Therman Statom on PBS “Craft in America” Series- TEACHERS Episode

Artist Therman Statom is featured in the PBS series  "Craft In America"

Artist Therman Statom is featured in the PBS series “Craft In America”. The TEACHERS episode premiers Sept 15 on PBS

CRAFT IN AMERICA, the Peabody Award-winning series on PBS, explores America’s creative spirit through the language and traditions of the handmade, and taking the viewer to the artists, origins and techniques of American craft. Each episode contains stories from diverse regions and cultures, blending history with living practice and exploring issues of identity, ritual, philosophy and creative expression.


Glass artist Therman Statom is featured in the “Teachers” episode will premiere on PBS starting September 15 (*check local listings). This episode highlights renowned individuals who are committed to their own artistic visions and are equally committed to sharing their skills and passion for craft with new generations of students and artists of all ages. Have a look at the preview:

Special Glass Exhibit at 25th Washington Craft Show

>A highlight every fall, the 25th Annual Washington Craft Show comes to Washington, D.C.‘s Convention Center November 16-18.

Washington DC Convention Center

This premier showcase of contemporary craft in Americais nationally recognized for presenting masterful work, designed and made in artists’ studios across America. If you’re an avid collector, or you simply appreciate quality and beauty, this is your chance to view and purchase the latest works by nearly 200 of the nation’s top contemporary craft artists. Come meet the people who create the art and hear their stories of inspiration. All weekend there will be additional happenings to enjoy; special exhibitions, artist’s talks and fashion shows. Included with admission to the show:


In celebration of the 50th anniversary of studio art glass, the Washington Craft Show has provided the Maurine Littleton Gallery with an 800 square-foot space to illustrate the history of glass. The exhibit will feature work from Harvey K. Littleton, the founder of the American glass movement, and next generation artists Dale Chihuly, Fritz Dreisbach, Michael Janis, Allegra Marquart, Joel Myers, Ginny Ruffner, Therman Statom, Tim Tate, Erwin Timmers, Sean Hennessey and more. Maurine Littleton is the daughter of Harvey K. Littleton.

“A Life In Glass”



Book signings by art professor and author Joan Falconer Byrd: Harvey K. Littleton: A Life in Glass (Rizzoli, 2012). A member of Harvey Littleton’s first glassblowing class at the University of Wisconsin in 1962, Byrd is the author of numerous essays and articles on glass and ceramics.

On Saturday, Professor Byrd will sign copies of her book following a joint lecture with Maurine Littleton (start time 11a.m.). Book signings both days will take place in the Maurine Littleton Special Exhibit space.


Recipient of Golden Space Needle as the Audience Choice Award for Best Documentary, Seattle International Film Festival. Seattle artist Ginny Ruffner is best known for a pair of remarkable accomplishments: her well-regarded body of “lampworking” glass art and her miraculous, self-willed recovery from a near-fatal car crash that rendered her unable to walk or talk. These stories and dozens of others are illuminated from the inside in Karen Stanton’s moving and inspiring documentary.

FRIDAY, NOV. 16 – 5PM • SATURDAY, NOV.17 – 5PM • SUNDAY, NOV. 18 – 10 AM

“There’s more to Ruffner’s story than art, glorious as it is: “A Not So Still Life” is also an inspiring tale of rehabilitation and recovery.” ~ Moira MacDonald, Seattle Times. Run time 84 minutes.


Our Weekend Lecture Series provides unique opportunities for show visitors to hear from leaders in the field of Fine Craft. The lectures are educational, informative and interactive. This year’s lineup includes a gallery owner, author, museum curator, and an artist.


“Contemporary Textile Art – Past, Present, and Future”

Rebecca A.T. Stevens, Consulting Curator, Contemporary Textiles, The Textile Museum

Katy Clune, Communications Manager, The Textile Museum


“The Life and Work of Harvey K. Littleton”

Maureen Littleton and Joan Falconer Byrd: Moderator: Elizabeth Blair, senior producer NPR (Morning Edition, All Things Considered)

Sean Hennessey “That Worlds Unseen Surround the World We Know


Friday, November 16 • 10am-8pm

Saturday, November 17 • 10am-6pm

Sunday, November 18 • 11am-5pm (note: Screening of “A Not So Still Life” will begin at 10am in a room adjacent to the show floor. See box office attendant.)

Tickets $15 / seniors $14 / under 12 free with paid adult

Group discounts for 10 or more: $10 ea.

Friday after 6pm: $6

Washington Convention Center

801 Mt. Vernon Place NW

Washington, DC 20001

History Lesson – 2003

>The Washington Glass School celebrates its 10th year anniversary in 2011, archives and photos are being searched for the nuggets of history and indicators of the path we traveled.
We often work with the school systems and offer ways to have middle school students come to the Glass School for
free for an afternoon of creating cast glass tiles – a way to outreach to the schools and integrate their courses in math, science, physics, and art with a practical and hands-on application.

Tim Tate lectures the class from Stuart Hobsen, 2003.

Way back in 2003, the glass school was located in the District on Half Street, SE (the site is now part of the outfield of the Nationals baseball stadium). One of the schools that took us up on the offer was DC’s Stuart Hobson Middle School. Part of the educational section of the class was to review a quick history of studio glass art; with an emphasis on contemporary masters. One of the students mentioned during the art history lesson that his uncle sometimes paints on glass. (Tim Tate’s response: that’s great kid.)

Glass artist Therman Statom was discussed – as he grew up in Washington, DC, and that prompted the boys in the back into giggling fits. It turned out student was none other than Therman’s nephew, Jevon. He never knew that his uncle was considered to be a master of his craft.

Therman Statom

“Chair” Circa 1992

assembled glass sculpture with mixed media

53 X 48 X 32″

The class continued, with books and art magazines pulled out to show that every issue had an article or exhibition that featured Therman’s work. Jevon was taken aback at the celebrity factor of his uncle. Jevon later wrote a nice thank-you letter to the School:

Jevon Statom’s letter dated 11/19/03:
Dear Mr Tate & Staff
I want to thank you for letting my classmates
and I come to your shop. You taught me about glass.
I really appreciate you that you did all of this for free.
I am really excited that you acknowledged my uncle, Therman
Statom. I know that he was famous, but not that famous,
especially in DC. I really enjoyed the glass sculptures that
were on display, and how to find the tinted side of
glass. You have inspired me to try glass art for a while.
Therman’s nephew,
Jevon Statom

Tim Tate & Jevon Statom 2003

A nice footnote to the story – a few years later, we were able to repeat the story to Therman Statom when he taught at the Washington Glass School – as part of a James Renwick Alliance Distinguished Artist series in 2006.

Therman Statom teaching at Washington Glass School 2006