Allegra Marquart “If Only” Exhibit at Tennessee’s Appalachian Center For Craft

Tennessee’s Appalachian Center for Craft has opened an exhibit of works by glass artist Allegra Marquart titled “If Only…”, from Jan 15 – April 2, 2020.allegra.marquart.glass

The wonderful, whimsical, inventive new works combine cast glass and thread drawings, each piece tells a unique “If Only…”) story and invites the viewer in to a fantasy world. The works on exhibit are part of a series called “If Only…..”. Some are from old fables and some are from stories Allegra has written herself. The center will be having a reception for the artist on Thursday April 2, 2020.

Allegra Marquart; “The Cat Who Wanted To Be A Woman”, 24x40", Cast, cut painted glass shapes wall mounted through machine stitched background of multiple colored threads.

Allegra Marquart; “The Cat Who Wanted To Be A Woman”, 24×40″, Cast, cut painted glass shapes wall mounted through machine stitched background of multiple colored threads.

Said Allegra about her unique cast glass-and-thread installation works:

“I kept imagining the glass animals that peopled my stories moving across wider swathes of wall space; going about their people-like business in a light-hearted way. By kiln forming larger shapes and cutting away the excess glass each figure could become free floating thanks to the discovery of a wall mounting system that was pretty much invisible and allowed compositional flexibility and some depth. The figures could now appear to float a little off the wall.

Texture and color were advanced by developing background panels made of loosely woven thread and appliqué.  The sewn panels added to the narrative and also gave a contrasting fragility to the glass shapes that hovered above it. Now it was possible to make larger pieces without the complication of weight.

Allegra Marquart "If Only I Had Red Wings"; 2019, Cast, cut and painted glass shapes mounted above panel of sewn thread and appliqué, 22"x30"

Allegra Marquart “If Only I Had Red Wings”; 2019, Cast, cut and painted glass shapes mounted above panel of sewn thread and appliqué, 22″x30″

All technical steps would mean nothing to me if at the end I could not communicate a sense of thoughtful joy that feeds off absurd and fascinating situations swirling around us everyday. That’s what fables, songs and stories are about. They address the human condition with humor, invention and exaggeration.

Interpreting a fable through glass means that the very medium holds metaphors relating to the conditions of life. The stuff can take so many forms. It holds light, it breaks, it’s strong, it’s delicate, it’s entrancing, expressive, it’s not easy to make it the way I want it to be.”

The Appalachian Center for Craft is a campus of Tennessee Tech University’s School of Art, Craft & Design (1 hour from Nashville, TN). The Center for Craft promotes excellence in American craft by teaching tradition and innovation in technique, concept and design, providing access to the highest quality craft education, professional artists, and career opportunities.

Jan 15 – April 2, 2020

Allegra Marquart, “If Only

Reception: April 2, 2020 4:30-6:30 p.m.

The Appalachian Center for Craft
1560 Craft Center Dr.
Smithville, TN. 37166

Congrats Deb Ruzinsky – New Director of Appalachian Center for Craft!

The Appalachian Center for Craft is a satellite campus of Tennessee Tech.

The Appalachian Center for Craft is a satellite campus of Tennessee Tech.

The Appalachian Center for Craft (ACC) has announced that their new Director of the Appalachian Center for Craft at Tennessee Tech University is our Debra Ruzinsky! Congratulations Debra - and congrats to the school who is getting such a thoughtful and dedicated new director! This will be great for both of them!

Deborah Ruzinsky lectures on glass casting techniques at Washington Glass School.

Debra Ruzinsky lectures on glass casting techniques at Washington Glass School.

 

The Appalachian Center for Craft is located on over 500 wooded acres overlooking Center Hill Lake in scenic Middle Tennessee near the town of Smithville. The facility was built in 1979 and exceeds 87,000 square feet of spacious studios, gallery, exhibitions, administrative offices, library, cafe, student housing and meeting/audio visual rooms.

The Craft Center is approximately 60 miles east of Nashville and 120 miles west of Knoxville; and only 25 miles west of TTU’s main campus in Cookeville.

Debra Ruzinsky is a creative facilitator, an arts administrator, and an active and engaged glass artist with an ongoing practice. Her works are found in numerous collections, among them the Seto City Museum collection in Seto, Japan, and the Glasmeseet Ebeltoft collection in Denmark. She has exhibited at such venues as Vis Arts in Rockville, MD, Urban Glass in Brooklyn, NY, Hawk Galleries exhibition BIGG: Breakthrough Ideas in Global Glass in Columbus, OH, The Wayne Art Center exhibition Reflections in Glass in Pennsylvania, the Brattleboro Museum of Art exhibition Glass in All Senses in Vermont, and the Glass Heap Challenge exhibition at the Glass Factory Museum in Boda Glasbruk, Sweden.