Erwin Timmers New Sculpture Made from Cast Recycled Glass

Eco-artist Erwin Timmers newest sculpture made from cast recycled glass will be showcased at the Gateway Arts District’s Open Studio Tour (OST) – Saturday May 14, 2016 from Noon-5pm.

Erwin has been casting with recycled float (window) glass to create forms from and about discarded water bottles – and assembling the cast glass atop a salvaged mirror that has been backed with LED lighting. Its amazing how he can find harmony, balance and poetry in things discarded and never thought of again.

Erwin Timmers, cast recycled glass, salvaged  mirror, steel, LED, 2016

Erwin Timmers, cast recycled glass, salvaged mirror, steel, LED, 2016

Erwin Timmers: The Art of Recycling

>Erwin Timmers’ artwork and sculpture using recycled and components diverted from the waste stream had caught the eye of a photojournalist, and his work so intrigued her that she made a short documentary about Erwin’s work and philosophy. Below is a link to the video made by Uliana Bazar:

The Art of Recycling With Erwin Timmers from uliana bazar on Vimeo.

Uliana Bazar is currently working on a Masters in New Media Photojournalism at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC.

Making Functional Art From Recycled Materials Class

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The Eco-Tables class- where the students create the tables using recycled materials (both reclaimed steel & glass) just completed – here are some photos from the class!

The class first creating the table-tops, working with salvaged and recycled float glass.


After fusing the recycled glass, the tops were coldworked and made smooth.

Erwin Timmers – DC’s leading “Green-artist” outlines what is required to make the metal work support. Some students are overwhelmed.

Erwin outlines step-by-step the procedures to cut, weld and grind smooth the steelwork.

Some of the students were stylin’ in the welding helmets and green welding jackets.

Teaching Assistant Laurie Brown supervises the metal working.


Soon, tables are marching out from the coldshop.


The students – some who have never cut glass or welded before – are amazed at their artwork and celebrate their progress. “What’s next?
” is on each student’s mind.
The new class schedule is due out soon – Keep posted for the listing!

Washington Post Magazine Features Environmental Artist Erwin Timmers

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photo by Ben Tankersley / Washington Post

The Washington Post Sunday Magazine has a great article about how Erwin Timmers is able to source artwork from ordinary cast-offs. Washington Post writer Kris Coronado interviewed Erwin for the “Closer Inspection” column of the magazine, and spent the day at the school with photographer Ben Tankersley, wanting to know the story of seemingly every piece of glass they found.



Washington Post’s Ben Tankersley sets up an impromptu photo studio for Erwin Timmers work



Kris writes: “Erwin Timmers, artist and co-founder of the Washington Glass School in Mount Rainier, has taken recycling to heart. “That’s my carbon footprint,” he jokes, pointing to a depression of his boot set in the large slab of repurposed green glass hung on the wall. “I like using objects that everybody recognizes that are everyday, common items,” he says, “that people don’t really realize what value they have … until they end up in the trash heap.”



Washington Post Magazine “Closer Inspection” Sunday, August 21, 2011

Get your paper this weekend! Or for those looking to minimize their carbon footprint – click HERE to read the article online. Want to know more about Erwin’s upcoming class on fusing with recycled glass or making tables with recycled glass? Click HERE to jump to the Washington Glass School online class list.

Alison Sigethy Solo Show @ The Art League Gallery

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Eco-artist Alison Sigethy’s solo artist exhibit Understory, January 6 – February 7, 2011 will be featured in The Art League Gallery at the Torpedo Factory Art Center on Alexandria’s Potomac River waterfront.

Alison Sigethy draws inspiration from the natural world surrounding her – from her works made from natural fibers to sculptures made from recycled glass. Her multimedia solo exhibit, Understory, will be featured in The Art League Gallery, January 6 – February 7, 2011.

With this collection of works, Sigethy is creating an installation that invites the viewer to explore the often unnoticed, yet essential parts of the forest. She emphasizes the “quiet beauty” of the unseen through layers of glass fungi, collages that evoke the striations of cliff sides, and delicate snowflakes.

Alison works almost exclusively with recycled materials; the majority of her glass comes from the lenses of solar collectors. Dead tree trunks and driftwood collected on her kayaking sojourns are used as anchors for delicate crystalline elements. The use of these salvaged materials reinforces a pervasive theme in Alison’s work: we, as a culture, generate too much waste. How can we reuse “trash” to create something beautiful? After leaving the world of marketing and print production to pursue both art and kayaking, Sigethy was drawn to glass for its various hues and effect on light.

A trip to Greenland in 2006 inspired her to work with recycled materials to create her environmentally conscious work.

One of the Washington Glass School’s instructors, Alison was named Torpedo Factory “Artist of the Year” in 2010.

Understory

The Art League Gallery , Room 21

The Torpedo Factory Art Center

105 N. Union St.

Alexandria, VA 22314

Exhibit Dates: January 6 – February 7

Opening Reception:Thursday, January 13th (special performance by Karen Reedy Dance) 6:30-8pm

Artist Talk: 7:00 pm on Thursday, January 20th

Afternoon performance by storyteller Laura J. Bobrow at 1:00 on Sunday, January 23rd

Environmental Art in NYC

>Excess and Environment:

sustainability in a world of consumption

“What We Leave Behind” by Erwin Timmers

Materials: cast recycled window glass, steel. Dimensions: 70″ x 50″ x 16″

The beautiful dark green glass with gold highlights was recovered from the construction site of a Virginia office building where the building was undergoing a cosmetic updating of the facade. The spandrel glass discarded from the old building was used as the basis of the cast glass panels.



About the exhibition: “Excess and Environment”

The presence of excess exists in our day-to-day lives, but often hides behind masks of disposal systems, social acceptance, and misinformation.
This exhibition explores the idea of the impact of our excess on our natural environment both visually and theoretically. The art involved will relate to mass consumption and waste’s effects on the environment. Art using these excess materials as a medium will also represent this concept of sustainability in the midst of excess.

Excess and Environment

Opening Reception:

Friday, April 16th 2010

7:00 pm to 11:00 pm

AE Studios LIC, 39-06 Crescent Street, Long Island City, Queens, NY 11101

(One stop on the subway away from Midtown Manhattan)



Artists showing work include Chris Jordan, Eve Mosher, Walter “Tinho” Nomura, Justin Gignac, Akirash, Mikal Hameed, Erwin Timmers, Miles Wickham, Beau Stanton, Destroy and Rebuild, Christina Chobot, Trash Track and more.



“What We Leave Behind” Erwin Timmers

Detail: images of panels depicting the 1980′s and 2000′s




According to the artist, the series, What We Leave Behind was conceived from the viewpoint of an archaeologist, who might, centuries from now, uncover artifacts from our era. Just like the archaeologist, you are looking down to uncover the items. Elements are recognizable from the various decades … objects once in popular use but now resting in landfills.



The title of the work is based on the book about our culture of excess and the impact our trash will continue to make long after we are gone: “The World Without Us” by Alan Weisman.



The profits from the art sold at this exhibit will be split between the artists and Art for Global Justice, so that we may sustain the local artist community and keep Art for Global Justice’s youth workshops and art exchange program going.

SALVAGE: Reclaiming Recycling

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What We Leave Behind cast recycled glass, steel

Erwin Timmers



The Phillips Museum of Art selected our eco-artist Erwin Timmers’ recycled cast glass artwork for an innovative exhibit “SALVAGE: Reclaiming Recycling.” Works in the exhibit were chosen from a national call to artists.

With current emphasis on green initiatives, the exhibit, “comprising 100% used and found objects, will challenge people to rethink their relationships with ‘disposable’ objects,” said Christine Batta, one of the curators. “We want to challenge artists to reduce their carbon footprint, while making the public more aware of the different ways one can be more sustainable” added co-curator Nicole DeAugustine.

The exhibition opens on September 10 and will run through October 30, 2009 in the Rothman Gallery and the Sally Mather Gibson Curriculum Gallery at the Museum.

An artists’ reception and awards presentation will take place Saturday, Sept. 19 at 1 PM.

The Phillips Museum of Art

700 College Ave, Lancaster, PA 17603


Erwin Timmers new work (Knot)!

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Erwin Timmers works on his new pieces – cast recycled glass knotts. Erwin fires the glass into plaster/silica molds and then chips away the plaster from the cooled glass. Hours of coldworking ensues after. Mr Timmers has engineered a ‘hands-free’ device to work the diamond lap wheel. Erwin’s new pieces will be on display at the Craftweek DC demonstrations in the studio this week.

Kevin Mellema Reviews Target Gallery’s "Reclaimed"

>Kevin Mellema – (one of the few print media art critics left covering the DC area) writes his review of the Torpedo Factory’s Target Gallery exhibition of artwork made from recycled components – “Reclaimed”. Curated by Light Street Gallery owners Linda & Steve Krensky, the show features an international group of eco-artists. Erwin Timmers’ cast recylcled glass and steel artwork “What We Leave Behind” is shown here – photography by Anything Photographic.

Here is part of the text from the Falls Church News Press article:

And Then There Was Art

‘Reclaimed,’ at the Target Gallery in the Torpedo Factory (105 N. Union St., Alexandria). This exhibit runs through April 26. For more details, call 703-838-4565 ext. 4 or visit torpedofactory.org/galleries/target.htm.

Of all the galleries around town, the Target Gallery consistently does the best job of bringing in work from outside the Metro area. Target Gallery’s open call shows are truly open to all comers, where other galleries around town offer open call shows to Metro area or, at most, to Mid-Atlantic artists. The Target Gallery typically brings in work from across the nation, with a few international pieces as well.

The D.C. area art scene operates in a bit of a bubble without any real connection to the outside world. We don’t even have a decent connection to Baltimore, and we’re practically joined at the hip. It seems to be a problem in general, but the Target Gallery is doing what it can to fight that insular structure.

“Reclaimed” is a recycled materials show juried by Steven and Linda Krensky, Linda being the art dealer and Steve being the biggest art hound in town, seeming to magically appear at every art opening. The 33 works on view were culled from over 450 entries.

Recycled shows can run the gamut from interesting to literally rubbish by a different name. Good recycled art runs off the act of raw creativity in its playful and innovative use of appropriated materials. In a sense, the work has the same underlying ethos of high-end design work. While high-end design operates in that rare environment where money is no object, recycled art hits at the other end of the spectrum, where money is not required. One could debate who’s got the creative upper hand here, but you’ve got to admire the folks making something from nothing.

Of the 14 area artists in the mix, Erwin Timmers of the Washington Glass School gang shows his archaeologically-inspired take on 1980s era personal technology, titled “What We Leave Behind.” Adam Bradley assembled one of those ever-so-cool “Jet Pack” sculptures that takes us back to an innocent age of space travel and boyhood dreams. Honestly now, who doesn’t want to have a jet pack of their very own?

“Podulator” by John Stephenson of Boone, N.C. riffs on the same vibe with a Deco-era teardrop auto headlight assembly brought into the hyper-cool space age 1950s with assorted metal bits attached. With auto parts running amok, Mexican artist Alfonso Arambula Robles crafted “Chat Noir,” a cat with its back up and hair standing on end, using half of a car tire and screws to depict the respective cat parts…

Click here for the complete article.

Erwin Timmers featured in Target Gallery Show

>Erwin Timmers will be showing in a cool new show opening soon at Torpedo Factory’s Target Gallery
Erwin Timmers ‘What We Leave Behind’
cast recycled glass, steel, silver 2008. Photography by Anything Photographic

Reclaimed
April 1 -26, 2009
Reception: April 9, 6-8pm
Gallery Talk: 7pm

Reclaimed, an exhibition that focuses on everyday common objects that are reclaimed, recycled, reinterpreted and transformed into art. From Marcel Duchamp’s “ready-mades” to Robert Rauschenberg’s “combines”, artists have been for years recycling and reclaiming everyday common objects and transforming them into something new and unique. This exhibition is open to all artists nationally and internationally to submit work that has been reclaimed and transformed into their own personal artistic statement. The jurors for this exhibition was gallery owners Steven and Linda Krensky.