Glass Sparks: Jackie Greeves

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Entre Nous

Glass, kumbu, copper wire, copper electroformed perimeter
15″ x 19 1/2″ x 1/2″

Jackie Greeves

In the past thirty years, Jackie Greeves has evolved from being a nationally recognized studio potter, an enamelist whose work was exhibited both nationally and internationally, and an award winning glass artist. What has remained consistent has been the artist reaching for the emotional presentation of themes from her early training in Japan.


Quand Je Pense
Glass, .999 silver foil, .999 silver wire, copper wire, copper electroformed
perimeter
14 1/2″ x 14″ x 1/2″

In the 1960’s, she received a degree in Biology and Chemistry and worked as a bacteriologist for the Food and Drug Administration. In the early ‘70’s she spent three years studying ceramics in Tokyo, Japan with master Yamagami Norikazu. During her time as a ceramicist, she was a recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant for her work in clay and was a frequent exhibitor in both the Philadelphia Craft Show and the Smithsonian Craft Show.

During the 1980’s, Jackie also served as advisor for the Mayor’s Committee on Art and Culture in Baltimore, Maryland; as exhibit director of the Tomlinson Craft Collection in Baltimore; and as assistant to the Dean, Maryland College of Art and Design in Silver Spring, Maryland.

In the 1990’s, Jackie began metalsmithing and enameling at Montgomery College, where she is presently an adjunct professor in the art department.

From the 2000’s until present, Jackie has pursued the use of glass in combination with enamel and its techniques, is presently working in metal and glass creating small sculptures evoking a sense of depth and emotion. Jackie has taught courses on copper electroforming at the Washington Glass School over the years

Jackie will be one of the artists exhibiting at DC’s Longview Gallery juried invitational exhibition showcasing the people and work of the artists of the Washington Glass School.

Washington Glass School: The First 10 Years

LongView Gallery

1234 9th Street, NW, Washington, DC
May 19 – June 19, Opening Reception, May 19th, 6:30-8:30 PM

"Material World" Artist Talk at artdc Gallery

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Material World opened this weekend at artdc Gallery. The show focuses on artists and how they balance the use of materials and content.

This Saturday from 2-3 pm there will be a gallery talk featuring three artists: Sherill Anne Gross, Marie Ringwald and Michael Janis.

Material World
artdc Gallery

5710 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, MD

Open thru April 3, 2011

Artists exhibiting include: Michael Janis, Marie Ringwald, Matthew Langely, JT Kirkland, Katherine Mann and Sherill Anne Gross. A second artist talk featuring Matt Langley will be held Saturday, April 2.

Marie Ringwald
Chunky Patchwork Sheds
paint, wood, tar paper, various metals + nails
; each about 6.5″ high x 5.5″ x 5.5″

Curator Stephen Boocks writes in the catalog of the show: “Marie Ringwald refers to herself as a minimalist but most viewers would not readily characterize her work that way.There are clear associations to architectural structures, primarily warehouses and barns…For Ringwald, developing in the 60s and 70s, minimalist abstraction seemed the most natural way of making art. After years of working in this manner she realized she was incorporating these architectural elements into her abstract works began asking, “Why not bring them out into the open? Why not incorporate the actual materials used in the construction of these structures?”

Michael Janis
Again and Again – glass, fused glass powder imagery, steel, 20″ x 20″

In the exhibition catalog “Material World – Art Supplies in the Twentyfirst Century” curator Boocks writes: “When most people think of glass art, they typically think of blown glass (or hot glass) vessels like those of Dale Chihuly… Michael Janis works in the warm glass method that fuses glass elements together into one piece by layering multiple glass sheets together. The virtuosity of Janis’ technique supports his imagery, which is often tinged with a nostalgia for days where innocence reigned and magic seemed possible. Janis is not simply naïve, for there is a darker undercurrent to these works that speaks to the loss of this sense of wonder.”

Sherill Anne Gross
Blood Sweat and Tears – paper, 18″ x 11″

“To say Sherill Anne Gross is obsessed with paper is an understatement. When the local Pearl art supply store went out of business, Gross purchased all of her favorite papers and many others to build quite a stock of materialsShe is not only obsessive about her materials but also about her technique”…writes Boocks.

Here is a video of talented paper artist Sherill Gross as she cuts out her signature:

Click HERE for a link to the artdc Gallery catalog of the Material World exhibition.

When Hot Glass & Gunpowder Mix…

>From VCU – Kristoff Kamrath creates a hot-shop portrait of Neda using the materials found on every college campus – gunpowder.


I think the imagery and title refer to the death of Neda Agha-Soltan – a bystander whose murder drew international attention after she was killed during the 2009 Iranian election protests. The gunshot that took her life, as well as her last words : “I’m burning, I’m burning!” make this a powerful piece.

Thanks to Superpostition for the link!

10th Annual Bay Area Glass Institute Auction

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Ethan Stern – Saber T


The Bay Area Glass Institute (BAGI) Presents its 10th Annual GREAT GLASS AUCTION
Saturday, March 26, 2011 5:30-9:30 pm

Preston Singletary

The Benefit supports emerging glass artists, aspiring students and public glass art education
Come join California Bay Area glass lovers, artists, collectors, and patrons as they bid on nearly one hundred pieces of exquisite fine art glass donated by well-known local, national and international artists at the 2011 Great Glass Auction, on Saturday, March 26, 2011 from 5:30-9:30 p.m., in the Cultural Hall at the Palo Alto Jewish Community Center (JCC). The special evening features silent and live auctions of one-of-a-kind glass art and also awards to outstanding glass artists.

A highlight of the Auction evening will be the announcement of the prestigious Saxe Fellowship Award for outstanding craftsmanship and achievement in glass chosen in a juried competition, as well as the People’s Choice Award, selected by auction attendees, that honors the best piece contributed by a local artist. The Saxe Fellowship jurors this year are: Susan Krane, Executive Director, San Jose Museum of Arts and world renowned collector Dorothy Saxe of San Francisco, California.

Demetra Theofanous

New Materiality opens in Milwaukee

>In 2010, the Fuller Craft Museum mounted and exhibition about how new technologies – digital video, computerized design – were being blended with traditional craft materials to forge new artistic visions, titled The New Materiality: Digital Dialogues at the Boundaries of Contemporary Craft Curated by Fo Wilson, the show featured works by WGS’ Tim Tate. The exhibition has traveled to the Milwaukee Art Museum – opening March 10 – June 12, 2011.

Click HERE to jump to Milwaukee Art Museum’s web posting of the show.

British New Wave Glass

>The UK’s Crafts Council presents new work by 17 pioneering British glass makers as a way to illustrate contemporary ideas developed from traditional glass blowing processes. The traveling exhibition is presented as the “British new wave”. While the exhibition claims to feature a new wave, some artists remain more rooted in the Studio Glass movement than some of their more experimental American counterparts.

El Ultimo Grito’s ‘Apartments’ is an imaginary architectural form created from repurposed scientific glass products. On first viewing, the pieces seem to be lifted from the laboratory but on closer inspection their function has been re-appropriated; they are models of futuristic glass apartments.

Joanna Manousis’ ‘Reaching an Ulterior Realm’ that presents us with what looks like helium mounted targets fired at by arrows (with varying degrees of success). The targets are not as fluid and the arrows not as light as we imagine however, as it becomes apparent they are made of solidified blown glass

Alongside the glass work is a newly commissioned film “Sing in Sand and Roar in Furnace Fire” to show how glassblowing is a controlled, balletic, and choreographed practice. The duet explains through interpretive dance the elements of trust, cooperation and synchronicity and how that is necessary for the production of glass art.


Urban Glass’s Glass Quarterly blog features more info on the show – click HERE.

For the “Breath-Taking” gallery guide pdf – click HERE.

"Material World" Exhibit Transcends Technique Vs Content

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Material World, an exhibition at artdc Gallery (March 12 to Sunday, April 3, 2011) focuses on artists who use non-traditional materials or tradition materials in non-standard ways to produce their work. “The commitment these artists have for their materials and craft lets their processes inform the content of the work, not overwhelm it,” notes curator Stephen Boocks. “While viewers will inevitably wonder how the works were made and will marvel at the technical prowess, the pieces selected ultimately transcend the materials used, allowing each finished object to stand on its own.”
Featuring works by Sherill Anne Gross, Michael Janis, J. T. Kirkland, Matthew Langley, Katherine Mann, and Marie Ringwald, Material World features exceptional work diverse in style and “serves as a testament to the rich pool of talented artists from or with close ties to the DC area,” adds Boocks. “These six artists at varying stages of their careers all have a clear vision of what they’re trying to achieve with their preferred media. ”

The core of this exhibition deals with artistic media - how it relates to the artist’s work and why the artist chose that medium to make their artwork. Does the material support the work or does it get in the way? Do all elements work in concert with each other to create a seamless whole? In art, as in most things, it all comes down to a delicate balance.

An opening reception will be held on Saturday, March 12 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Two artists talks will be held: Michael Janis and Marie Ringwald on Saturday, March 19, and Matt Langley on Saturday, April 2.
Gallery hours are Saturdays from 12 to 4 p.m. and by appointment.

Material World
artdc Gallery at The Lustine Center
5710 Baltimore Avenue
Hyattsville, Maryland 20781


About artdc Gallery: Located in the burgeoning Arts District in Hyattsville, Maryland, just outside of DC, the artdc Gallery features painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media, and more by metro DC artists. For more info visit artdc.com.

2011 ISGB Conference in Louisville

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The 2011 International Society of Glass Beadmakers (ISGB) Gathering will take place in Louisville, Kentucky from July 27th – July 31st. This year’s theme is “Diversity and Creativity: Cultural Influences in Glass Beadmaking”.


The ISGB Gathering will feature presentations, gallery tours, workshops and opportunities to network. Our torchworking superstar, Rob Kincheloe will be one of the presenters.

Click here to jump to the ISGB Registration Booklet PDF for a listing of the classes and presenters.

Hyperopia Projects’ Salon des Glass Refusés Launch Fundraiser

>Mentioned in an earlier blog posting, Hyperopia Projects is organizing a show of glass sculpture “Superpostion” in Seattle during the Glass Art Society Annual Conference to exhibit some of the most innovative and out-side mainstream glass and glass-related artwork. It will be held at the Center on Contemporary Art in June, 2011. The show’s jurors are Jack Wax, Jocelyne Prince, Jin Hongo and Michael Scheiner. Using the arts fundraising site of Kickstarter, the organization is seeking pledges to help get the show up and running. They have made a short video to help outline the purpose of the exhibition and how donations will be utilized.

Glass Sparks: Elizabeth Ryland Mears

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Elizabeth Ryland Mears is an amazing, award winning, studio glass artist that is a master with flameworked glass. Flameworking is a technique of working with hot glass. Rods or tubes of glass are held in the flame of a bench torch where the glass is softened and then shaped by sculpting and/or blowing. The forms created are limited only by the artist’s creativity and skill, in addition to gravity and the sizes of the bench torch and annealing kiln.

Elizabeth has studied and taught lampworking techniques at Penland School of Crafts, Pilchuck Glass School, The Studio of Corning Museum of Glass, and has been involved with the Washington Glass School for many years. Her instructional book of borosilicate glass techniques Flameworking, was published in 2003 by LARK Books.

The creative work of Elizabeth Mears incorporates several different series; each one relates to and informs the others. In her Artist Statement, Elizabeth informs the viewers of her work that she ”uses the lexicon of Nature images to portray her relationship to her inner and outer worlds”. Her “Bundle of Twigs” series clearly expresses this theme, as does her “Basket” series.

Elizabeth Mears Basket of Past Dreams and Future Fears
Each bundle represents some aspect of her inner world or the outer world, as she relates to it. Joseph Campbell in The Power of Myth with Bill Moyers also speaks of this relationship, “The seat of the soul is there where the inner and outer worlds meet”.

In her “Shelter” series the glass structure of the shelters serve as the protective shell for the work of her inner journey. Each shelter has a different theme.


Elizabeth Mears Shelter For Endings That Beget Beginnings

One such shelter created at a time of transition in Elizabeth’s creative life is entitled, “Shelter for Endings That Beget Beginnings”. The inner objects of this shelter are composed of hollow blown egg shapes which contain the charred remains of cedar wood shavings collected at Pilchuck Glass School from the 30th Anniversary Totem carved while she was at the summer session. The egg shapes can represent new life, and the charred remains, the death of the old life. Liz has commented that her time away at Pilchuck was instrumental in her personal transformation.

In 2002 Liz began a series, which started as a collaboration with her daughter L. Lindsey Mears, a maker of artist books and prints. Elizabeth created the glass sculpture, which later became “books” with her daugher providing the content through her photographs and poetry. Elizabeth is now the sole creator of the glass books, which contain the poetry that she writes. The photographic images chosen are symbols, which represent the experience of her poetry.


Elizabeth Mears Breath

A later series began after the death of Elizabeth’s mother in 2006. One day after that death Mears learned that her mother had been adopted as a newborn. She had never shared with any of her four children this secret she carried and no information exists about her birth family. Soon after this revelation, Liz learned many other family secrets, which prompted a continuing series of glass and mixed media pieces dealing with various aspects of the secrets we each consign to the dark recesses of our lives. In the process of making these pieces and contemplating secrets as a universal theme, Elizabeth looks at how the secrets of life often bind us together more than the parts of our lives which are shared openly. According to Campbell, “…the experience of eternity right here and now, in all things, whether thought of as good or as evil, is the function of life”.


Elizabeth Mears Secrets They Sprout Up and Burst

Liz felt a strong connection to the comment by Joseph Campbell, “If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. When you see that, you begin to meet people who are in the field of your bliss, and they open the doors to you”. She was struck by the similarity to a statement she has included in her own writings for many years.

In 2008, Mears was asked by LARK Books to be one of ten master artists to write a chapter for the book, The Penland Book of Glass. In her chapter, Elizabeth writes the following about her personal philosophy of living a creative life, “I am a proponent of the philosophy that when we are born, we come to Earth with a personality and a set of gifts, propensities, and abilities. If we pay attention to them, they lead us along a path to fulfillment. When those things we feel passionate about energize us, energy flows out and then returns to us, altered in some form by its journey. This energy creates a positive dynamic in all directions, reaching and influencing an ever enlarging circle”.

Through making her glass objects and meeting other makers and lovers of glass and sculpture, poetry and photography, the circle of energy continues to grow, and, as Campbell says, “doors will open where you didn’t know they were going to be”.


Elizabeth Mears and Robert Kinchloe review glass projects at Washington Glass School.

Elizabeth will be one of the featured artists at Longview Gallery ‘s exhibition in honor of Washington Glass School’s 10 year anniversary. Click HERE to jump to Elizabeth Mears website.