BECon 2011


This coming June, Bullseye Glass hosts their glass arts conference in Portland, OR. The biennial conference is a great way to see the latest BE glass products, tour the factory and network with other glass artists and educators. Scholarships are available – read below:

BECon 2011

CROSSOVER: A Material Exchange
Exploring the interface between kiln-glass and other media

What can the “makers” in the field of kiln-glass learn from artists working in other media? What lies at the interface of kiln-glass and forms of expression like painting, architecture, photography, digital technologies, printmaking and textiles? Exploring such questions is precisely the goal of the Bullseye Conference, 2011.

Every two years, aspiring and accomplished kiln-glass professionals from around the globe enjoy the opportunity to gather, network, compare notes and expand their horizons. That opportunity is known as BECon (the Bullseye Conference).

June 16-18, 2011.

Portland, Oregon, USA—on the metropolitan campus of Portland State University, which is central to the city’s vibrant, arts-rich core.

A partial list of presenters includes:
Elizabeth Aro Invorio, Italy
Steve Brown London, England
Bruce Guenther Portland, Oregon, United States
Alex Hirsch Portland, Oregon, United States
Alex Hoare Winchester, England
Munson Hunt Santa Fe, New Mexico, United States
Tom Jacobs Portland, Oregon, United States
Silvia Levenson Lesa, Italy
Dante Marioni Seattle, Washington, United States
Richard Parrish Bozeman, Montana, United States
Marc Petrovic Essex, Connecticut, United States
Laurel Porcari New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Rick Potestio Portland, Oregon, United States
Judith Schaechter Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Shapeways Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Karlyn Sutherland Lybster, Scotland
Lino Tagliapietra Venice, Italy
Karen Yair Birmingham, England

About 250 artists, designers, fabricators, instructors, and students from around the globe.

Are in the planning stages. Update – click HERE to jump to BE workshops.

Bullseye is offering 25 scholarships for students. Recipients can attend the conference for $250, less than half the standard price. To qualify, you must currently be enrolled full time in an accredited university or have graduated from an accredited university no earlier than May 2010.

To apply for a scholarship, please email the following information to by February 13, 2011:
1) your contact information, including name, website (if applicable), mailing address, and email address
2) your CV or résumé
3) a short paragraph describing how you will use what you learn at BECon 2011
4) four to six .jpg files showing your work (no file larger than 100 kb.)
5) a list identifying each work shown in the .jpg files by title of image, title of work, year, technique/media, dimensions, and photographer.

Scholarship recipients will be notified by email no later than February 27, 2011. Once notified, recipients will be able to register for the conference at the reduced rate of $250.

Will open early in 2011.

Contact for more information.
Click here and here to learn about Portland, Oregon.

Foundry Gallery Awards

>Foundry Gallery opened the Celebrate Gay Marriage show this past weekend – with a packed gallery and serenade of love songs performed by the Gay Men’s Chorus ‘Potomac Fever’ a capella group.
Awards for the artwork were given on Friday with awards to Stephen Honicki, Tom Hill, Susan Singer and first place award to Washington Glass School’s Michael Janis – congrats & well done all!

Still to come:
Special Free Event: Saturday, January 15, 2011, 4 pm
Well-known art historian Dr. Jonathan Katz was co-curator of the “Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. The lecture is free to the public, but admittance will be on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The Foundry Gallery

1314 18th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036

Alison Sigethy Solo Show @ The Art League Gallery


Eco-artist Alison Sigethy’s solo artist exhibit Understory, January 6 – February 7, 2011 will be featured in The Art League Gallery at the Torpedo Factory Art Center on Alexandria’s Potomac River waterfront.

Alison Sigethy draws inspiration from the natural world surrounding her – from her works made from natural fibers to sculptures made from recycled glass. Her multimedia solo exhibit, Understory, will be featured in The Art League Gallery, January 6 – February 7, 2011.

With this collection of works, Sigethy is creating an installation that invites the viewer to explore the often unnoticed, yet essential parts of the forest. She emphasizes the “quiet beauty” of the unseen through layers of glass fungi, collages that evoke the striations of cliff sides, and delicate snowflakes.

Alison works almost exclusively with recycled materials; the majority of her glass comes from the lenses of solar collectors. Dead tree trunks and driftwood collected on her kayaking sojourns are used as anchors for delicate crystalline elements. The use of these salvaged materials reinforces a pervasive theme in Alison’s work: we, as a culture, generate too much waste. How can we reuse “trash” to create something beautiful? After leaving the world of marketing and print production to pursue both art and kayaking, Sigethy was drawn to glass for its various hues and effect on light.

A trip to Greenland in 2006 inspired her to work with recycled materials to create her environmentally conscious work.

One of the Washington Glass School’s instructors, Alison was named Torpedo Factory “Artist of the Year” in 2010.


The Art League Gallery , Room 21

The Torpedo Factory Art Center

105 N. Union St.

Alexandria, VA 22314

Exhibit Dates: January 6 – February 7

Opening Reception:Thursday, January 13th (special performance by Karen Reedy Dance) 6:30-8pm

Artist Talk: 7:00 pm on Thursday, January 20th

Afternoon performance by storyteller Laura J. Bobrow at 1:00 on Sunday, January 23rd

Judith Schaechter Creativity Workshop


The Sin Eater Glass 25 x 46 x 6 inches

As part of the James Renwick Alliance Distinguished Artist Series, Judith Schaechter will teach a Creativity Workshop on May 21, 2011. Designed to help artists explore ways to break through “artists block” and expand their creative practice, participants will engage in group discussions as well as individual exercises. On Sunday, May 22, Judith Schaechter will present a lecture on her work in the Grand Salon at the Renwick Gallery. The lecture will be free and open to the public.

Lockdown Glass 21 x 31 x 6 inches

Judith Schaechter, renowned stained glass artist, is the recipient of many grants, including the Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships in Crafts, The Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, The Joan Mitchell Award, the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and a Leeway Foundation grant. Her work is in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Corning Museum of Glass, The Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick and numerous other collections. Judith’s work was included in the 2002 Whitney Biennial, and she is a 2008 USA Artists Rockefeller Fellow.

The Minotaur (detail) Glass 38 x 25 x 6 inches

Workshop Description:
Creativity is mysterious, miraculous and utterly crucial to an artists’ practice. Because Judith Schaechter herself experienced some difficult bouts of artist’ block, she did a great deal of research into this fascinating and elusive subject. How does one become inspired? How does one choose the one idea to pursue amongst many ideas? Are there techniques to improve oneself creatively?

Ultimately, Judith divided creativity into the following: Inspiration, Perspiration (developing ideas into pieces), Practice (work habits, motivation), Audience and Beliefs.
This workshop will begin with a questionnaire, which should identify areas of interest to the participants. Judith will then share a presentation on what she has discovered. Lively group discussions and individual exercises will follow.

Distinguished Artist Series workshops are $30 for members, $40 for non members. The subscription cost for all four programs is $100 for JRA members and $140 for non-members.
For more information or to register for any of these programs please e-mail:

Call for Sculptural Glass Entries

>HYPEROPIA PROJECTS has sent out a call for entries for a juried show called Superposition that challenges traditional notions of glass artwork.

Made up of a group of practicing artists with backgrounds in glass art (Helen Lee, Alexander Rosenberg and Matthew Szösz ), Hyperopia Projects focuses on artwork that is outside the traditional glass world, drawing simultaneously from the glass, sculpture and/or new media disciplines – hovering in a “state of superposition, between disciplines and media, with infinite possibility and little actual opportunity — i.e., the discomfort of glass” They are seeking “to support a longer view of where glass is headed — where the identity of glass may be intermingled with the larger world of contemporary art.”Call For Entries:

{SUPERPOSITION} will be a juried show of sculptural glass and glass related sculpture to be held at the Center on Contemporary Art, Seattle WA in June, 2011 concurrent with the Glass Art Society Conference. They are now accepting submissions.

“We are looking for artists whose works inhabit so many places simultaneously that they might not fit into any of them. We are interested in works that directly address this condition of being in multiple places at once, as well as projects produced by artists who inhabit the fringes of genres.

The conventional work and commerce associated with glass is limited in scope, exhibition space, and growth. There is a general lack of awareness in greater contemporary practice of the fertile growth and development of glass as a sculptural medium in recent years.

Material-based artists offer a bridging ground, coming out of the material and physical understanding of their traditions and exploring the conceptual territory offered by contemporary practice, often creating their own definitions of what they are doing. Likewise, non-glass artists approach material and the issues surrounding glass from fresh and intriguing perspectives, mapping areas outside conventional glass practice, but linked to the whole.”

WHEN – June 2011, in conjunction with the Glass Art Society Conference

WHERE – Center on Contemporary Art, Seattle Washington.

JURORS – Jin Hongo, Jocelyne Prince, Michael Scheiner, Jack Wax

APPLICATION DEADLINE – February 11th, 2011

For more information about the exhibition, please visit

Glass Fun Facts – Shattered Glass Can Help Predict the Weather


“Tut-tut, it looks like rain.
Yeah, and I’m a little black rain cloud.

Clues to future climate may be found in the way glass shatters.

Results of a study published this past week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences find that microscopic particles of dust can break apart in patterns that are similar to the fragment patterns of broken glass and other brittle objects.

The research, by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientist Jasper Kok, suggests there are several times more dust particles pumped into the atmosphere than previously believed, since shattered dust appears to produce an unexpectedly high number of large fragments.The finding has implications for understanding future climate change because dust plays a significant role in controlling the amount of solar energy in the atmosphere.

Depending on their size and other characteristics, some dust particles reflect solar energy and cool the planet, while others trap energy as heat. “As small as they are, conglomerates of dust particles in soils behave the same way on impact as a glass dropped on a kitchen floor,” Kok says. “Knowing this pattern can help us put together a clearer picture of what our future climate will look like.”

The study may also improve the accuracy of weather forecasting, especially in dust-prone regions. Dust particles affect clouds and precipitation, as well as temperature. “This research provides valuable new information on the nature and distribution of dust aerosols in the atmosphere,” says Sarah Ruth, program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences, which funds NCAR. “The results may lead to improvements in our ability to model and predict both weather and climate.”

Physicists have long known that certain brittle objects, such as glass, rocks, or even atomic nuclei, fracture in predictable patterns. The resulting fragments follow a certain range of sizes, with a predictable distribution of small, medium, and large pieces.

Scientists refer to this type of pattern as scale invariance or self-similarity. Physicists have devised mathematical formulas for the process by which cracks propagate in predictable ways as a brittle object breaks.

Kok theorized that it would be possible to use these formulas to estimate the range of dust particle sizes. By applying the formulas for fracture patterns of brittle objects to soil measurements, Kok determined the size distribution of emitted dust particles.

To his surprise, the formulas described measurements of dust particle sizes almost exactly.

“The idea that all these objects shatter in the same way is a beautiful thing, actually,” Kok says. “It’s nature’s way of creating order in chaos.”

Shattered glass = beautiful thing. Glass artists might disagree.

Click HERE to jump to complete article in the National Science Foundation News.

Other WGS : Glass Fun Facts

Glass Fun Facts: Gaffer/Composer

More Glass Fun Facts: Bullseye Glass

Float Glass Fun Facts

Why is Glass Transparent?

Historical Glass Fun Facts – How the Invention of Pyrex and The Studio Glass Movement are Connected.

New Work by Erwin Timmers


Self-Scrutiny by Erwin Timmers
24″ x 40″ x 8″ cast recycled glass, steel

photos by

detail showing interconnection of cast glass rods and knots

“Self-Scrutiny” is a new wall-mounted artwork by Erwin Timmers made from cast recycled glass and steel pipe. Erwin casts recycled glass into twisted tube-like shapes that he joins and creates forms with steel connectors. On the wall they form a maze that creates positive and negative spaces while highlighting the complex qualities of recycled glass.

detail showing depth of work

Glass for the piece is recycled – sourced from windows, household vases, and bottles. Unlike the glass made specifically for craft and art use, industrial glass is difficult to re-melt. Erwin has developed new techniques to exploit the characteristics of this material.

Erwin writes of his work: “My work references environmental issues of concern to me – primarily I see my artistic process as being involved with the process of recycling to create art…”

“I choose to recycle or reinterpret not only for reflection on environmental issues, but also for fun, play, and ultimately art. My work showcases the possibility and beauty of recycled material, while encouraging the viewer to consider their environmental impact.”

Erwin feels that one of the artist’s most important roles is to reveal the hidden value inherent within a particular object. His work encourages a re-examination of objects around us. By framing the object in a new way, one is challenged to rethink the value of everyday objects and one is encouraged to find aesthetic pleasure from what might seem to be the most mundane and ordinary of things.

In today’s society, the philosophy exists that once something has fulfilled its use, we should throw it away rather than try to find another use for it. Yet, finding new uses for discarded objects is one way to breathe life back into the objects around us. To see art where others see trash is one thing, but to lead others to see that art for themselves is what artists have been engaged in since the turn of the century.

Click HERE to jump to Erwin’s website.