Artists & Websites

>There is no denying that getting your creative work noticed online is HARD. Art galleries as they now exist, are the old fashioned way of selling art. The competition is vast and ever growing. Every day more and more artists add their artwork to the enormous selection of artwork already available online. How can one even begin to make a dent in that mountain of content and be noticed? Every artist needs their own website, and every artist needs to get their own website now. Every artist needs to become conscious of the new way people are viewing and experiencing art. There are literally billions of people out there who don’t know that you or your art exists. They associate your subject or medium with artists who show up on search engines. They don’t care about what gallery you may be associated with, they care about who shows up on the Web. If you don’t start showing up on the Web very soon, not only will no one know who you are, they won’t even care.

Susan Lomuto – the writer of Daily Art Muse research diva, an ex-non-profit executive director, a lover of contemporary fine craft has been working with artists and their careers for some time now. Susan had worked an internship here in the DC area’s Gateway Arts District this year to focus on defining how artists work and interact with each other and the community. Susan had just put out a new book and course that deals with artists and defining themselves online.

In Artist Online – a 12-week program, Susan walks you through the confusing maze of choices, answer your questions and teach you the basics using a combination of conference calls, screencast tutorials, handouts, forum posts, email and live online instruction.
Click HERE to read more about the course.

Susan’s also has a new book – The Cool, Calm & Collected Guide To A Better Artist Website: Tools and tips to help you create a website without raising your blood pressure or breaking the bank

Inside the book you will find:

  • Susan’s number one tip to make your website rock.
  • 8 steps to help you activate the tip.
  • More than 30 resources to help you create and maintain a professional website for your art and increase the efficiency of your business workflow.
  • Filled with beautiful images and quotes to inspire you on the journey, this guide will help you create a website while staying cool, calm and collected.

Click HERE to jump to info on the book.

Daily Art Muse Has Left The Building

>For the past two months, artist/writer Susan Lomuto of Daily Art Muse has been an apprentice for the Washington Glass School as well as three of the adjacent ceramic studios – Red Dirt Studio, Flux Studios and Ani Kasten Studio.

Susan Lomuto preps the kiln with Matthew Duffy.

Susan did the research apprenticeship as a way to gain insight into the lives of professional artists; hoping to see the how the artwork is made – the process – the success and strife – all from the perspective of the artist involved. Susan has (and will continue to) post some of the information on her blog Daily Art Muse. She also is planning on furthering the project into a book, and she wishes to create a full multi-media presentation (video, sound, photos, exhibitions) on the subject.

Susan photos Robert Kincheloe as he works on the torch.

Leaning how to make a good weld with Erwin Timmers. Salvaging glass for use in a recycled glass public art project.

This week marks the end of Susan’s DC apprenticeship – and she has posted about her farewell. Hugs all around – an we look forward to DaMuse’s writing and postings!

Click HERE to see her farewell posting (with animated photo).

(While sad to see her go – Susan hopes to return for a residency at Flux Studio this coming fall.)

Daily Art Muse’s Susan Lomuto Is Here to Work!

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Susan Lomuto, a Connecticut based artist / writer, established a blog called “The Daily Art Muse” (DAM), showcasing contemporary fine craft.

DAM covers the global landscape of handcrafted artwork with thousands of readers of her weekday posts and content in over 3,000 archived posts. Susan created the site to inspire “artists, designers and collectors worldwide” and the website is frequently used as an educational resource in traditional classroom settings (high school and college) as well as online learning environments.
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As
part of exploring what it takes to be dedicated to art and fine craft, Susan has set out to work as an apprentice for a number of artists across the country. She wants to learn – about art and about the life of an artist; ultimately writing in-depth about the working artist’s life. Many of her experiences will be featured in the Daily Art Muse blog. Susan is working at creating a multimedia experience complete with pictures, video and text.

The apprenticeship project continues this coming week, as she begins a 6-week internship with several DC area artists – including the Washington Glass School.

Said Susan of the process: I suppose I could have just planned a road trip to visit artists around the country, asking questions, taking lots of pictures, shooting video – but that felt incomplete. Instead, I wanted to develop a solid understanding of the how/why/when/what that makes this a well-lived life, so I am getting my hands dirty as an intern – in many cases jumping out of my comfort zone and into their studios, working in mediums unknown to these hands (like glass), sweeping floors, conditioning clay, gathering supplies – and whatever else they need me to do.”

How Washington Glass School welcomes Susan Lomuto.

“My first internship, with jewelry artist Dina Varano in Connecticut, was a quiet one, working in a studio nestled in the woods, away from the distractions of the outside world.
The DC internship promises to be a lively experience in an arts complex that is home to several busy studios and more than two dozen artists. I will make sure I’m ready for the
“Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore” moment once I get there!”

Read more of Susan’s travels and internship – click HERE.

For an update on Susan’s kick-off mtg with the studios – Click HERE


To help fund the arts endeavor, Susan has created a great fundraising project, complete with perks for donations. Click HERE to learn more about perks.

Daily Art Muse on Washington Glass School

>Susan Lomuto of the Daily Art Muse Blog writes about her first take on the Washington Glass School. To get an insider’s knowledge of how a glass studio and school runs, Susan will be interning at the Glass School, and she will be writing of her experiences in her blog.

Erwin Timmers checking on work in the kiln. Photo by Susan Lomuto.


From Susan’s blog:

There are many stories at Washington Glass Studio – stories of deep roots and new growth; of illness and family; of building the kind of community you want to live in; of healing and living large with love, hard work, humor, friendship and kindness. I am eager to return and share this vibrant community of artists with you – I promise you will be inspired.

Click HERE to jump to Daily Art Muse blog.

Daily Art Muse Blog On Artists of Gateway Arts District

>The author of the Daily Art Muse blog; Susan Lomuto writes about some of the DC area artists and studios involved in her upcoming internship. Susan is planning on writing about her experience working with different artists within various media.

Tim Tate and Laurel Lukaszweski share a laugh in Novie Trump’s studio

Says Susan of her initial visit to the studios:

“There is a gem tucked away in Mt. Rainier, MD, just a block away from Washington DC – a nondescript, unassuming building where art thrives, relationships flourish, learning is encouraged and life is enriched.
I was only with each of these artists a short time, but it was long enough to understand that they are cultivating an atmosphere of caring, support, friendship, community, humor and learning that helps them create magnificent art and shape extraordinary individuals. I can’t wait to be a part of it and share what I learn with you”


For the full blog posting – click HERE.

Daily Art Muse on Elizabeth Ryland Mears

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Large Bundle of Twigs with Knitted Copper Wrap Detail

Glass, Flameworked, Sandblasted, Waxed Linen, Lusters, Copper, Steel
6″h x 26″w x 5″d

The Daily Art Muse blog most recent posting focuses on our own flameworker extraordinaire Elizabeth Mears.
Says Susan Lomuto about Liz’ work “When I found Elizabeth Ryland Mears’ flameworked glass twig bundles and sculptures they resonated with a place deep inside. And so timely, my discovery of Mears’ work. For the last two weeks I have been gathering and collecting bits and pieces of tree branches, bark, pebbles – thinking about how these fragments are as beautiful as the whole. . .”

The Great Wandering

The blog article continues with some of the collaborative work that Liz creates with her daughter L Lindsey Mears. Lindsey is an an artist in her own right creating art books, prints, and assemblages.

Click HERE to jump to the Daily Art Muse blog posting.