Maryland’s Salisbury University Visiting Artist Program

Salisbury University

Salisbury University

The Glass program at Salisbury University is now accepting applications for its Visiting Artist Program.
Application Deadline is May 15, 2015.

The Visiting Artist Program is a nine-month residency that invites a professional artist who works primarily with glass to be a vital part of the Glass Program at Salisbury University. resident artist will have full access to the glass facilities at SU to make a body of work in accordance with their research proposal, and with the opportunity to exhibit that work at the Salisbury University Gallery near the end of their residency period. 
In addition to making his or her own work, the chosen artist will also teach two beginner level glass courses per semester,* and work 10 hours a week as a studio technician. The teaching and studio technician load is a paid position. Classes are paid at $3,300 per academic course and $2,500 each semester for the studio technician, totaling $8,800 per semester.* All expenses, including housing, are the responsibility of the artist.
All applications must be submitted via email and include the following:
• Full CV, including contact information, education, and current position. MFA required.
• Residency project proposal
• Portfolio of 10-15 digital images of current work. The can be emailed, a link to your website or sent through Dropbox. No image should be larger than 2MB. If emailed, images can be sent in multiple emails. Image files should be labeled lastname_firstname_image number (1,2,3…)
• Corresponding Image list, with title, dimensions, materials and description. 
• Three Letters of Recommendation

Please send all application materials to:
Steven Durow, Assistant Professor
Head of Glass Program,
Salisbury University

*Subject to enrollment

Visiting Artists – Melissa Stern


NY- based artist Melissa Stern has been working recently in the glass school. Best know for her mixed media sculptures and drawings, Melissa has expanded her repertoire to include glass.

Melissa’s artwork is deceptive in its playful, childlike quality. Her highly imaginative (and frequently amusing) ceramic sculptures and drawings usually featuring human figures which call to mind sophisticated illustrations for children’s stories. Melissa sees her work removed from specific narrative and functioning instead in terms of psychology and metaphor. As much as we would like a ceramic standing figure–feet nailed to the floor, arms holding aloft a branch upon which large birds perch–to introduce a fascinating if disturbing fable, there is no story to explain it.

Summer in the South, collage, oil paint, pencil, 12 x 9

World View , clay, acrylic, paper, graphite, encaustic, 23″ x 5″ x 5″

Translating her drawn imagery with the use of glass frit powder, Melissa has really taken to the process, making it her own.

Melissa Stern’s fused glass frit components are assembled onto the glass panels she is creating.

Melissa and Tim Tate discuss the development of her panels.

Carving holes, tack-fusing texture, layering images – Melissa will ultimately add other non-glass elements to the glass panels she is creating.

We look forward to seeing the finished works by Melissa!
And congratulations, Melissa, on becoming an adjunct professor at Brooklyn College!