History Lesson – 2003

>The Washington Glass School celebrates its 10th year anniversary in 2011, archives and photos are being searched for the nuggets of history and indicators of the path we traveled.
We often work with the school systems and offer ways to have middle school students come to the Glass School for
free for an afternoon of creating cast glass tiles – a way to outreach to the schools and integrate their courses in math, science, physics, and art with a practical and hands-on application.

Tim Tate lectures the class from Stuart Hobsen, 2003.


Way back in 2003, the glass school was located in the District on Half Street, SE (the site is now part of the outfield of the Nationals baseball stadium). One of the schools that took us up on the offer was DC’s Stuart Hobson Middle School. Part of the educational section of the class was to review a quick history of studio glass art; with an emphasis on contemporary masters. One of the students mentioned during the art history lesson that his uncle sometimes paints on glass. (Tim Tate’s response: that’s great kid.)

Glass artist Therman Statom was discussed – as he grew up in Washington, DC, and that prompted the boys in the back into giggling fits. It turned out student was none other than Therman’s nephew, Jevon. He never knew that his uncle was considered to be a master of his craft.

Therman Statom

“Chair” Circa 1992

assembled glass sculpture with mixed media

53 X 48 X 32″

The class continued, with books and art magazines pulled out to show that every issue had an article or exhibition that featured Therman’s work. Jevon was taken aback at the celebrity factor of his uncle. Jevon later wrote a nice thank-you letter to the School:

Jevon Statom’s letter dated 11/19/03:
Dear Mr Tate & Staff
I want to thank you for letting my classmates
and I come to your shop. You taught me about glass.
I really appreciate you that you did all of this for free.
I am really excited that you acknowledged my uncle, Therman
Statom. I know that he was famous, but not that famous,
especially in DC. I really enjoyed the glass sculptures that
were on display, and how to find the tinted side of
glass. You have inspired me to try glass art for a while.
Sincerely
Therman’s nephew,
Jevon Statom

Tim Tate & Jevon Statom 2003

A nice footnote to the story – a few years later, we were able to repeat the story to Therman Statom when he taught at the Washington Glass School – as part of a James Renwick Alliance Distinguished Artist series in 2006.

Therman Statom teaching at Washington Glass School 2006

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