Printmaking with Glass


Making prints from Glass?! Instructor Kirk Waldroff has been teaching a class in making wood or lino block prints, translating that into glass, and pulling prints from the glass panels. This original process is created by expand on and combining traditional printmaking with modern glass sculpting techniques.

The glass positives inside the kiln – to be cleaned and inked.

Fresh from the kiln, the glass is carefully prepared as a relief matrix.

Kirk oversees the student Nancy Donnelly inking the block.

Some of the first prints pulled.

Instructor Kirk Waldroff expresses his happiness with the day’s results.

The class wraps up next week, with the students working on a more complex prints.

Hallo Deutsch Besucher!

Claudia Rousseau reviews Kirk Waldroff


Kirk Waldroff The Wrens and the Badger, Cast glass, poplar, and LED lighting

Art critic Claudia Rousseau reviews Kirk Waldroff’s impressive print-based mixed media sculpture solo show at the Glenview Mansion in this weekend’s DC Artnews blog.

Dr Rousseau writes:
“…Waldroff’s contribution to the Glenview exhibit include prints and wooden constructions that hold cast glass panels, that is, glass sculptures that have a print image on them—a technique that Waldroff will be teaching at the Washington Glass School on Saturday afternoons in April. They are created using a revolutionary kiln-casting process so that each is a unique reproduction of a carved woodblock (the kind originally created for wood-cut prints). These are set into wooden cabinets, or deep wooden boxes. There’s even a marvelous headboard with two inset glass panels topping a queen-sized bed right in the gallery.

Kirk Waldroff Unlocking Dreams – bed, maple, birch, cast glass, LED lighting

On the opposite wall are prints on paper from the same block that made the glass panels. Many of these glass/wood boxes are illuminated, but I imagine they would be effective set against a natural light source as well, or placed where they receive sun or lamplight. The warm light coming into the mansion gives them a nice glow. There are also a number of carved and painted wood panels presented as paintings rather than wood blocks. “

“… and the images are simple, but enough to stimulate the imagination. There are no right answers here. The viewer is encouraged to write them from his/her own trove of memories and ideas.”

Click HERE to jump to the entire review on DC Artnews.

Claudia Rousseau, Ph.D., teaches art history at Montgomery College, and writes regular critical reviews in local publications.

Kirk Waldroff “Untold Fables” through March 1, 2011
Glenview Mansion Art Gallery at Rockville Center Civic Center Park
602 Edmonston Drive
Rockville, MD 20851
Mon., Wed., Fri. 9 AM-4:30PM, Tues/Thurs, 9AM-9PM
240-314-8682 or 240-314-8660 for information or to confirm hours.

This April, Kirk will be teaching a class at the Washington Glass School that transfers wood block print imagery into cast glass. This amazing process is a great way for print-based artists to take their images over into other media. Click HERE to jump to Kirk’s class description.