Boro Casting

>

A casting kiln loaded with boro.

Robert Kincheloe has been developing a method of casting using borosilicate glass (aka “hard” glass or 33 C.O.E or Pyrex) and creating components that can later be assembled into Flameworked sculpture.

Rob Kincheloe prepping the glass to be invested into the molds.

Here Rob had made plaster/silica molds via the “lost wax casting” process, and is now loading into the kiln, investing with boro glass.
His process of merging warm and hot glass practices creates one of a kind sculptural works of art.

Rob arranging the molds inside the kiln – ensuring even heating.

Placing the “hard” glass into the molds

Rob documents each step of the process for his posting online.

“Crashing” the kiln to take the glass out of devit range.

The red-hot glass at 2100º F

Some of the cast boro elements – showing the translucent colors. These elements will later be flameworked into sculpture.

Lampworking Class Gets Hot!

>

Photos by Mike Raman

The Washington Glass School’s new torchworking classes started off Session A in fine form. The hands-on class works thru the basics of making objects on the torch. Here instructor Robert Kincheloe works with each student to master using borosilicate glass.

Teddie Hathaway heats up her glass skills.

The next beginner’s lampworking class starts in June – Click HERE to read more about the class & schedule.

Glass Line Magazine: Q & A with Paul Stankard

>The May issue of Glass Line magazine has an article by legendary flameworker Paul Stankard, where Paul had sought questions from other lampworkers and the article creates the feeling of a casual discussion with one of the glass greats. Below is a short excerpt from the article:

Sharing a Journey: Questions and Answers - by Paul Stankard –
Over the last two years, I’ve met a large number of borosilicate flameworkers making everything from jewelry to glass pipes who are yearning to do significant creative work and explore new boundaries. They have a strong commitment to the independent lifestyle as studio artists and many make their livings through their highly developed skills. They are not satisfied with staying in one creative place and have larger ambitions. I relate to their struggle to channel their technical abilities into something more significant by creating sculpture. What’s holding many of them back, however, is a lack of artistic maturity. Few of them went to art school, and they are often simply unaware of what is considered important work by the larger world of collectors, galleries, and museum curators.

What I’ve been promoting with these Glass Line articles is excellence, but the notion of “excellence” is defined by the community you belong to. You can be an excellent goblet-maker, an excellent paperweight-maker, an excellent beadmaker, and on and on. To be excellent in these tightly defined categories, you need to recognize what is masterwork and be familiar with the skilled artists and craftspeople advancing the tradition with whom you want to strive to compete. You then can take advantage of the respect you’ve achieved in these decorative-arts categories to catapult yourself into the greater glass community. By competing with the past and matching the category’s history, you’ll be at the front of your field.
Our resident torchwork artist, Robert Kincheloe is one of the artists that is featured in the article with Paul.

If you are a subscriber to the magazine, you can read the article online – click HERE.

Introducing Washington Glass School’s New Studio Coordinator

>

Robert Kincheloe (right)


The Washington Glass School welcomes its new studio coordinator: Robert Kincheloe. Robert has been working with glass since 1997, with a strong background in borosilicate glass. He has studied furnace glassblowing, flameworking, scientific glassblowing, sculpture, murrini, encasements, casting and coldworking. Over the years he has helped to set up several glass studios and has spent the last two years as a studio artist at the Workhouse Arts Center in Lorton, VA.

Robert’s work centers on the use of combining hot, warm and cold glass processes, and he takes a mathematical approach to design. This encourages him to repeat a technique over and over in search of perfecting the logic of the design and controlling its process.

Robert hopes to expand the glass community through his works, classes, demos and lectures, and as such, he will be creating a new series of flameworking borosilicate classes here at the glass school.

Floral Cube by Robert Kincheloe

photo: AnythingPhotographic

Robert was part of the Washington Post’s article on the opening of the Workhouse Arts Center in 2008 – click HERE to read the article.


Robert at his torch @ Lorton. He has since escaped the former prison.

Photo: Dayna Smith for the Washington Post.