together with Jennifer Caldwell have made many collaborative pieces, maintaining a critical, conceptual, and technical dialogue thru their work. Jennifer best known for her flame worked glass compositions and Jason’s technical focus is cast glass objects which often include parts or techniques from the hot shop. He uses familiar photorealistic imagery that ranges from sea to space. The narrative is the starting point and is a response to daily life and cultural observations.

Their work has been exhibited in museums including Corning Museum of Glass and Tacoma Museum of Glass, at SOFA Chicago.

Jennifer Caldwell and Jason Chakravarty

Jennifer Caldwell and Jason Chakravarty

Washington Glass School blog catches up with Jason as his work is part of the WGS Contemporary online exhibit “CLICK-IT!” and the associated show “Artists for Racial Justice

Washington Glass School (WGS): Describe your artwork method/process.

Jason Chakravarty: Our process begins with a need to illuminate an idea. Ideas come from our surroundings, travels (or lack of in 2020), experiences, written stories, or even just captured moments. Glass presents the only medium with endless possibilities. We cast, blow, sculpt, paint, slump, fuse, carve, light it up and cut it. Glass can be made thick, thin, transparent, and opaque. To explain a single process would ignore the way we work. 

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell, "Bee-nounced"; cast murrini with flameworked components.

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell, “Bee-nounced”; cast murrini with flameworked components.

WGS: Describe your work in the show and highlight aspects that the viewers should understand about the work.

Jason Chakravarty: For Click It, we were lucky to include works that span over the past decade. The most recent being ‘Beenounced‘. This piece highlights the delicacy of Jennifer’s flame worked bee and honey living amongst a random and repeating hexagon honeycomb pattern. Each leg and wing is sculpted by hand, while a more machine-like process for the hexagon can be compared to a sushi roll. Long pulls of clear glass coated with yellow or black cut up, organized on end and cast to make a larger hexagon home.

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell, "Woken Inna Space Without Sound"; sculpted/blown glass/mixed media

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell, “Woken Inna Space Without Sound”; sculpted/blown glass/mixed media

On the other end of the timeline spectrum, ‘Woken Inna Space Without Sound‘ was entirely made using the hot shop. A small paperweight was created and cooled, butterfly and bee decals were applied to the surface. The paperweight was then heated, more clear glass was added and the glass cooled again. Add additional decals and repeat. Each layer requires a couple days. Once all the layers were built the glass was reheated again, shaped and sculpted into a half moon with craters. Layers of transparent and opaque gray, white and opal color were added to the surface and then cooled. The butterfly net was hand blown separately.

Discussing one last piece. “Catch and Release. The lock is cast glass and was purchased in Tel Aviv on a trip to teach in Jerusalem. At the time it felt like an ancient relic that we had found in an old mud hut and bought from a man that was nearing the end of a long and nonmonetary rich life. The fence referenced a fence that ran along the walkway to a bridge in Seattle that we would use when boarding/unboarding the ferry. The fence itself is created by hand using a torch and then assembled cold and held tight in a frame like a puzzle.

WGS: How have you handled the Covid lockdown?

Jason Chakravarty: It feels like we are working on the same path as a year ago. The demand for our work has shifted but not slowed down. While we are busy, the silver lining has been that all the anxiety has subsided. Deadlines are on ‘island time’ more like a suggestion vs an absolute. While too much to list has changed we are still consistently working. Every day is still a great day to add something better to the world.

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell; "Weeding Out"; cast/fused glass, steel.

Jason Chakravarty and Jennifer Caldwell; “Weeding Out”; cast/fused glass, steel.

WGS: What artwork/event has moved you and got you thinking about your own work?

Jason Chakravarty: Typically travel and life experience write the story for our work and fill our sketch books. It feels like we are now able to resolve some of the ideas that have been sitting or on hold. So I would say the ‘lack of event’ has us thinking more about how we work and the actual work and less focused on the excitement that comes with new ideas.

WGS: if you were not an artist – what would you be?

Jason Chakravarty: Fred Flintstone.

The artist formerly known as Jason Chakravarty.

The artist formerly known as Jason Chakravarty. Yabba.Dabba.Do.

WGS: Do you do a lot of planning in your work – or is there an element of chance while working?

Jason Chakravarty: We start with a plan and embrace all the changes along the way. Our work is very process orientated. Many steps using many techniques. Each would have to be perfect to reach our original plan. Nothing is ever perfect. Even our view of the narrative shifts with time, day, and week.

WGS: What is your rule of thumb in determining when a work is finished?

Jason Chakravarty: Each piece we make starts with a narrative. Our goal within a narrative is to raise questions vs provide answers. A piece is resolved when the question is asked.

Click HERE to jump to Jason Charavarty and Jennifer Caldwell’s work in CLICK-IT!

And see their work as part of “Artists For Racial Justice” – click HERE.

Read about Jennifer Caldwell – the other half of JC2   -click HERE.

New Fall Class Schedule – Part 2 – Lampworking Classes

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The Washington Glass School’s 2011 Fall Lampworking courses are now available online and enrollment is open. Have a look at the new fun classes!

Class 1108Open Studio For Flameworkers

Already know the basics of flameworking? Want to join others in a social atmosphere while you work? Our Flamework Club gives each student the opportunity to work independently in a world class studio while meeting some great new friends! Materials extra.

Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor : Robert Kincheloe

Dates : Sat / Sun afternoons (call to confirm appointment)

Time : 1:30pm to 5pm

Tuition : $300 for 4 sessions or included with Instructor Classes

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Class 1128Beginning Sculptural Flameworking

Learn the basics of making objects in the flame from borosilicate (Pyrex) glass. This 2-day class will focus on skills that are the basis of working with glass on the torch. You will come away with knowledge and some fine objects too! Rob is an energetic, knowledgeable instructor and artist who is ready and willing to help anyone learn this fascinating art form. The materials fee provides student with initial pack of glass, fuel for the torches and the loan of a full set of hand tools. Additional glass and supplies are available for purchase as the class progresses. Take this class more than once to reinforce your skills! Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor : Robert Kincheloe

Dates : Sat/Sun Sept 10 & 11

Time : 10am-1:30 pm (also includes a free open studio session till 5pm if you wish)

Tuition :$250 plus $50 material fee for instructor

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Class 1129Flameworking with Color

Learn the basics of working with colored borosilicate (Pyrex) glass. This 2-day class will focus on processes for including patterns and designs in glass at the torch. You will come away with the ability to design work with a variety of color application techniques. This is an excellent follow up class to the Introduction to flameworking. Come advance your ability to create through this fascinating art form. The materials fee provides student with initial pack of glass, fuel for the torches and the loan of a full set of hand tools. Additional glass and supplies are available for purchase as the class progresses. Take this class more than once to reinforce your skills! Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor : Robert Kincheloe

Dates : Sat/Sun Dec. 3 & 4

Time : 10am-1:30 pm (also includes a free open studio session till 5pm if you wish)

Tuition : $250 plus $50 material fee for instructor

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For the list of the NEW Fall 2011 Kiln Classes – click HERE

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PayPal Class Registration
Below:



Class registration




Glass Sparks: Robert Wyckliffe Kincheloe

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Glass artist Robert Wyckliffe Kincheloe is focused on blending a variety of techniques to create sculptural works in glass. Rob has studied all forms of glass including scientific flameworking, sculptural flameworking, fusing, kiln-casting, glass blowing, hot casting, cold-working, and the blending of techniques for sculptural assembly. His focus is flameworked and cold-worked borosilicate glass and he has been pioneering the use of kiln-casting borosilicate glass for use in flameworking.


Robert Kincheloe demo at Penland School of Crafts 2011

Robert has studied and taught glass techniques at many centers, including Virginia Tech Scientific Glass Lab, Penland School of Crafts, the Carslisle School of Glass, Pilchuck Glass School, and The Bullseye Research Lab. For several years, Rob has been part of the technical staff involved with the International Society of Glass Beadmakers annual Gathering. He was selected as a Glass Craft Emerging Artist for spring 2010 in The Flow Magazine. Robert was also been published in the spring 2011 edition of The Flow magazine for his techniques on incorporation of kiln-casting of Borosilicate components in Flameworked Sculptures. He has another tutorial on cold-working techniques coming out in the summer 2011 edition of The Flow Magazine.He has been the Studio Coordinator and a Resident Artist at the Washington Glass School for the last year.

Robert heads up the flameworking program at the Washington Glass School, where he is adding new levels of glass instruction and working at crossing over techniques to those already offered at WGS.

Robert Kincheloe Tree of Life, 2010



Robert Kincheloe Holding onto Possibilities, 2010

Holding onto Possibilities” was made for the The Flow Magazine’s Spring 2011 Tutorial: Flameworking with Kiln-cast Borosilicate Glass.



Robert Kincheloe Shine On Your Love Light, 2011
Kiln-cast glass, Steel, and LED lighting.


Robert actively teaches and promotes the progress of glass arts as a creative medium. This summer Rob will be teaching and presenting at the 2011
ISGB Gathering in Louisville, KY. He will be assisting Elizabeth Ryland Mears at the Pittsburgh Glass Center for her summer flameworking intensive. Robert will also be presenting cold-working techniques for flameworking at the Art Glass Invitational in Hilliards, PA.

Click HERE to jump to Robert Kincheloe’s website.


Robert will be one of the featured artists at Longview Gallery ‘s exhibition in honor of Washington Glass School’s 10 year anniversary: Washington Glass School: The First 10 Years

LongView Gallery

1234 9th Street, NW, Washington, DC
May 19 – June 19, Opening Reception, May 19th, 6:30-8:30 PM


For other glass artist profiles:

Diane Cabe

Sean Hennessey

Teddie Hathaway

Elizabeth Mears

Jeff Zimmer

Allegra Marquart

Jackie Greeves

New Flamework Class Schedule

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Now that Spring has sprung – its time to get busy! Below are the new Spring/Summer Torchworking class offerings –

Class 1108 – Flamework Club – Open Studio For Flameworkers
Already know the basics of flameworking? Want to join others in a social atmosphere while you work? Our Flamework Club gives each student the opportunity to work independently in a world class studio while meeting some great new friends! Materials extra. Class Limit: 6 students
Instructor : Robert Kincheloe
Dates : Sat/Sun afternoons (call to confirm appointment)
Time : 1:30pm to 5pm
Tuition : $300 for 4 sessions (or included with instructor classes)

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Class 1109 – Flameworkers Weekend Workshop

Develop your sculptural voice through working with glass at the bench torch. This 2-day workshop will focus on advancing your individual skills while allowing you to work on your own personal sculptural projects. In this free-form workshop the participants will be able to not only learn techniques necessary to accomplish their personal projects, but also be able to learn the techniques required by others. The materials fee provides student with an initial pack of glass, fuel for the torches and the loan of a full set of hand tools. Additional glass and supplies are available for purchase as the class progresses. This is a fun way to reinforce your skills while working with other great artists! Class Limit: 6 students
Instructor : Robert Kincheloe
Dates : Session A Sat/Sun April 23 & 24

Session B Sat/Sun May 28 & 29

Session C Sat/Sun June 25 & 26

Time : 11 am – 5pm
Tuition : $250 +$50 material fee (pay material fee to instructor in class)

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Class 1110 – Beginning Sculptural Flameworking
Learn the basics of making objects in the flame from borosilicate (Pyrex) glass. This 2-day class will focus on skills that are the basis of working with glass on the torch. You will come away with knowledge and some fine objects too! Rob is an energetic, knowledgeable instructor and artist who is ready and willing to help anyone learn this fascinating art form. The materials fee provides student with initial pack of glass, fuel for the torches and the loan of a full set of hand tools. Additional glass and supplies are available for purchase as the class progresses. Take this class more than once to reinforce your skills! Class Limit: 6 students
Instructor : Robert Kincheloe
Dates : Sat/Sun May 21 & 22
Time : 10 am – 1pm (the 1:30pm
to 5pm open lampwork studio directly following the class is free to any class member)
Tuition : $250 +$50 material fee (pay material fee to instructor in class)

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Class 1111 – Coldworking 101 – How to Grind and Polish


Learn how to incorporate coldworking techniques into your glass art. This 1-day class will focus on skills that are the basis of coldworking glass on the flat lap grinder. You will come away with knowledge and the ability to work safely and effectively with coldworking equipment! Robert will explain and demonstrate how the various pieces of equipment in the studio are used so that the students gain familiarity with what tools are available and how they can be properly utilized for glass art. The materials fee provides student with several “Blank” forms that they can use to practice these techniques. Students are also encouraged to bring small glass items that are less than 2″ in surface are to experiment with. Class Limit: 8 students
Instructor : Robert Kincheloe

Dates : Sat May 7
Time : 1pm to 5pm
Tuition : $130 +$20 material fee (pay material fee to instructor in class)

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PayPal WGS Spring/Summer 2011 Flamework Class Registration

Scroll down & Click on class listing



New Lampwork Class Schedule

>The New Winter Schedule for the Lampwork Concentrations is now online! – Have a squiz!

Class 1048 – Borosilicate CastingLearn to cast components for use in Flameworked Sculpture

Learn the process of borosilicate glass casting for component assembly in Flameworked sculpture. Students will review the process of casting as it relates to borosilicate glass. Once cast the component elements will then be flameworked into sculptural works of art. Come learn the process and develop your skills in this one of a kind class!

In this 4 day class students will make rubber molds of various items, review “lost wax casting” process, discuss firing schedules for casting borosilicate glass, practice coldworking processes to clean up the cast elements, and learn how to assemble numerous components at the bench torch for creating flameworked sculpture.

Day 1 – Class overview, Project Discussion, Rubber Mold Creation

Day 2 – Rubber mold prep, Wax and plaster investment, casting schedule and color discussion

Day 3 – Divestment and coldworking of components

Day 4 – Flameworking components into final sculpture

Instructor: Rob Kincheloe

Dates: Sat/Sun, Jan 22 & 23 and 29 & 30

Time: 10am to 1pm (the 1:30pm to 5pm open studio session directly following this class is free to any class member)

Tuition : $500 plus $100 material fee. (Pay material fees to instructor in class)


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Class 1049 – Beginning Sculptural Flameworking


Learn the basics of making objects in the flame from borosilicate (Pyrex) glass. This 2-day class will focus on skills that are the basis of working with glass on the torch. You will come away with knowledge and some fine objects too! Rob is an energetic, knowledgeable instructor and artist who is ready and willing to help anyone learn this fascinating art form. The materials fee provides student with initial pack of glass, fuel for the torches and the loan of a full set of hand tools. Additional glass and supplies are available for purchase as the class progresses. Take this class more than once to reinforce your skills! Class Limit: 6 students

Dates: This class will be offered 2 times this semester

Session 1049A – Sat/Sun Feb 5 & 6

Session 1049B – Sat/Sun Feb 26 & 27

Time: 10am to 1pm (the 1:30pm to 5pm open studio session directly following this class is free to any class member)

Tuition : $250 plus $50 material fee (Pay material fees to instructor in class)

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Class 1050 – Glass BeadmakingDeveloping Your Style

Glass beads have been objects of adornment for thousands of years, and are experiencing a popular revival. We will begin the class with a technical exploration of various foundation techniques essential to the success of all beadmakers and then progress to color, types of glass and ways of utilizing the properties of the medium. Whether as a component of a necklace or alone as a pendant, glass beads can also be an element of creative expression. Together we will begin a conversation about forms of jewelry, finding your palette and individual style.Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor : Clare J. Nykolyszyn

Dates : Sat/Sun March 19 & 20

Time : 10am to 1pm

Tuition : $250 plus $50 for materials (Pay material fees to instructor in class)

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Class 1051 – Flamework ClubOpen Studio For Flameworkers


Already know the basics of flameworking? Want to join others in a social atmosphere while you work? Our Flamework Club gives each student the opportunity to work independently in a world class studio while meeting some great new friends! Materials extra.Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor : Robert Kincheloe

Dates : Sat / Sun afternoons (call to confirm appointment)

Time : 1:30pm to 5pm

Tuition : $300 for 4 sessions or included with Instructor Classes

Elizabeth Ryland Mears

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Elizabeth Mears is an award winning artist who creates objects in glass and mixed media primarily through the glass blowing technique of Flamework. She studied at Penland School of Crafts, Pilchuck Glass School, and the Studio of the Corning Museum of Glass, receiving scholarships and eventually teaching at those same venues, as well as others. Her book, FLAMEWORKING, was published in 2003 by Lark Books, and she is a contributing author to PENLAND BOOK OF GLASS published in 2008 by Lark Books. In 2009 Mears was named a Master Artist for the state of Virginia, and she was one of four artists chosen to install work in the Capitol Hill office of Senator Mark Warner to represent the arts in Virginia
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Living in northern Virginia, she is inspired by nature in all seasons and forms.

Liz utilizes the forms of nature to create works of glass, which reflect her relationship to both her inner and her outer worlds. The glass is first worked in the mesmerizing flame of a bench torch then often is combined with other materials to become the exquisitely crafted and nationally exhibited objects for which she is known. Liz’s creations are represented by galleries throughout the nation and are included in numerous private, corporate (Mellon Bank Headquarters), and museum collections (Racine Art Museum, LOWE Museum) and have also been included in numerous magazine articles focused on contemporary glass art and books including: Women Working in Glass, Formed of Fire, 500 Glass Objects, Contemporary Lampworking, and Etched Glass.

Liz will be teaching two spectacular lampworking classes here at the Washington Glass School, where her love of nature and glass come together!

Class 1036 – Lets Make Leaves! with Elizabeth Ryland Mears
Why leaves you may ask. We will pay homage to Nature’s small factory (Bio 101…CO2 + chlorophyll, + sunshine = sugar and O2) while we learn to control the bench torch, manipulate hot glass, direct the heat, use tools to create shape and texture, and work with different sizes of clear rod and tube. The focus of our endeavors will be to make “parts” which can be incorporated into larger sculpture at a later time.
Dates: October 23/24, 10am til 1 pm, $350


Class 1037 – Building Flowers With Bridges! with Elizabeth Ryland Mears
“Bridges” are to Flameworking what exoskeletons are to beetles…they hold everything together. We will use the technique of “bridging” to make a daisy-like flower. We will make the flower then add the bridging to hold all the parts in place while we thoroughly fuse the glass together in the flame of the bench torch. This technique is invaluable when larger sculpture is created, so we will practice on a smaller object. The instructor will guide you step by step through the process. The bridging is temporary so will be removed to reveal a small object ready for further creative use.
Dates: November 06/07, 10am til 1 pm, $350

Click HERE to get more information about her classes at the Washington Glass School.

Liz will be teaching for a week next spring at Penland and a week at the Pittsburgh Glass Center in June 2011, and had just completed a Professional Artist in Residence (PAiR) at Pilchuck.

Glass Bead Conference Opens July 28

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The 2010 International Society of Glass Beadmakers (ISGB) Gathering will take place in Rochester, New York from July 28th – August 1st. This year’s conference theme is “Beyond Boundaries: Origins and Influence of the Glass Bead”. The conference will have tutorials, presentations, workshops, networking opportunities, and awards.

Leah Fairbanks, Michael Mangiafico, Kirsten Rasmussen, Dan Adams and Cynthia Toops are amongst the artists scheduled to present at the gathering.

Our torchworker extraordinaire, Robert Kincheloe, will be sending updates from the conference.


New Class Schedule Part 2 – Special Lampworking Classes

>Lampworking, torchwork, flamework – all mean the same thing – sculpting glass heated over a torch. You will get hooked on the immediate satisfaction that comes from this form of art! The flameworking program at the Washington Glass School has expanded. Take our beginner lampworking classes and build your skill level (and fun level) with the open studio Flamework Club. Or take the next step – with our Intermediate Sculptural Flamework class.

This class session we have brought on some new special classes with super star instructors: Elizabeth Mears and Michael Mangiafico!

Elizabeth Mears is a full time, award winning artist. Whether representational or conceptual, her artwork reflects her strong connection with nature; often combining glass with mixed media. Liz studied and now teaches lampworking techniques at Penland, Pilchuck and Corning Studio. Her book “Flameworking” was published in 2003 by Lark Books. Liz will draw upon her love of nature for her “Lets Make Leaves” class and her “Building Flowers with Bridges class.

Michael Mangiafico (Fig) graduated with a BFA in glass art from Carnegie Mellon University. He has been teaching lampworking and glass blowing for over 20 years. He owns and operates his own glass studio in Pittsburgh, Pa. His work is available in galleries nationwide and has been featured in numerous art magazines and publications. Fig will be teaching an amazing class on creating bugs “Glass Entomology“.

Have a look at the full Fall Lampworking Schedule:

SPECIAL LAMPWORKING CONCENTRATION CLASS SCHEDULE

Class 1032 – FLAMEWORK CLUB – Open Studio for Flameworkers

Already know the basics of flameworking? Want to join others in a social atmosphere while you work? Our Flamework Club gives each student the opportunity to work independently in a world class studio while meeting some great new friends! Materials extra.
Class Limit: 6 students
Instructor: Studio Staff
Dates: Saturday afternoons (call to confirm appointment)
Time: 1:30pm – 5 pm
Tuition: $300 for 4 sessions – or included with Instructor Classes (#1033, 1034, 1035, 1036, 1037)

flamework club


Class 1033 – Beginning Sculptural Flameworking

Learn the basics of making objects in the flame from borosilicate (Pyrex) glass. This 2-day class will focus on skills that are the basis of working with glass on the torch. You will come away with knowledge and some fine objects too! Rob is an energetic, knowledgeable instructor and artist who is ready and willing to help anyone learn this fascinating art form. The materials fee provides student with initial pack of glass, fuel for the torches and the loan of a full set of hand tools. Additional glass and supplies are available for purchase as the class progresses. Take this class more than once to reinforce your skills! Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor: Robert Kincheloe
Dates: Session A Sept 18 & 19, Session B Oct 2 & 3

Time: 10am – 1 pm
Tuition: $250 + $50 material fee

robert.kincheloe.glass


Class 1034 – Intermediate Sculptural Flameworking / Working Hollow

This is a student driven class that will promote techniques not displayed in the beginning class. In this 2-day class, students will learn to work with tubing to create glass sculptures. (materials cost of $50 payable at first class meeting) Class Limit: 6 students

Instructor: Robert Kincheloe
Dates: Saturday / Sunday, November 20 & 21
Time: 10 am – 1 pm
Tuition: $250 + $50 material fee

lampworking.glass


Class 1035 – Glass Entomology - Lampworked Insects with Michael Mangiafico
Students will learn to work with soft glass while observing nature. Students will explore heat control, cane pulling and the basics of soft glass sculpting. His glass insects are some of the finest examples of lampwork worldwide.

Michael Mangiafico has been teaching torchworking and glass blowing since 1993. While his specialty is making glass insects, he also makes beads, marbles, jewelry, vessels, and paperweights. Class Limit: 6 students
Instructor: Michael Mangiafico
Dates: Saturday / Sunday, October 9 & 10
Time: 10 am – 1 pm
Tuition: $300 + $50 material fee

fig studio.glass


Class 1036 – Lets Make Leaves! with Elizabeth Ryland Mears

Why leaves you may ask. We will pay homage to Nature’s small factory (Bio 101…CO2 + chlorophyll, + sunshine = sugar and O2) while we learn to control the bench torch, manipulate hot glass, direct the heat, use tools to create shape and texture, and work with different sizes of clear rod and tube. The focus of our endeavors will be to make “parts” which can be incorporated into larger sculpture at a later time. Class Limit: 6 Students

Instructor: Elizabeth Ryland Mears
Dates: Saturday / Sunday, October 23 & 24
Time: 10 am – 1 pm
Tuition: $300 + $50 material fee

elizabth_ryland_mears


Class 1037 – Building Flowers With Bridges! with Elizabeth Ryland Mears

“Bridges” are to Flameworking what exoskeletons are to beetles…they hold everything together. We will use the technique of “bridging” to make a daisy-like flower. We will make the flower then add the bridging to hold all the parts in place while we thoroughly fuse the glass together in the flame of the bench torch. This technique is invaluable when larger sculpture is created, so we will practice on a smaller object. The instructor will guide you step by step through the process. The bridging is temporary so will be removed to reveal a small object ready for further creative use. Class Limit: 6 Students

Instructor: Elizabeth Ryland Mears
Dates: Saturday / Sunday, November 6 & 7
Time: 10 am – 1 pm
Tuition: $300 + $50 material fee


For more information about classes – or to register and pay for the class using the online PayPal system, click HERE to jump to the school’s website class list.