Environmental Art in NYC

>Excess and Environment:

sustainability in a world of consumption

“What We Leave Behind” by Erwin Timmers

Materials: cast recycled window glass, steel. Dimensions: 70″ x 50″ x 16″

The beautiful dark green glass with gold highlights was recovered from the construction site of a Virginia office building where the building was undergoing a cosmetic updating of the facade. The spandrel glass discarded from the old building was used as the basis of the cast glass panels.



About the exhibition: “Excess and Environment”

The presence of excess exists in our day-to-day lives, but often hides behind masks of disposal systems, social acceptance, and misinformation.
This exhibition explores the idea of the impact of our excess on our natural environment both visually and theoretically. The art involved will relate to mass consumption and waste’s effects on the environment. Art using these excess materials as a medium will also represent this concept of sustainability in the midst of excess.

Excess and Environment

Opening Reception:

Friday, April 16th 2010

7:00 pm to 11:00 pm

AE Studios LIC, 39-06 Crescent Street, Long Island City, Queens, NY 11101

(One stop on the subway away from Midtown Manhattan)



Artists showing work include Chris Jordan, Eve Mosher, Walter “Tinho” Nomura, Justin Gignac, Akirash, Mikal Hameed, Erwin Timmers, Miles Wickham, Beau Stanton, Destroy and Rebuild, Christina Chobot, Trash Track and more.



“What We Leave Behind” Erwin Timmers

Detail: images of panels depicting the 1980′s and 2000′s




According to the artist, the series, What We Leave Behind was conceived from the viewpoint of an archaeologist, who might, centuries from now, uncover artifacts from our era. Just like the archaeologist, you are looking down to uncover the items. Elements are recognizable from the various decades … objects once in popular use but now resting in landfills.



The title of the work is based on the book about our culture of excess and the impact our trash will continue to make long after we are gone: “The World Without Us” by Alan Weisman.



The profits from the art sold at this exhibit will be split between the artists and Art for Global Justice, so that we may sustain the local artist community and keep Art for Global Justice’s youth workshops and art exchange program going.

Erwin Timmers Environmental Artwork Sculpture

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Erwin Timmer’s original concept sketch for the cast recycled glass panel sculpture.


The actual installation of the glass sculpture. The vision and reality are a close match!

This weekend, Erwin Timmers installed a major commissioned art work for the new environmentally conscious building at 1129 20th St. NW, Washington, DC, also known as “The Liberty Building“.

1129 20th St, NW, Washington, DC

Working together with Anna Major of Fox Architects and building owner John Gattuso, the wall sculpture is a site–specific piece that has a dialog with Margaret Boozer’s ceramic artwork installation also in the building lobby.

The owner wanted artwork with a vertical orientation to echo the architectural aspects of the space, mounted atop the subtle-textured white limestone wall. Although the building and its lobby are very minimalist in design, a strong artwork was desired to work in contrast. In the owners words, the wall is beautiful, but sooner or later people are going to ask him, “…when are you going put up the art?”

The wall sculpture created by casting with recycled window glass is central to the concept of this piece. Erwin was selected for the commission in part because of his use of sustainable design in his artwork, and his use of recycled glass has the artwork keep in the nature of the building’s LEED gold certified design. Window glass or float glass is one of the least recycled building materials and many recycling advocacy organizations and programs consider it the pariah of their work. Less than 3% percent of discarded float glass is recycled, and this project provided the opportunity to divert at least some from the waste stream.

Erwin Timmers installing the recycled glass artwork on the limestone wall.

There is also a great play between the lobby artworks, where Margaret Boozer’s work is stone on glass, and Erwin’s incorporates glass on stone. Erwin commented that his glass sculpture also references modern technology and communication – the final design is actually based on the word “ART” in barcode language.

Erwin Timmers sculpture left, Margaret Boozer’s sculpture beyond.

Click HERE to see more of Erwin Timmers’ environmental based artwork.

Sculpture NOW 2010

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The Washington Sculptors Group held a competition amongst its members for the Sculpture NOW 2010 exhibition opening Jan 5 at DC’s Edison Place Gallery. The juror for the show was Ryan Hill. Ryan is the Curatorial Research Associate for the Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden. He also teaches art courses as an Adjunct Professor at George Washington University and is a working artist.

For the WSG show, Ryan has chosen artworks that use non-traditional materials, explore layering and decentered compositions and reflect our information-driven society. Our Washington Glass School director, Erwin Timmers has work selected to be featured in the show.

Please join us on opening night and to see the latest works of DC sculptors: Karen Bondarchuk, Leah Frankel, Kerry Furlani, Tom Greaves, Jason Haber, Ray Hau, Leila Holtsman, James Mallos, Bill Moore, Elena Patino, Mike Shaffer, John Simpkins-Camp, Erwin Timmers, Patricia Tinajero, Elizabeth Whiteley, and Alice Yutzy.

When: Friday, January 5, 2010, 6-8pm
Where: Pepco’s Edison Place Gallery

702 8th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20001

Washington Sculptors Group, founded in 1984, promotes an awareness and an understanding of sculpture and fosters the exchange of ideas among sculptors, collectors and the general public. For more information on WSG, click HERE.

Erwin Timmers Work in New Book

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Our leader of sustainable design – Erwin Timmers – has his artwork made from recycled glass included in a new book out next month – “1000 Ideas for Creative Reuse” by Garth Johnson. Featuring 21st Century craft and design, it is an inventive collection of cutting edge work made from recycled, upcycled, repurposed and reused items.

ISBN: 9781592535408
Due November 2009

Paperback
1000 photos/illustrations
320 Pages

The author, Garth Johnson is a studio artist, writer and educator, in addition to maintaining the website “Exteme Craft“. Garth writes for CRAFT magazine and his writing has been featured in museum catalogs, magazines, and books worldwide, including a contribution to the upcoming book Handmade Nation from Princeton Architectural Press. Garth is currently a full-time instructor at College of the Redwoods in Eureka, CA.

Click HERE for the publishers link to the book.

Erwin Timmers teaches about the use of recycled materials in an upcoming class “Recycled Your Glass” – a great class to take to see how you can become part of the Green Movement in glass! Erwin’s class takes place over three nights, Nov 4, 11, 18. Click HERE to see the class info.

Erwin Timmers EcoArtwork

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The ‘g Green Design Center in Massachusetts is hosting a juried art show titled “ReMade”, where artwork using reclaimed, recycled and reused materials are featured in an inventive show. Each of Erwin Timmers’ cast recycled glass knots submitted for the show were selected for inclusion.

Jurors included:
Elizabeth Hunter, Executive Director, Cape Cod Museum of Art
Gayle Morrow Olsen, Founder, Color Obsessions Gallery, Mashpee
Jan Lhormer, Artist and Curator, Falmouth

g 28 Bates Road, North Market Mashpee Commons, Mashpee, MA 02649.
The opening reception for ReMade will be Friday, October 9th from 5:30 – 7:30pm

Congratulations Erwin!

SALVAGE: Reclaiming Recycling

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What We Leave Behind cast recycled glass, steel

Erwin Timmers



The Phillips Museum of Art selected our eco-artist Erwin Timmers’ recycled cast glass artwork for an innovative exhibit “SALVAGE: Reclaiming Recycling.” Works in the exhibit were chosen from a national call to artists.

With current emphasis on green initiatives, the exhibit, “comprising 100% used and found objects, will challenge people to rethink their relationships with ‘disposable’ objects,” said Christine Batta, one of the curators. “We want to challenge artists to reduce their carbon footprint, while making the public more aware of the different ways one can be more sustainable” added co-curator Nicole DeAugustine.

The exhibition opens on September 10 and will run through October 30, 2009 in the Rothman Gallery and the Sally Mather Gibson Curriculum Gallery at the Museum.

An artists’ reception and awards presentation will take place Saturday, Sept. 19 at 1 PM.

The Phillips Museum of Art

700 College Ave, Lancaster, PA 17603


Erwin Timmers goes West

>The Taos Insitute for Glass Art hosts an annual juried nation-wide competition, showcasing 40 years of Studio Art Glass. Erwin Timmers’ cast recycled glass and steel panels were selected by two of the participating galleries; 203 Fine Art, and Hulse Warman Gallery. Both galleries will show Erwin’s work during the events. Congratulations Erwin!

203 Fine Art
203 Ledoux Street
Taos, NM

Hulse Warman Gallery
222 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte
Taos, NM

July 16 – August 16, 2009

Opening Reception July 18, 2009

Erwin Timmers new work (Knot)!

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Erwin Timmers works on his new pieces – cast recycled glass knotts. Erwin fires the glass into plaster/silica molds and then chips away the plaster from the cooled glass. Hours of coldworking ensues after. Mr Timmers has engineered a ‘hands-free’ device to work the diamond lap wheel. Erwin’s new pieces will be on display at the Craftweek DC demonstrations in the studio this week.

Kevin Mellema Reviews Target Gallery’s "Reclaimed"

>Kevin Mellema – (one of the few print media art critics left covering the DC area) writes his review of the Torpedo Factory’s Target Gallery exhibition of artwork made from recycled components – “Reclaimed”. Curated by Light Street Gallery owners Linda & Steve Krensky, the show features an international group of eco-artists. Erwin Timmers’ cast recylcled glass and steel artwork “What We Leave Behind” is shown here – photography by Anything Photographic.

Here is part of the text from the Falls Church News Press article:

And Then There Was Art

‘Reclaimed,’ at the Target Gallery in the Torpedo Factory (105 N. Union St., Alexandria). This exhibit runs through April 26. For more details, call 703-838-4565 ext. 4 or visit torpedofactory.org/galleries/target.htm.

Of all the galleries around town, the Target Gallery consistently does the best job of bringing in work from outside the Metro area. Target Gallery’s open call shows are truly open to all comers, where other galleries around town offer open call shows to Metro area or, at most, to Mid-Atlantic artists. The Target Gallery typically brings in work from across the nation, with a few international pieces as well.

The D.C. area art scene operates in a bit of a bubble without any real connection to the outside world. We don’t even have a decent connection to Baltimore, and we’re practically joined at the hip. It seems to be a problem in general, but the Target Gallery is doing what it can to fight that insular structure.

“Reclaimed” is a recycled materials show juried by Steven and Linda Krensky, Linda being the art dealer and Steve being the biggest art hound in town, seeming to magically appear at every art opening. The 33 works on view were culled from over 450 entries.

Recycled shows can run the gamut from interesting to literally rubbish by a different name. Good recycled art runs off the act of raw creativity in its playful and innovative use of appropriated materials. In a sense, the work has the same underlying ethos of high-end design work. While high-end design operates in that rare environment where money is no object, recycled art hits at the other end of the spectrum, where money is not required. One could debate who’s got the creative upper hand here, but you’ve got to admire the folks making something from nothing.

Of the 14 area artists in the mix, Erwin Timmers of the Washington Glass School gang shows his archaeologically-inspired take on 1980s era personal technology, titled “What We Leave Behind.” Adam Bradley assembled one of those ever-so-cool “Jet Pack” sculptures that takes us back to an innocent age of space travel and boyhood dreams. Honestly now, who doesn’t want to have a jet pack of their very own?

“Podulator” by John Stephenson of Boone, N.C. riffs on the same vibe with a Deco-era teardrop auto headlight assembly brought into the hyper-cool space age 1950s with assorted metal bits attached. With auto parts running amok, Mexican artist Alfonso Arambula Robles crafted “Chat Noir,” a cat with its back up and hair standing on end, using half of a car tire and screws to depict the respective cat parts…

Click here for the complete article.