In Memoriam: Boyce Lundstrom 1944 – 2012

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Ray Ahlgren, Dan Schwoerer, Boyce Lundstrom

Boyce Lundstrom, a true iconic legend in glass fusing history,  passed away this week of brain cancer. This is a huge loss to the fusing world. Boyce was an innovator, author and glass craftsman and a founding member of modern fusing.  He had written many books on glass – his book “Kiln Firing Glass, Glass Fusing Book One” is referred to by many fusers as the “bible” for fusing process. In 1974, three self-described “hippie glassblowers” (Dan Schwoerer and Ray Ahlgren and Boyce Lundstrom) started the Bullseye Glass Company. Boyce later sold his interest in that company to his partner in 1985, then created a glass school called Camp Colton, outside of Portland, Oregon.

Boyce at the Fusing Ranch

In 2004, Boyce said of his work in the late 1970′s as he was developing the technology and practice of fused glass: “My enthusiasm for fusing demanded endless experimentation and my endeavors soon caught the attention of a number of glass artists who became, along with me, pioneers of a sort. Our work, our workshop, and the push to spread the word about glass fusing somehow became known as the Fusing Ranch.”

In recent years Boyce has continued to experiment with new and rewarding ways to play with glass. He has published three new books (2010-2012), each covering one area of exploration and providing several projects to assist the reader in undertaking a new method or material.

He also taught classes as a guest teacher in studios across America and hosted seminars in his Oceanside, California studio.

In his passing, we celebrate the craftsman, pioneer, educator, scientist, artist, man. 

Finding Tin (Side) – A How To Guide

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Boyce Lundstrom – one of the co-founders of the Bullseye Glass company and fused glass leader – answers questions about vexing glass fusing issues on his website. Recently he posted on other ways to detect the tin side of float glass. As glass fusers know, the tin side of float is contaminated with tin during the float glass making process, and locating the tin side is useful for the artisan.

Boyce writes:

“The most accepted way to tell which side was floating on the tin is to use a short wave black light. A small device often referred to as a Tin Scope is available and costs approximately $55. When the black light is placed against the glass, the tin side will appear cloudy. (Mark that side with a permanent marker.)”

M L Duffy checks for tin side as he creates the cast glass for Safeway supermaket’s Bethesda public artwork.
“Another way to test is with cutting and firing. First mark one side of your glass with a line made with a permanent marker. Cut off a strip of the glass that has the marker line and fire the strip to 1450º. The tin side will not devit or haze. The side without the tin will haze, or get a satin finish. Match up your tests and mark the larger glass as to the tin side for later identification. The cost will be about $.50 for the firing in any 120 volt kiln.”

“This feels like float…”
Boyce continued - “I recently tried a third method of discerning the tin side of Float glass with my students at a workshop in Kansas City. I explained how Float glass was made, and then I asked them to identify the tin side by using only the sense of touch. They were encouraged to feel the two previously cleaned sides of the Float glass with their fingers and discern a slight difference in the surface texture. Without further instruction or explanation, every one of the students was able to tell me which side of their glass sample had the tin finish. One side was smooth but the other side is “smoother.” The less smooth side is the tin side. The cost is “0.” Trust yourself!”


Interesting premise – I have not tried it yet. I am sure that I will feel the cut side of the float glass.

Ow.
Click HERE to jump to Boyce Lundstrom’s Q & A section of his website.