Recycled Glass Art Workshop

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What We Leave Behind (detail) Erwin Timmers
cast recycled glass

Renowned Eco Artist Erwin Timmers will lead the recycled glass Going Green workshop this coming President’s Day Weekend.

Green up your life by doing something creative to help the environment!

This class is an exploration into using recycled glass to make sculptural pieces, architectural elements, and tableware. The class will delve into multiple techniques, including casting, fusing and slumping. Glass chemistry, coloration, and firing temperatures will be explained for each particular application. It is a fantastic way to learn aspects of any warm glass work while focusing on recycling!

Once you start down the path of recycled glass, you will see more and more opportunities for experimentation around you. No prior experience is necessary – you are encouraged to bring in materials you’d like to try…and you will leave with several very cool items!

Erwin Timmers

Going Green Class 1043
Dates Sat/Sun/Mon on Feb 19, 20 & 21
Time 10am – 4pm

Tuition $400

Erwin is one of the area’s leading “green artists”. Recycling, waste and how they relate to society are recurring themes in his work. Erwin’s main medium is one of the least recycled materials; float glass or window glass, and he has had to develop new techniques to exploit the properties of this material. His approach to art is multifaceted, incorporating metalwork, innovative lighting and glass design.

I &#9829 Valentines

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Tim Tate
Sacred Heart of Healing
blown glass 16 x 8 x 4 in. (40.6 x 20.3 x 10.2 cm) Permanent Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Sacred Heart of Healing was one of a series of nine hearts that Tim Tate created as a tribute to his late mother. Each of these hearts was inspired by an aspect of his mother’s personality. In this piece, the tiny drawings within the flame symbolize her love of natural healing. As a further tribute, Tate was persuaded by one of his students to have a tattoo of this piece inked on his arm.

For more information about this work visit the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Foundation Center for American Art .

Call 4 Artists!

>Spring is soon, and as we all know, in the spring, an artist’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of “Calls for Entries”.

Visual Overture Magazine, a quarterly publication that promotes emerging artists, has begun the entry process for its Summer 2011 Featured Emerging Artists competition. Seven artists (any medium) are selected (by artPark author Rob Jones) and featured in the magazine. Selected artists are presented on a two-page spread with images of their work, interview questions, artist statement, and contact details.

Entries are only $17 per artist – artists to submit digital files electronically. Complete the entry form and get three images to VO by April 18, 2011.

Also-
Torpedo Factory Art Center’s Annual Call

Deadline: February 28, 2011.

Open call for Washington, D.C. metro area artists for Torpedo Factory Art Center’s 2011 annual jury for artist members. Drop off date: February 28, 2011. The Torpedo Factory’s annual jury will be held February 28 – March 3, 2011.

The Torpedo Factory houses more than 165 artists in combination studio/gallery space. The application form and submission requirements are available on their website. Accepting submissions by emerging and established artists in all media. Direct inquiries to Michele Hoben at mphoben@aol.com.

Who are the jurors?
There are separate 3-person panels judging the 2-D work and the 3-D work. The jurors are highly qualified professional artists, curators, teachers, museum directors and the like, who are independent of the Torpedo Factory. Their decision is final. They will look for work that meets the highest standards of professionalism and promise.
NOTE: This jury process is NOT a critique. Artists will not receive a critique.

2D Jurors for 2011
Zoe Charlton
Vesela Sretenovic
Janos Enyedi

3D Jurors for 2011
Binnie Fry
Chris Shea
Novie Trump

Note to Artists: Get A Real Job!

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The Simple Dollar - a personal finance blog has an interesting article about artists and their financial prospects. Referencing a Francis Ford Coppola interview on the risks of making money from the arts, author Trent Hamm offers some insights on the hard facts of what an artist must be prepared to do to make a living from the arts and “follow their bliss” – what they don’t teach in art school.

Coppola’s point is that: the fun creative stuff that so many of us do really doesn’t earn us much money at all, at least not most of the time…

Don’t assume your talent or skill will be your money maker for a long, long time. Your talent or skill is going to be your side job – treat it like such. If you go to work, come home tired, and convince yourself to not do anything with it today, you’re never going to make it…

Live frugally… ’nuff said.

Make friends and connections – lots of them. Spend at least some of your time cultivating relationships with people who can help you with spreading what skills you have…

Improve your own social skills, especially in gently promoting yourself. If you’re introverted, this is key. The ability to communicate successfully with others, particularly when talking about yourself while not coming off as a braggart, is an ability that’s vital if you want to get others interested in your skill. So many artists I know claim to be introverts, and shy away from talking about their work. They really MUST overcome this and be able to easily speak (in positive terms) about their own work.

If you want riches, find another career path. Art is wonderful, but it doesn’t channel human effort in a way that generates wealth. A Generous inheritance from a wealthy family is one of the easiest and fastest ways to become rich, but cannot always be achieved.

The best thing you can do if you have talent and are passionate about that talent is to start packaging it up. Contrary to what often seems taught in art school – is not true that if you sell your art, you have “sold out”.

The message from the blog posting is “Do what you love, but have a back up plan that you can tolerate to support what you love.”

Click HERE to read the entire article.

Glass Fun Facts: Why Is Glass Transparent?

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UK Professor Phil Moriarty discusses what makes glass appear transparent in this video by the Sixty Symbols – a collection of videos about physics and astronomy presented by experts from The University of Nottingham.

A photon checks into a hotel. The bell hop asks him ” Can I help you with your luggage?” To which the photon replies, “I don’t have any. I’m traveling light.”

I still have no idea why glass is transparent, but his accent is so good that he doesn’t need to pronounce words right. I guess his explanation didn’t have enough energy and passed right true me. He must assume I know something about being excited.

Previous Glass Fun Facts postings:

Glass Fun Facts: Gaffer/Composer

More Glass Fun Facts: Bullseye Glass

Float Glass Fun Facts

Glass Fun Facts – Shattered Glass Predicts Weather

Historical Glass Fun Facts – How the Invention of Pyrex and The Studio Glass Movement are Connected.

Hot Stuff – "Lost Foam Process" at DC Glass Works

>Robert Kincheloe was at the DC Glass Works aluminum pour last night – working on a series of sculpture pieces. Watch as the molten aluminum is poured into the steel containers containing sand and the original stryofoam forms that are sacrificed as the hot aluminum replaces the original.


click on image to jump to video

Kirk Waldroff – Untold Fables

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Kirk Waldroff
Theodulus and the Egret, Part 2
| 2011

left: glass, oak, and LED lighting | 30″ x 23″ x 5.5″
right: hand-colored woodcut on Rives BFK | 10″ x 18″

Printmaker and glass artist Kirk Waldroff has a solo exhibition at Glenview Mansion in Rockville, Maryland (opening reception on February 6th, 1:30pm to 3:30pm).
Kirk is exhibiting new work including prints, print based glass sculptures, paintings, and even a queen-size bed.

Untold Fables
New Prints, Print-based Sculpture, and Paintings

February 6 – March 2, 2011

Opening Reception: Sunday, February 6, 1:30pm – 3:30pm
Glenview Mansion Art Gallery
Glenview Mansion at Rockville Civic Center Park

603 Edmonston Drive
Rockville, Maryland 20851

Kirk Waldroff has a degree in illustration from the University of Delaware. Kirk’s work has been shown at many area galleries, and was featured in the international exhibition “Glass 3”. Kirk is currently assisting with classes at the Washington Glass School, while developing techniques that combine printmaking and sculptural glass.