Glass and Steel Sculpture Development Class Working Flat Out

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The sculpture development class held at both the Washington Glass School and DC Glass Works is working hard at completing their mixed-media sculptures.


Erin Antognoli sizes and fits her fused elements into her steel framework.


Lee Ann Taylor’s artwork.


Raya Koren marks the spacing for her glass & cast aluminum elements.


Tracy Benson’s cast ants cut around her cast glass leaves.


Brenda Dean shaping small elements.


Matthew Graham’s sculpture will feature delicate glass insect wings.


Joanna Viudiz assembles her cast glass elements into her steel framework.

Faz Besharatian working on the chop saw so fast, he becomes a blur.

The class is finishing up the works for a grand unveiling – stay tuned for photos of the finished works! The finished works will be part of the Washington Glass Studio’s Holiday Open House, Saturday, December 11, from 2-6 pm.

Glass Sparks: Teddie Hathaway

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Teddie Hathaway

As part of the Washington Glass School’s upcoming 10 year anniversary, the WGS Blog will have a series of stories – “Glass Sparks” – stories and profiles of the school and its artists. The first artist we will feature is Teddie Hathaway.

Teddie’s career as an artist traces her transition from a distinctly DC career path. Teddie had worked in and for the offices of Members of Congress, most recently as the finance administrator for seven different members handling the strategic budgeting for their official activities and the execution and monitoring of those budgets.

As a way of finding a new career path, she took inventory of her own skills and interests and plotted out her options to make sure she used the opportunity presented by retirement. Teddie took numerous classes – at the Washington Glass School and at other glass education centers and studios – affording her explore to as many approaches and techniques as possible in her newfound medium – glass. Focusing on recycled glass, which she sometimes removes from old window frames and collects from demolition sites, Teddie works at changing industrial components into things of beauty that speak to her of form, rhythm, texture and heft.

Teddie working hot glass at DC Glass Works Studio

Teddie exhibited recently in a juried show in Sequim, Washington, as part of an international glass festival. Teddie also has work in a group exhibit here in the DMV area, as the Weisser Glass Gallery’s show: “Excavate – Unearthing The Artist” which opens this Sunday, Nov 21st.

EXCAVATE – Unearthing The Artist

November 21st – December 12th

Weisser Gallery, 4080-B Howard Ave, Kensington, MD 20895

Nancy Donnelly Solo Show at Foundry Gallery

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Nancy Donnelly’s new sculptures are kiln‐cast glass, frequently augmented with paint and metals in a very contemporary palette. With a background in painting and anthropology, tone of the Washington Glass School’s studio artist is focused on gesture and movement. From glass birds swooping overhead to 4‐legged work nearly walking off the pedestal, these unique pieces express character and attitude.

F o u n d r y G a l l e r y

1314 18th Street NW, 1st Floor, Washington, DC 20036

Nancy Donnelly

Situations Made Visible

Exhibit Dates: December 1 — January 2

Reception: Friday, December 3, 6—8 pm

Artist talk: Sunday, December 12, 2-4 pm

Hours: Wednesday‐Friday, 1‐7 pm & Saturday‐Sunday, 12‐6 pm

From Foundry Gallery’s website:

Nancy Donnelly’s glass sculptures all in one way or another address issues of what it is like to be female, in this world, and living now. Clothed or nude, male or female, even pieces that don’t show a human being at all, they all express the situation of having a certain age, a certain gender, a certain stance and attitude. Wall labels will help explain matters, both in cartoons and in words.

The pieces in this show are made of glass, kiln-cast into plaster molds at around 1600 degrees, and then altered usually with paint and metals to clarify what Nancy sees as the most important visual elements. Some of them turned out to be surprising even to Nancy as she made them.

Nancy Donnelly moved to glass in 2006 after painting for about 10 years. Trained in oils, she has learned glass work at Washington Glass School, Pratt Fine Arts Center (Seattle), Bullseye Connection (Portland, Oregon), amongst other places. She is a studio artist at Washington Glass School, and shows at City Gallery and Capitol Hill Art League as well as Foundry. Her awards include a 2008 Artist Fellowship from the DC Commission on Arts and Humanities. Nancy’s work is in the collection of the Shakespeare Theater and in private collections.

Click HERE to jump to Nancy’s website.

Washington Craft Show Panel Discussion

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As part of the Washington Craft Show, being held at the DC Convention Center November 19 – 21, 2010, Kelly Conway, the Chrysler Museum’s Curator of Glass, will be moderating a panel discussion titled “Fresh Perspectives and Paths in Glass“.

Join sculptors Matthew Fine, Charles Savoie and Tim Tate as they discuss topics that include: how they work to break the traditional rules and perceptions; how process informs their work; collaboration vs. solitary work; finding personal narrative expressed through their work and much more.

Fresh Perspectives and Paths in Glass

Friday, November 19, 2010 1:00 PM

Washington Convention Center
The lecture room is 204A – just around the corner from the Exhibition Hall.

At the Washington Craft Show, over 190 of the nation’s top craft artists will showcase new ways to consider objects for daily or special use, home décor, or what-to-wear—from hard-edged metals, silken ceramics and lustrous woods to ultra craft couture.

Click HERE to jump to the Craft Show Website.

Michael Janis in California

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Michael Janis discussing his work.

WGS’ Michael Janis will be jetting off to sunny California to teach at the Bay Area Glass Institute (BAGI). Michael received the 2010 Saxe Fellowship for his work in glass, and he will be teaching bas relief casting and imagery in glass workshops. Click HERE to jump to BAGI’s workshop listing on its website.

The Bay Area Glass Institute is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit Art Education facility founded in 1996 to make glass art accessible to all and provide continued artistic and educational growth to artists, patrons and the community. BAGI is funded in part by the City of San Jose’s Office of Cultural Affairs and the Arts Council Silicon Valley.

Daily Art Muse on Washington Glass School

>Susan Lomuto of the Daily Art Muse Blog writes about her first take on the Washington Glass School. To get an insider’s knowledge of how a glass studio and school runs, Susan will be interning at the Glass School, and she will be writing of her experiences in her blog.

Erwin Timmers checking on work in the kiln. Photo by Susan Lomuto.


From Susan’s blog:

There are many stories at Washington Glass Studio – stories of deep roots and new growth; of illness and family; of building the kind of community you want to live in; of healing and living large with love, hard work, humor, friendship and kindness. I am eager to return and share this vibrant community of artists with you – I promise you will be inspired.

Click HERE to jump to Daily Art Muse blog.

Chicago’s Art Institute Re-Opens Chagall "Windows"

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Emily Heye, associate conservator of objects, uncovers the restored Chagall stained glass windows at their new location in the Art Institute Wednesday. The windows, which were removed five years ago for the construction of the Modern Wing, will open to the public on Nov. 1. (Michael Tercha/Chicago Tribune)

After five years out of sight, one of the Art Institute of Chicago’s most popular works is back.

Artist Marc Chagall’s “America Windows,” dismantled in 2005 for safe keeping during the lengthy, construction of the Art Institute of Chicago’s new Modern Wing, reopens to the public Monday.

Chagall created the stained glass panel wall as a result of the city’s and the Art Institute’s response and support for his mosaic “Four Seasons.” He presented the work to the museum in 1977 and dedicated it to Mayor Richard J. Daley for supporting public art.

The artist called his piece America Windows to recogize a country on its bicentennial that valued and supported the arts.

Bueller…Bueller?

The glass wall was also featured in the classic John Hughes film “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off“.

After nearly 30 years on view overlooking the Art Institute’s McKinlock Court, the glass windows, subject to slight condensation, had attracted atmospheric deposits of oil and calcium carbonate, which appeared as a sheer white film dulling their filtered, colored light, muting the brilliance of colors. Seizing on the opportunity provided by the 36-paneled windows’ removal during the lengthy construction, the museum’s conservation staff investigated various methods of cleaning, and, beginning about two years ago, the restorative work began.

Detail of one of the Chagall windows.

Associate Conservator Emily Heye commented: “Imagine large Q-tips and lots of time spent carefully rinsing after the fact.” Simultaneous to Heye’s immaculate restorative work, a new exhibition space was designed and constructed for the windows in the east end of the museum’s Arthur Rubloff building.

Daily Art Muse Blog On Artists of Gateway Arts District

>The author of the Daily Art Muse blog; Susan Lomuto writes about some of the DC area artists and studios involved in her upcoming internship. Susan is planning on writing about her experience working with different artists within various media.

Tim Tate and Laurel Lukaszweski share a laugh in Novie Trump’s studio

Says Susan of her initial visit to the studios:

“There is a gem tucked away in Mt. Rainier, MD, just a block away from Washington DC – a nondescript, unassuming building where art thrives, relationships flourish, learning is encouraged and life is enriched.
I was only with each of these artists a short time, but it was long enough to understand that they are cultivating an atmosphere of caring, support, friendship, community, humor and learning that helps them create magnificent art and shape extraordinary individuals. I can’t wait to be a part of it and share what I learn with you”


For the full blog posting – click HERE.

Allegra Marquart’s Narrative Glass

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Allegra Marquart
The Deer, Mouse, Crow & Turtle
kilncast and sand carved glass 18.5″ x18.5″

Since 1976 Allegra Marquart has been a professor at Maryland Institute College of Art teaching printmaking. Allegra’s imagery continues to gain in visual complexity. Her narrative glass panels started using fables that were familiar to those who know Aesop, La Fontaine and old English rhymes, but now her stories include ones written by Kipling, Edward Lear and ones handed down through generations of American Indians. If you ask Allegra what she does she might say that she makes people stand still, think and smile. Each of these stories are enhanced with a personal drawing style and processes Allegra loves for both making etchings on paper and in the fabrication of glass panels. Allegra’s work is full of invention, humor and pain.


Allegra Marquart
The Blue Jackal
kilncast and sand carved glass 18.5″ x18.5″


From Allegra’s artist statement:

“For the over a decade my etchings have grown from my observations of city life, human foibles and old fables. About 6 years ago I experienced a kind of epiphany. My images needed to be made of glass! The glass would act as a metaphor for the transparency, fragility, strength, permanence and reflective power in all the moments I was describing. I imagined these pictures in low relief made of glass that would refer to stone carvings on columns and friezes that people in ancient times used to describe their daily life.

Allegra Marquart
The Elephant’s Trunk
kilncast and sand carved glass 18.5″ x18.5″


So sure was I of this revelation that I went to work immediately. I began with sand blasting deeply into the glass to create my first body of work in this medium that was so new to me. A class at Pilchuck with Paul Marioni taught me how sand casting could give my images even greater physicality and drama. Work at The Corning Studio and The Washington Glass School (in DC) expanded my casting experience.

Allegra is part of the faculty at the Washington Glass School, and she creates the multi-colored glass panels in the studio’s large kilns. Firing color atop color, Allegra creates a basis on which to deep sand carve her visual narratives.

Below is a glimpse into the steps she uses in the creation of the fantastic panels:

Allegra spreads out crushed colored glass (coarse frit) on top of a glass panel that has already been fired with a different color.

Prepping the kiln for another long panel to be loaded for fusing.


After the panel is fired, annealed and cooled, Allegra covers the glass with a thick vinyl resist.

Allegra transfers and draws her imagery onto the resist, later cutting away the elements to be exposed to a deep sand blast session.


The panel is then carved with a force fed media (deep sand blasted) that cuts through the various color layers of glass.
Allegra will repeat the process on both the front and back of a panel, allowing the mix of light and color to work with her imagery.


The SOFA Chicago Art Expo will feature Allegra’s work at Maurine Littleton Gallery‘ space (#720).

Click HERE to jump to Allegra Marquart’s website.